Seattle’s socialist, Occupy-approved city council member

Seattle has long been a bastion for liberal politics, but newly-elected City Councilwoman Kshama Sawant pushes the city’s political envelope with her avowed ties to socialism and the Occupy movement. The city’s more conservative political figures are skeptical of Sawant, but her supporters have successfully rallied around her, and her central call for a $15 minimum wage.

Says Sawant of her position outside of the typical political structure:

"It is time, high time, that we workers opt for a mass political alternative to the two big-business parties!"

Read through reporter Maria L. La Ganga’s profile of Sawant in its entirety here.

Photos: Alan Berner / Seattle Times, Ted S. Warren / Associated Press

Here are some more photos from Seattle. Check out scenes from around the nation in our May Day gallery on Framework.

Photos credit: Stuart Isset / Bloomberg

The photos coming out of Seattle’s May Day rallies are pretty unreal.
Photo: Protesters smash shop windows during May Day protests in Seattle. Credit: Joshua Trujillo / Seattlepi.com

The photos coming out of Seattle’s May Day rallies are pretty unreal.

Photo: Protesters smash shop windows during May Day protests in Seattle. Credit: Joshua Trujillo / Seattlepi.com

Seattle’s underground history of bad plumbing and prostitutes: Going to Seattle? A predisposition for flooding prompted city officials and engineers to raise the street level in the 1890s. The  work left behind subterranean passages that once were main roadways and first-floor storefronts of old downtown.
Photo:   Bill Speidel’s Underground Tour is a leisurely, guided walking tour beneath Seattle’s sidewalks and streets. Credit: Rajaram Sethursman

Seattle’s underground history of bad plumbing and prostitutes: Going to Seattle? A predisposition for flooding prompted city officials and engineers to raise the street level in the 1890s. The work left behind subterranean passages that once were main roadways and first-floor storefronts of old downtown.

Photo: Bill Speidel’s Underground Tour is a leisurely, guided walking tour beneath Seattle’s sidewalks and streets. Credit: Rajaram Sethursman

In Seattle, work starts on “greenest” office building: It’ll be six stories, but expectations are sky-high.

The Bullitt Center — which eventually will use only its own rainwater, generate its own power and compost its own sewage — is the first big office building designed to carry its own environmental weight.

Photo:   Seattle has 12 “living buildings” in the works, places designed to generate as much power as they consume and process their own wastewater. Credit: Lawrence K. Ho / Los Angeles Times

In Seattle, work starts on “greenest” office building: It’ll be six stories, but expectations are sky-high.

The Bullitt Center — which eventually will use only its own rainwater, generate its own power and compost its own sewage — is the first big office building designed to carry its own environmental weight.

Photo: Seattle has 12 “living buildings” in the works, places designed to generate as much power as they consume and process their own wastewater. Credit: Lawrence K. Ho / Los Angeles Times

The tradition of adding to the Market Theater Gum Wall in Seattle began in the mid-1990s, when theatergoers waiting for shows began sticking coins to the wall using their chewed-up gum. And, yet — according to Trip Advisor, it’s only the second germiest attraction in the world.

The tradition of adding to the Market Theater Gum Wall in Seattle began in the mid-1990s, when theatergoers waiting for shows began sticking coins to the wall using their chewed-up gum. And, yet — according to Trip Advisor, it’s only the second germiest attraction in the world.