As far as I can tell, a young adult novel is a regular novel that people actually read.
latimesbooks:

Carol M. Highsmith is documenting America as we live now. Among her more than 25,000 photos at the Library of Congress are, luckily, lots of libraries. Here are a few. (via Remarkable libraries across America - latimes.com)

Including downtown L.A.’s Central Library, among the likes of the Peabody Library and the Library of Congress.

latimesbooks:

Carol M. Highsmith is documenting America as we live now. Among her more than 25,000 photos at the Library of Congress are, luckily, lots of libraries. Here are a few. (via Remarkable libraries across America - latimes.com)

Including downtown L.A.’s Central Library, among the likes of the Peabody Library and the Library of Congress.

test reblogged from latimesbooks

Escaping the city for the middle of nowhere, with tens of thousands of books

Partners for 35 years, Polly Hinds and Lynda German left Denver thirteen years ago in search of a quieter life, and they found it in isolated Sweetwater Station, Wyoming.

Not content to keep busy with the upkeep of dozens of farm animals, the two started a mammoth rare book store, with 70,000 titles up for sale. 

Their hands filthy from chores, the two veteran booksellers carry armloads of hard-bound volumes, careful not to dirty the historical tomes and two Zane Grey works of fiction, “The Last Ranger” and “Last of the Great Scouts.” The words scrawled in red on a storage shed explain the contrast: “BOOKS FOR SALE.”

Thirteen years ago, the pair fled Denver following a bizarre altercation with police, looking for a quieter life. They found it here on a deserted ranch 40 miles from the nearest store…

Read the full story from reporter John M. Glionna here.

Photos: Mel Melcon / Los Angeles Times

digg:

How many have you read?

Anyone have an exciting read lined up for the weekend?

digg:

How many have you read?

Anyone have an exciting read lined up for the weekend?

test reblogged from wnyc

Happy birthday, Kurt Vonnegut

The legendary author, who passed away in 2007, would have turned 91 years old today. And what better way to remember him than to pick up a copy of his work, as David L. Ulin did a few years ago, to rediscover why “Slaughterhouse-Five” meant so much during his youth.

I first read the novel, after all, in this very house, when I was 12 or 13. To return to it 36 years later was to confront viscerally the central point of the book, which is that time is not a continuum but a collection of simultaneous moments, that everything we have ever done and everything we will ever do co-exists within us all at once.

Photos: Jill Krementz / Associated Press, Jennifer S. Altman / For the Times, Frank Espich / The Indianapolis Star

The Los Angeles Times’ Summer Reading Guide
There’s something special about summer reading, turning the pages against the breeze while basking in the sun, or filling up hours usually occupied by school with that list of novels you’ve been telling yourself you’d get to eventually.
It’s in that spirit that the Times has built its summer reading guide, a perfect starting point for those of all ages looking to cozy up with a book.
So check out our listings in their entirety here, and see if there’s anything new that sparks your interest, or enjoy the affirmation of seeing something you were already planning on reading on the list (we’re particularly excited for Marisha Pessl’s “Night Film”).

The Los Angeles Times’ Summer Reading Guide

There’s something special about summer reading, turning the pages against the breeze while basking in the sun, or filling up hours usually occupied by school with that list of novels you’ve been telling yourself you’d get to eventually.

It’s in that spirit that the Times has built its summer reading guide, a perfect starting point for those of all ages looking to cozy up with a book.

So check out our listings in their entirety here, and see if there’s anything new that sparks your interest, or enjoy the affirmation of seeing something you were already planning on reading on the list (we’re particularly excited for Marisha Pessl’s “Night Film”).

Longreads: Celebrating Four Years of Longreads

longreads:

image

Longreads just celebrated its fourth birthday, and it’s been a thrill to watch this community grow since we introduced this service and Twitter hashtag in 2009. Thank you to everyone who participates, whether it’s as a reader, a publisher, a writer—or all three. And thanks to the

In case you were in need of some more long reads to add to your queue…

test reblogged from longreads

lareviewofbooks:

Come visit the Los Angeles Review of Books at the Los Angeles Times Festival of Books!  You can find us this weekend at our booth, number 26, located in the Trousdale Parkway on the USC campus. This is your chance to not only meet the staff that makes the Review possible, but to pick up a copy of our beautiful new print edition magazine: a selection of our best interviews and author questionnaires. Bring your friends, and we hope to see you there.

lareviewofbooks:

Come visit the Los Angeles Review of Books at the Los Angeles Times Festival of Books!  You can find us this weekend at our booth, number 26, located in the Trousdale Parkway on the USC campus. This is your chance to not only meet the staff that makes the Review possible, but to pick up a copy of our beautiful new print edition magazine: a selection of our best interviews and author questionnaires. Bring your friends, and we hope to see you there.

test reblogged from lareviewofbooks

The intersections between Los Angeles and literature
Yesterday marked the debut of our Literary L.A. feature, which highlights literary hotspots across the city. Want to go where Ray Bradbury wrote “Fahrenheit 451” on a type writer fueled by dimes? We have you covered.
And of course, the tool’s a work-in-progress, so send over your feedback on authors, works or mentions you’d like to see included!
Check out the tool here, or get psyched for this weekend’s Festival of Books, running from April 20-21 at the USC Campus.

The intersections between Los Angeles and literature

Yesterday marked the debut of our Literary L.A. feature, which highlights literary hotspots across the city. Want to go where Ray Bradbury wrote “Fahrenheit 451” on a type writer fueled by dimes? We have you covered.

And of course, the tool’s a work-in-progress, so send over your feedback on authors, works or mentions you’d like to see included!

Check out the tool here, or get psyched for this weekend’s Festival of Books, running from April 20-21 at the USC Campus.

Maurice Sendak’s work hits the road
An exhibition featuring the work of the late beloved children’s author Sendak will be making its debut at the Bowers Museum in Santa Ana, as part of the 50th anniversary celebrations for his landmark book “Where the Wild Things Are.”
Featured are drawings and images relating to his work, but also some early, previously unseen work:

There are eight signed watercolor and ink illustrations of scenes from William Shakespeare’s “Macbeth” that he made as a 16-year-old in Brooklyn who wanted to avoid flunking English. Leigh said Sendak’s teacher couldn’t get him to speak up in class or write essays, but she’d noticed he was always drawing and told him he could earn a grade with his artwork.

Read more about the exhibition, and keep tabs on future locations here.

Maurice Sendak’s work hits the road

An exhibition featuring the work of the late beloved children’s author Sendak will be making its debut at the Bowers Museum in Santa Ana, as part of the 50th anniversary celebrations for his landmark book “Where the Wild Things Are.”

Featured are drawings and images relating to his work, but also some early, previously unseen work:

There are eight signed watercolor and ink illustrations of scenes from William Shakespeare’s “Macbeth” that he made as a 16-year-old in Brooklyn who wanted to avoid flunking English. Leigh said Sendak’s teacher couldn’t get him to speak up in class or write essays, but she’d noticed he was always drawing and told him he could earn a grade with his artwork.

Read more about the exhibition, and keep tabs on future locations here.

2012 L.A. Times Book Prize Finalists announced

Biographer Robert Caro, novelist Michael Chabon and cartoonist Chris Ware are among the fifty authors whose books were announced as the Times’ finalists for the 33rd annual Book Prizes.

Also nominated are Nate Silver for “The Signal and the Noise,” U.S. poet laureate Louise Glück and Katherine Boo for “Behind the Beautiful Forevers.”

Think anyone was left off of the list? Sound off below!