Warnings help amid Indonesia tsunami scare: Monitoring systems put in place after the 2004 Asian tsunami appeared to work well after an 8.7-magnitude earthquake struck roughly the same area.
Photo: People look at walls damaged by a strong earthquake at a prison in Aceh province in Indonesia on Wednesday. Credit: Kyodo News / Associated Press

Warnings help amid Indonesia tsunami scare: Monitoring systems put in place after the 2004 Asian tsunami appeared to work well after an 8.7-magnitude earthquake struck roughly the same area.

Photo: People look at walls damaged by a strong earthquake at a prison in Aceh province in Indonesia on Wednesday. Credit: Kyodo News / Associated Press

How collective memory saved lives during Japan’s tsunamis: When the tsunami struck Miyatojima island, a story passed down through generations meant residents knew what to do and kept many safe.

A millennium ago, the residents of Murohama, knowing they were going to be inundated, had sought safety on the village’s closest hill. But they had entered into a deadly trap. A second wave, which had reached the interior of the island through an inlet, was speeding over the rice paddies from the opposite direction. The waves collided at the hill and killed those who had taken refuge there. To signify their grief and to advise future generations, the survivors erected a shrine.
… Some 50 generations later, on March 11, 2011, the Murohama tsunami warning tower — which was supposed to sound an alarm — was silent, toppled by the temblor. Still, without the benefit of an official warning system supported by modern science, the locals relied on the lesson that had been transmitted generation to generation for 1,000 years. “We all know the story about the two tsunami waves that collided at the shrine,” I was told.

Wow.
Photo: Evacuees from Futaba, a town near the tsunami-crippled Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear plant, arrive to an evacuation shelter near Tokyo. Credit: Eugene Hoshiko / Associated Press

How collective memory saved lives during Japan’s tsunamis: When the tsunami struck Miyatojima island, a story passed down through generations meant residents knew what to do and kept many safe.

A millennium ago, the residents of Murohama, knowing they were going to be inundated, had sought safety on the village’s closest hill. But they had entered into a deadly trap. A second wave, which had reached the interior of the island through an inlet, was speeding over the rice paddies from the opposite direction. The waves collided at the hill and killed those who had taken refuge there. To signify their grief and to advise future generations, the survivors erected a shrine.

… Some 50 generations later, on March 11, 2011, the Murohama tsunami warning tower — which was supposed to sound an alarm — was silent, toppled by the temblor. Still, without the benefit of an official warning system supported by modern science, the locals relied on the lesson that had been transmitted generation to generation for 1,000 years. “We all know the story about the two tsunami waves that collided at the shrine,” I was told.

Wow.

Photo: Evacuees from Futaba, a town near the tsunami-crippled Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear plant, arrive to an evacuation shelter near Tokyo. Credit: Eugene Hoshiko / Associated Press

March 11 will mark the first anniversary of the massive tsunami that pummeled Japan, claiming more than 20,000 lives. The Times’ photo desk has made an amazing gallery of interactive before-and-after sliders.

Photos credit: AFP/Getty Images

Scientists are working to create an underground image of the San Andreas Fault, one of the most seismically active and geologically complex regions of the country, in the hopes of changing the way we think about the eventual Big One.
Photo: Geologists Coyn Criley and Joe Svitek tread lightly towards the edge of a blast hole they detonated minutes before. Credit: Don Bartletti / Los Angeles Times

Scientists are working to create an underground image of the San Andreas Fault, one of the most seismically active and geologically complex regions of the country, in the hopes of changing the way we think about the eventual Big One.

Photo: Geologists Coyn Criley and Joe Svitek tread lightly towards the edge of a blast hole they detonated minutes before. Credit: Don Bartletti / Los Angeles Times

Taylor Anderson, right, with one of her students in Ishinomaki, Japan, where she taught English. She is the first American found dead after the Japan earthquake.
Credit: Anderson Family / Associated Press / July 17, 2010

Taylor Anderson, right, with one of her students in Ishinomaki, Japan, where she taught English. She is the first American found dead after the Japan earthquake.

Credit: Anderson Family / Associated Press / July 17, 2010

Without Internet or Electricity, Newspapers Become a Lifeline

With computers, cell phones and printing presses knocked out, a newspaper in Ishinomaki, Japan, wrote the news by hand

A series of satellite images of Japan, using a slider to view cities before and after catastrophic damage from the 9.0 earthquake and subsequent tsunami.

