Black hole spun: It’s been far too long since we shared some awesome space news. See that artist’s rendition above? That’s a black hole spinning near the speed of light. Even if it’s an interpretation, it’s still pretty darn incredible.
The image was sparked by the joint efforts of NASA’s X-ray telescope NuSTAR and the European Space Agency’s XMM-Newton space telescope, which examined the black hole anchoring NGC 1365 to determine how quickly it was spinning.
Just how does that work?

To solve the mystery, the XMM-Newton telescope — which studies low-energy X-rays, up to about 10 kiloelectron volts — teamed up with NuSTAR — which looks at very high-energy X-rays. NuSTAR, with a range from 3 to 79 kiloelectron volts, would fill in the rough sketch scientists had of this black hole.

Read more via Science Now.
Photo: NASA/JPL-Caltech

Black hole spun: It’s been far too long since we shared some awesome space news. See that artist’s rendition above? That’s a black hole spinning near the speed of light. Even if it’s an interpretation, it’s still pretty darn incredible.

The image was sparked by the joint efforts of NASA’s X-ray telescope NuSTAR and the European Space Agency’s XMM-Newton space telescope, which examined the black hole anchoring NGC 1365 to determine how quickly it was spinning.

Just how does that work?

To solve the mystery, the XMM-Newton telescope — which studies low-energy X-rays, up to about 10 kiloelectron volts — teamed up with NuSTAR — which looks at very high-energy X-rays. NuSTAR, with a range from 3 to 79 kiloelectron volts, would fill in the rough sketch scientists had of this black hole.

Read more via Science Now.

Photo: NASA/JPL-Caltech