An exhibition on display at the SFO Museum transports you back to the days when airline travel was fun. Above you can see some of the amenities offered to passengers in the 40s, 50s, 60s and 70s. The “R.O.N.” you see on the toiletry bag isn’t someone’s name – it stands for “Remain Over Night,” which meant grooming kits back then and is the name of the current exhibition.

Photos courtesy of the SFO Museum.

Can Route 66 remain a tourist draw? The operator of the Wigwam Motel in San Bernardino is working to keep its culture alive.

Photos: Mark Boster / Los Angeles Times

The underwater photography of Chris Burkard

Central California-based photographer Burkard recently sat down with Framework for a Q&A on his kinetic work, his favorite locations and some insider knowledge about the difficulties of taking photos under water.

Check out the full interview, and take a deep dive into his work right here.

Photos: Chris Burkard

nevver:

Still falls the rain

Appropriate, given the weather craziness out East, with impacts stretching all the way out to LAX travelers.

test reblogged from nevver

socaleveryday:

The 110 into downtown LA.

Sometimes the traffic can look nice! As long as you’re not in it, of course.

socaleveryday:

The 110 into downtown LA.

Sometimes the traffic can look nice! As long as you’re not in it, of course.

test reblogged from socaleveryday

Documenting Brazil’s vitality

Our own photography whiz Michael Robinson Chavez is currently on a month-long assignment in Brazil, and what better way to keep the world updated on his travels than Instagram?


You can follow Chavez on his Instagram account, or keep tabs on our own site, if you’re not so Instagram-inclined.

Climbing Mount Fuji

Long admired for its beauty, and well-traveled by those looking for a gorgeous view or a climbing challenge, Mount Fuji faces a new challenge: Being named a world heritage site.

Climbing Mount Fuji, Japan’s most iconic landmark, is a group activity: Seldom is it climbed in solitude. The recent recognition of the 12,388-foot peak as a UNESCO World Heritage Site has many here worried that it will draw still more people, adding to the wear and tear on the environment from the more than 300,000 who already climb the mountain each year.

Read more over at Framework

Photos: David Guttenfelder / Associated Press

The best of our reader’s summer vacations

We asked, and you answered: Our yearly look at the best photography from your summer breaks has resulted in a crazy amount of stunning shots (and plenty of vacation envy). The photos above are just a tiny sample of the favorites picked out from the submissions

So see some more of the editor’s picks here, or, you can check out thumbnails of the more than 1,500 submissions here.

Photos: Ken Lee, Joselle Celine Gilvezan, Deanna Bowers, Lyndon W. Wong, Lynn Novatt, Michelle Nolan, Riley Hayes

Scenes from before the civil war in Syria

The unrest in Syria that swiftly turned into an escalating civil war began in 2011, and with no end in sight, the pre-war country fades further and further into the distance. Now, with the possibility of U.S. military intervention, depending on congressional action and President Obama, take a look at what life was once like in the war-torn country.

Photos: Louai Beshara, Anwar Amro / AFP/Getty Images, Bassem Tellawi, Hussein Malla / Associated Press, Ghaith Abdul-Ahad / Getty Images

photojojo:

A simple yet epic portrait by Andrew Kodama! Andrew is a Northern California based photographer who documents his travels and adventures in his wonderful photostream. 
Featuring: Epic Travel Photography by the Talented Andrew Kodama
via DigitalFaun

photojojo:

A simple yet epic portrait by Andrew Kodama! Andrew is a Northern California based photographer who documents his travels and adventures in his wonderful photostream. 

Featuring: Epic Travel Photography by the Talented Andrew Kodama

via DigitalFaun

test reblogged from photojojo

buzzfeed:

Everything about California is beautiful (especially In N Out burgers).

We endorse this message.

test reblogged from buzzfeed

"The cable car is dead. Long live the cable car."

So says reporter Christopher Reynolds, who along with photographer Mark Boster composed an endearing love letter to San Francisco that begins with the cable cars, warts and all:

The oohing and ahhing over the world’s only remaining manually operated big-city cable car system will begin shortly. But first, let’s admit a few things:

That rats congregate near the cable car turntable by Ghirardelli Square. That panhandlers still plague the gritty turntable at Powell and Market streets. That $6 a ride would be one of the worst public transit bargains in the West, if these cars were really about public transit. That some conductors and gripmen are as rude as the hills are steep. That for prompt cross-town travel in daylight hours, the Powell Street lines are about as practical as a Ferris wheel. 

Yet as many a San Franciscan can tell you, the heart wants what the heart wants.

Read Reynolds’ full report in our latest Column One feature here, or take a look at Boster’s photos over at Framework.

Photos: Mark Boster / Los Angeles Times

World War II, chemical weapons and…bunny rabbits?

The pretty little island of Okunoshima is known for two things: It was there that the Japanese military once cooked up chemical weapons, a mission so guarded that the spot did not exist on official World War II-era maps. And it is totally overrun by fluffy bunny rabbits.

Read more on the dual identity of Okunoshima, which during WWII hosted extensive Japanese chemical weapons projects, and is now also known by tourists for its extensive rabbit population.
Photo: Emily Alpert / Los Angeles Times

World War II, chemical weapons and…bunny rabbits?

The pretty little island of Okunoshima is known for two things: It was there that the Japanese military once cooked up chemical weapons, a mission so guarded that the spot did not exist on official World War II-era maps. And it is totally overrun by fluffy bunny rabbits.

Read more on the dual identity of Okunoshima, which during WWII hosted extensive Japanese chemical weapons projects, and is now also known by tourists for its extensive rabbit population.

Photo: Emily Alpert / Los Angeles Times

wnyc:

architizer:

Astounding Tilt-Shift Perspectives of World Monuments!

Anyone who’s traveled to popular touristic sites knows the feeling of being caught in the crossfire of countless camera lenses—the annoyed (and annoying) jockeying to capture the perfect shot…which in most cases looks exactly like everyone else’s. When we stumbled across Richard Silver’s photographs of iconic monuments, we were shocked—caught in the same tourist hustle, Silver manages to give us a new perspective on famous landmarks we didn’t think possible. Read more!

How to take the “monumental” out of the worlds monuments. Super cool.

-Jody, BL Show-

Whoa!

test reblogged from wnyc

A captivating journey to the Philippines

Los Angeles Times photographer Luis Sinco, along with friends Hersley Ven Casero and Eli Reed, took a trip to his hometown in the Philippines, and as is their nature as photographers, they documented the trip. The photos above are just a sampling of the work the trio produced while overseas.

Check out all of the stunning travel photos over at Framework.

Photos: Eli Reed, Hersley Ven Casero, Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times