Using light, scientists make bad memories good in mice
"In a place where rainfall averages two inches a year, rocks are being shoved around by mechanisms typically seen in arctic climes."
Two cousins’ stroke of luck has provided the final evidence in solving a mystery of the Racetrack Playa that has long puzzled visitors and scientists: What mechanism moves rocks across flat dirt in the heart of the hottest, driest place on earth?

"In a place where rainfall averages two inches a year, rocks are being shoved around by mechanisms typically seen in arctic climes."

Two cousins’ stroke of luck has provided the final evidence in solving a mystery of the Racetrack Playa that has long puzzled visitors and scientists: What mechanism moves rocks across flat dirt in the heart of the hottest, driest place on earth?

Toothless flying “dragons” ruled Earth’s skies for tens of millions of years, a new study says.
Image: Artist’s rendition from a study in PLOS One in 2008 shows a group of giant azhdarchids, Quetzalcoatlus northropi, foraging on a Cretaceous fern prairie. (Courtesy of Mark P. Witton and Darren Naish)

Toothless flying “dragons” ruled Earth’s skies for tens of millions of years, a new study says.

Image: Artist’s rendition from a study in PLOS One in 2008 shows a group of giant azhdarchids, Quetzalcoatlus northropi, foraging on a Cretaceous fern prairie. (Courtesy of Mark P. Witton and Darren Naish)

Scientists have uncovered a previously unknown pterosaur with an enormous sail-shaped crest on its head. Beyond Caiuajara dobruskii's unusual looks, the discovery is also notable because bones from at least 47 of the creatures were found in a small area. “It's kind of like they stumbled on a hidden Caiuajara city,” reporter Deborah Netburn writes.
Image: An artist’s reconstruction depicting three stages of crest development in the newly discovered pterosaur. Credit: Maurilio Oliveira / National Museum of Brazil

Scientists have uncovered a previously unknown pterosaur with an enormous sail-shaped crest on its head. Beyond Caiuajara dobruskii's unusual looks, the discovery is also notable because bones from at least 47 of the creatures were found in a small area. “It's kind of like they stumbled on a hidden Caiuajara city,” reporter Deborah Netburn writes.

Image: An artist’s reconstruction depicting three stages of crest development in the newly discovered pterosaur. Credit: Maurilio Oliveira / National Museum of Brazil

The experimental serum given to the Christian aid workers who are infected with Ebola was manufactured using plants.

The drug is a cocktail of three “humanized” monoclonal antibodies that are manufactured in a group of fragrant plants or bushes known by the genus name Nicotiana. Read more about how the drug works.

We lose two hours of life for every hour sitting, one scientist says.

His name is Dr. James Levine, and he’s written a book about how he came to the scientific conclusion that our chairs are killing us and what can be done to stop the threat.

Satellites about the size of a loaf of bread may one day explore space.

Unlike most spacecraft, which are powered by rocket engines and cost hundreds of millions of dollars, these tiny satellites are expected to cost a few million dollars each and use the sun’s energy to push them across a windless space.

It all underlines that solar physicists really don’t know what the heck is happening on the sun.
A newly discovered fossil from Changyuraptor yangi, a species of “four-winged” flying dinosaur, reveals a design more like a plane than a bird, according to a team of scientists. Science reporter Amina Khan explains how its extra-long tail feathers could have helped it to get around despite its comparatively large size.
Image: Stephanie Abramowicz / Dinosaur Institute, Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County

A newly discovered fossil from Changyuraptor yangi, a species of “four-winged” flying dinosaur, reveals a design more like a plane than a bird, according to a team of scientists. Science reporter Amina Khan explains how its extra-long tail feathers could have helped it to get around despite its comparatively large size.

Image: Stephanie Abramowicz / Dinosaur Institute, Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County

Scientists have discovered the fossilized remains of a 2-inch-long hedgehog that lived 52 million years ago. They named it Silvacola acares, which means “tiny forest dweller.” The team also found fossils from a tapir-like animal at the same site.
Image: An artist’s rendering of the tapir-like mammal, left, and the tiny hedgehog. Credit: Julius Csotonyi

Scientists have discovered the fossilized remains of a 2-inch-long hedgehog that lived 52 million years ago. They named it Silvacola acares, which means “tiny forest dweller.” The team also found fossils from a tapir-like animal at the same site.

Image: An artist’s rendering of the tapir-like mammal, left, and the tiny hedgehog. Credit: Julius Csotonyi

All that work that chefs do to make your food look pretty? It’s not just for aesthetics – pretty food tastes better, a new study says.
Photo: Jay L. Clendenin / Los Angeles Times

All that work that chefs do to make your food look pretty? It’s not just for aesthetics – pretty food tastes better, a new study says.

Photo: Jay L. Clendenin / Los Angeles Times