San Francisco Batkid is the best thing to happen this weekAnd maybe even the best thing ever. Who could say no to a young boy who’s celebrating beating his cancer into remission?
Downtown San Francisco, thanks to the Make-a-Wish Greater Bay Area Foundation, city officials and the work of thousands of volunteers, turned into a Gotham City today, complete with villains like the Riddler and Penguin, just waiting for a tiny caped crusader to swoop in.
The San Francisco Chronicle even published a limited-edition “Batkid Saves City” issue.
Read more on young Miles’ struggle, and his eventual superheroics, over at L.A. Now and Share It Now. And if you’re so inspired, head over to the Make-A-Wish Foundation’s site and perhaps help make more dreams come true (once their site is done being swamped by bat-traffic).

Photo: Jeff Chiu / Associated Press, San Francisco Chronicle

San Francisco Batkid is the best thing to happen this week

And maybe even the best thing ever. Who could say no to a young boy who’s celebrating beating his cancer into remission?

Downtown San Francisco, thanks to the Make-a-Wish Greater Bay Area Foundation, city officials and the work of thousands of volunteers, turned into a Gotham City today, complete with villains like the Riddler and Penguin, just waiting for a tiny caped crusader to swoop in.



The San Francisco Chronicle even published a limited-edition “Batkid Saves City” issue.

Read more on young Miles’ struggle, and his eventual superheroics, over at L.A. Now and Share It Now. And if you’re so inspired, head over to the Make-A-Wish Foundation’s site and perhaps help make more dreams come true (once their site is done being swamped by bat-traffic).

Photo: Jeff Chiu / Associated Press, San Francisco Chronicle

"The cable car is dead. Long live the cable car."

So says reporter Christopher Reynolds, who along with photographer Mark Boster composed an endearing love letter to San Francisco that begins with the cable cars, warts and all:

The oohing and ahhing over the world’s only remaining manually operated big-city cable car system will begin shortly. But first, let’s admit a few things:

That rats congregate near the cable car turntable by Ghirardelli Square. That panhandlers still plague the gritty turntable at Powell and Market streets. That $6 a ride would be one of the worst public transit bargains in the West, if these cars were really about public transit. That some conductors and gripmen are as rude as the hills are steep. That for prompt cross-town travel in daylight hours, the Powell Street lines are about as practical as a Ferris wheel. 

Yet as many a San Franciscan can tell you, the heart wants what the heart wants.

Read Reynolds’ full report in our latest Column One feature here, or take a look at Boster’s photos over at Framework.

Photos: Mark Boster / Los Angeles Times

kqedscience:

How The West Coast Will Look Under 25 Feet Of Water
“Back in April, artist Nickolay Lamm put together a collection of illustrations of what some of the East Coast’s popular tourist destinations would look like under 25 feet of water, the potential sea level rise expected in the next few centuries. Since then, he’s added a few new destinations along the West Coast in California.”

Yikes - Venice Beach turns into Venice Bay.

kqedscience:

How The West Coast Will Look Under 25 Feet Of Water

Back in April, artist Nickolay Lamm put together a collection of illustrations of what some of the East Coast’s popular tourist destinations would look like under 25 feet of water, the potential sea level rise expected in the next few centuries. Since then, he’s added a few new destinations along the West Coast in California.”

Yikes - Venice Beach turns into Venice Bay.

test reblogged from kqedscience

Ninety-four and still writing: Think you’ll still be working at your job by the time you’re approaching retirement age? How about by the time you’re 94? For one journalist, age is just a number - nothing gets between him and his beat.

The San Francisco Chronicle’s David Perlman churned out 111 stories last year and is still going strong. Not bad for someone born before the discovery of penicillin and Pluto.

Read more about Perlman’s inspiring story here, from Times writer Maria L. La Ganga.

Ninety-four and still writing: Think you’ll still be working at your job by the time you’re approaching retirement age? How about by the time you’re 94? For one journalist, age is just a number - nothing gets between him and his beat.

The San Francisco Chronicle’s David Perlman churned out 111 stories last year and is still going strong. Not bad for someone born before the discovery of penicillin and Pluto.

