From the Times photo archives:

April 26, 1964: An unconcerned rabbit nonchalantly keeps pace with a high-speed sports car driven by Dick Guldstrand of Manhattan Beach during the 125-mile manufacturer’s race Sunday at Riverside Raceway. Guldstrand finished fifth in the auto race. Rabbit was bored and dropped out.

Photo: Cal Montney / Los Angeles Times

From the Times photo archives:

April 26, 1964: An unconcerned rabbit nonchalantly keeps pace with a high-speed sports car driven by Dick Guldstrand of Manhattan Beach during the 125-mile manufacturer’s race Sunday at Riverside Raceway. Guldstrand finished fifth in the auto race. Rabbit was bored and dropped out.

Photo: Cal Montney / Los Angeles Times

The center of the hot rod universe

Pomona, home to the highest-profile hot rod races and shows in the world, boasts a culture of speed like no other. It’s not about haphazzard late night drag racing, but the display of well-honed hot rods, some costing up to hundreds of thousands of dollars to build.

It’s the engine that drives not just those who drive over to the city for events like the National Roadster Show, but the local economy, with an estimated 3,600 jobs depending on the continuation of hot rod traditions.

Read more on Pomona, and one team’s struggle to get a restructured 1932 Ford back up and running, here.

Photos: Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times