A series of satellite images of Japan, using a slider to view cities before and after catastrophic damage from the 9.0 earthquake and subsequent tsunami.

Japan has been rocked by hundreds of aftershocks since a massive magnitude 9.0 earthquake struck on March 11 at 2:46 p.m. Japan local time.
This map shows all aftershocks above magnitude 5.0, and you can also see a series of “smaller” quakes — the first was a 7.2 — starting several days earlier.

Japan has been rocked by hundreds of aftershocks since a massive magnitude 9.0 earthquake struck on March 11 at 2:46 p.m. Japan local time.

This map shows all aftershocks above magnitude 5.0, and you can also see a series of “smaller” quakes — the first was a 7.2 — starting several days earlier.

reblogged via newsweek:

Front pages from Japan’s leading newspapers

reblogged via newsweek:

Front pages from Japan’s leading newspapers

test reblogged from newsweek

Japan nuclear plant rocked by another explosion

A buildup of hydrogen gas causes another explosion, destroying the outer shell of a reactor at the quake-damaged Fukushima No. 1 plant. The blast comes after the pumping of seawater stalled, exposing the fuel rods to air and increasing the risk of radiation being released. Death toll continues to rise as 2,000 bodies are found in a single province.

Latest photos from Japan
Latest news:  Threat of meltdown rising in Japan 'Heartbroken' Obama renews U.S. offer to help Grim recovery effort along coast Volcano in southern Japan erupts
International rescue teams pour inOfficial deaths: 1,886  Official missing: 2,369  Unofficial counts: 2,000 bodies found, 10,000 estimated deaths, in Miyagi  Households without water: 1.4 million  Households without power: 1.9 million
Japan’s economy stumbling in wake of disaster Nikkei stock average: -6.2%  Topix index: -7.5%
Tokyo forgoes its trademark blaze of neon Devastation has little effect on culture’s impeccable manners Japan’s crisis may have already derailed ‘nuclear renaissance’ Health officials face a crisis of trauma injuries and waterborne diseaseJapanese American groups in L.A. use Web to respond to quake
Photo: Because roads are cut off or buried, evacuees are traveling by foot. These people walk on a railway track of Japan Railway’s Ofunato Line. Credit: Associated Press

Latest photos from Japan

Latest news:
Threat of meltdown rising in Japan
'Heartbroken' Obama renews U.S. offer to help
Grim recovery effort along coast
Volcano in southern Japan erupts

International rescue teams pour in
Official deaths: 1,886
Official missing: 2,369
Unofficial counts: 2,000 bodies found, 10,000 estimated deaths, in Miyagi
Households without water: 1.4 million
Households without power: 1.9 million

Japan’s economy stumbling in wake of disaster
Nikkei stock average: -6.2%
Topix index: -7.5%

Tokyo forgoes its trademark blaze of neon
Devastation has little effect on culture’s impeccable manners
Japan’s crisis may have already derailed ‘nuclear renaissance’
Health officials face a crisis of trauma injuries and waterborne disease
Japanese American groups in L.A. use Web to respond to quake

Photo: Because roads are cut off or buried, evacuees are traveling by foot. These people walk on a railway track of Japan Railway’s Ofunato Line. Credit: Associated Press

From our archives

A 3900-word piece from March 14, 1993:

In hopes of becoming energy independent, Japan has set a goal of constructing 40 new reactors during the next 20 years, more than doubling its capacity to use nuclear power to generate electricity. That would push Japan past France and the former Soviet Union to make it second only to the United States in nuclear-power generation.

But the battle speaks to more than nuclear power. The way the Japanese government, in concert with industry, has used money, jobs and propaganda to overcome opposition and turn Shimokita peninsula into a key element of its nuclear strategy is a telling example of how a country’s leadership can push through policies it has determined to be in the nation’s best interests, even if those policies are unpopular.

reblogged via soupsoup:
aljazeera:

Officials are checking residents of the area around the Fukushima nuclear power plant for signs of radiation poisoning.

reblogged via soupsoup:

aljazeera:

Officials are checking residents of the area around the Fukushima nuclear power plant for signs of radiation poisoning.

test reblogged from soupsoup