Read more about Perlman’s inspiring story here, from Times writer

Operation Midnight Climax (SF Weekly)

longformorg:

How the CIA, under a program called MK-ULTRA, used a San Francisco apartment to dose johns with LSD.

| |

Not related to “Threat Level Midnight"… as far we know.

test reblogged from theatlantic

 Drug users’ union in San Francisco part of growing movement: Some members are clean, but most are not. They have joined together to work for decriminalization and battle disease, injury and death among users.
Photo: Lydia Blumberg said she felt a weight lift the minute she walked into her first union meeting of the San Francisco Drug Users Union. Credit: David Elliott Lewis

Drug users’ union in San Francisco part of growing movement: Some members are clean, but most are not. They have joined together to work for decriminalization and battle disease, injury and death among users.

Photo: Lydia Blumberg said she felt a weight lift the minute she walked into her first union meeting of the San Francisco Drug Users Union. Credit: David Elliott Lewis

Standing by the wooden ladder: San Francisco is the only fire department in the country to still make all of its own ladders. A look at the singular woodshop in this famously fire-phobic city.

"A wood ladder," Braun said, "does not conduct electricity. In case you have a ladder up and you were to strike a live wire, you won’t get electrocuted."
It’s a danger that retired Battalion Chief William C. Peters of the Jersey City (N.J.) Fire Department understands all too well.
In the 1990s, Jersey City firefighters were called to a blazing tenement. People were trapped on the third floor, screaming for help. As two rescuers struggled to hoist an aluminum ladder in the snow, a third firefighter jumped in to help. When they swung the apparatus toward the building, it struck a 4,800-volt primary power line.
All three firefighters were hit with a jolt of electricity, Peters recalled. One of the men died. Another lost toes and a finger. The third was blown clear. “His heart rhythm was screwed up for a while,” Peters said.

Photo: Craftsman Jerry Lee is shown in the city’s public works building, where the city Fire Department continues to make and repair its own wood fire ladders.    Credit: Mark Boster / Los Angeles Times

Standing by the wooden ladder: San Francisco is the only fire department in the country to still make all of its own ladders. A look at the singular woodshop in this famously fire-phobic city.

"A wood ladder," Braun said, "does not conduct electricity. In case you have a ladder up and you were to strike a live wire, you won’t get electrocuted."

It’s a danger that retired Battalion Chief William C. Peters of the Jersey City (N.J.) Fire Department understands all too well.

In the 1990s, Jersey City firefighters were called to a blazing tenement. People were trapped on the third floor, screaming for help. As two rescuers struggled to hoist an aluminum ladder in the snow, a third firefighter jumped in to help. When they swung the apparatus toward the building, it struck a 4,800-volt primary power line.

All three firefighters were hit with a jolt of electricity, Peters recalled. One of the men died. Another lost toes and a finger. The third was blown clear. “His heart rhythm was screwed up for a while,” Peters said.

Photo: Craftsman Jerry Lee is shown in the city’s public works building, where the city Fire Department continues to make and repair its own wood fire ladders. Credit: Mark Boster / Los Angeles Times

In a San Francisco neighborhood, another way to pay: Insular Bernal Heights — “this weird little borderline utopia,” as one resident calls it — has updated “complementary currency” in the form of a debit card.
This sounds like a fascinating experiment!

Designed by two neighborhood loyalists versed in technology and banking, the Bernal Bucks card allows residents to pay for their purchases while earning credits every time they swipe it at any of the two dozen area businesses that have signed on since June.
Accrued as frequent-flier miles are, the bucks can be printed as coupons and used toward future purchases. Cardholders also can donate their accrued “wealth” to neighborhood nonprofits.
… Branded with a cheerful image of Bernal’s iconic hill, their Visa debit card is issued by the local Community Trust Credit Union and aims to make patronizing neighborhood stores simpler: Residents can earn rewards or make charitable donations without having to keep track of stickers on their bills or carry a passel of buy-nine-and-get-the-10th-free punch cards.

Photo: The Bernal Bucks card allows residents to pay for their purchases while earning credits every time they swipe it at any of the two dozen area businesses that have signed on since June. Credit: Mark Boster / Los Angeles Times

In a San Francisco neighborhood, another way to pay: Insular Bernal Heights — “this weird little borderline utopia,” as one resident calls it — has updated “complementary currency” in the form of a debit card.

This sounds like a fascinating experiment!

Designed by two neighborhood loyalists versed in technology and banking, the Bernal Bucks card allows residents to pay for their purchases while earning credits every time they swipe it at any of the two dozen area businesses that have signed on since June.

Accrued as frequent-flier miles are, the bucks can be printed as coupons and used toward future purchases. Cardholders also can donate their accrued “wealth” to neighborhood nonprofits.

… Branded with a cheerful image of Bernal’s iconic hill, their Visa debit card is issued by the local Community Trust Credit Union and aims to make patronizing neighborhood stores simpler: Residents can earn rewards or make charitable donations without having to keep track of stickers on their bills or carry a passel of buy-nine-and-get-the-10th-free punch cards.

Photo: The Bernal Bucks card allows residents to pay for their purchases while earning credits every time they swipe it at any of the two dozen area businesses that have signed on since June. Credit: Mark Boster / Los Angeles Times

Hard times for a tower and its murals: Faced with complaints from neighborhood groups, docents and even one of the artists’ descendants, San Francisco has stepped up efforts to restore the landmark Coit Tower and its historical Depression-era frescoes.
Photo:  USC professor Kevin Starr and UC San Diego professor Bram Dijkstra view the mural “Department Store” at Coit Tower in San Francisco. Credit: Dave Getzschman / For The Times

Hard times for a tower and its murals: Faced with complaints from neighborhood groups, docents and even one of the artists’ descendants, San Francisco has stepped up efforts to restore the landmark Coit Tower and its historical Depression-era frescoes.

Photo: USC professor Kevin Starr and UC San Diego professor Bram Dijkstra view the mural “Department Store” at Coit Tower in San Francisco. Credit: Dave Getzschman / For The Times

Upscale culture and gang violence share a small space: In San Francisco’s Mission District, gang violence is layered atop the flourishing restaurant and club scene that has grown up in recent years.
Photo:  Recent shootings are reminders that half of the one-square-mile Mission District in San Francisco is gang territory. Credit: Robert Galbraith / Reuters

Upscale culture and gang violence share a small space: In San Francisco’s Mission District, gang violence is layered atop the flourishing restaurant and club scene that has grown up in recent years.

Photo: Recent shootings are reminders that half of the one-square-mile Mission District in San Francisco is gang territory. Credit: Robert Galbraith / Reuters

SFMOMA is our pick for Tumblr Tuesday. Who are you recommending today?

SFMOMA is our pick for Tumblr Tuesday. Who are you recommending today?

San Francisco literary festival Litquake just keeps growing: Now in its 12th year, Litquake spans nine days and features 848 authors.
Photo:  A crowd gathers in a Mission District laundry mat for Loads of Prose, a Lit Crawl event. Credit: Shelley Eades

San Francisco literary festival Litquake just keeps growing: Now in its 12th year, Litquake spans nine days and features 848 authors.

Photo: A crowd gathers in a Mission District laundry mat for Loads of Prose, a Lit Crawl event. Credit: Shelley Eades

Tiny parks are on a roll in San Francisco: Two dumpsters full of greenery, with four more to come, add a bit of nature to the streets of a paved-over downtown neighborhood. Some scoff, but others are willing to give the “parkmobiles” a go.
Photo: Dave Vetrano takes a coffee break at a parkmobile in San Francisco’s South of Market district. Credit: Mark Boster / Los Angeles Times

Tiny parks are on a roll in San Francisco: Two dumpsters full of greenery, with four more to come, add a bit of nature to the streets of a paved-over downtown neighborhood. Some scoff, but others are willing to give the “parkmobiles” a go.

Photo: Dave Vetrano takes a coffee break at a parkmobile in San Francisco’s South of Market district. Credit: Mark Boster / Los Angeles Times