The events in Ferguson reminded us that we cannot allow tensions, which are present in so many neighborhoods across America, to go unresolved. As law enforcement leaders, each of us has an essential obligation and a unique opportunity to ensure fairness, eliminate bias, and build community engagement.
If a white male teen was involved in same kind of scenario, then from top to bottom the outcome & aftermath might’ve been different.
Filipino nurses settle language-bias case: The $975,000 secured in a dispute with Delano Regional Medical Center is believed to be the largest such settlement in the U.S. healthcare industry.

During a 2006 mandatory meeting for Filipino staffers, nurses were told they were forbidden from using their native language at “any time in the hospital,” said Wilma Lamug, a former 10-year employee.
She said the hospital’s former chief executive vowed that “he would install surveillance cameras in nursing stations. Whoever is caught, they were threatened with suspension or termination,” Lamug said. “Sometimes, we were speaking English, but due to our accent and diction, they thought we were speaking something else.”
Although the hospital, near Bakersfield, employed a mix of bilingual employees speaking Spanish, Hindi, Bengali and other languages, managers targeted only the Filipinos and encouraged supervisors and other staffers to “act as vigilantes.”

Photo: Nurse Wilma Lamug is overcome with emotion as she recounts the discrimination she and other Filipino nurses experienced while working at the Delano Regional Medical Center in Delano, Calif. Credit: Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times

Filipino nurses settle language-bias case: The $975,000 secured in a dispute with Delano Regional Medical Center is believed to be the largest such settlement in the U.S. healthcare industry.

During a 2006 mandatory meeting for Filipino staffers, nurses were told they were forbidden from using their native language at “any time in the hospital,” said Wilma Lamug, a former 10-year employee.

She said the hospital’s former chief executive vowed that “he would install surveillance cameras in nursing stations. Whoever is caught, they were threatened with suspension or termination,” Lamug said. “Sometimes, we were speaking English, but due to our accent and diction, they thought we were speaking something else.”

Although the hospital, near Bakersfield, employed a mix of bilingual employees speaking Spanish, Hindi, Bengali and other languages, managers targeted only the Filipinos and encouraged supervisors and other staffers to “act as vigilantes.”

Photo: Nurse Wilma Lamug is overcome with emotion as she recounts the discrimination she and other Filipino nurses experienced while working at the Delano Regional Medical Center in Delano, Calif. Credit: Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times

UC struggles with bias claims raised by Jews, Muslims: Some Muslim students feel their rights are being suppressed and some Jewish students think anti-Israel protests on campus have become anti-Semitic.
UC students and others — how welcome do you feel at your school?
Photo: Participants at a 2011 protest tape their mouths to illustrate what they believe is a 1st Amendment issue involving 11 Muslim demonstrators accused of disrupting a speech by the Israeli ambassador at UC Irvine. Credit: Mark Boster / Los Angeles Times

UC struggles with bias claims raised by Jews, Muslims: Some Muslim students feel their rights are being suppressed and some Jewish students think anti-Israel protests on campus have become anti-Semitic.

UC students and others — how welcome do you feel at your school?

Photo: Participants at a 2011 protest tape their mouths to illustrate what they believe is a 1st Amendment issue involving 11 Muslim demonstrators accused of disrupting a speech by the Israeli ambassador at UC Irvine. Credit: Mark Boster / Los Angeles Times

Recovered tombstone gives L.A. a chance to honor a piece of its past: The headstone for the grave of abolitionist John Brown’s son was missing for 10 years. Recently it was found, but the grave is on private land. Now what?

Before I started on this story, I had no idea that Southern California had a Civil War past, much less what it might be. Moreover, I was startled to hear that Pasadena had any part in the fight for racial equality.

Last sentence of that graf:

Photo: Artist Ian White found the long-missing gravestone of abolitionist John Brown’s son Owen, who moved to the Pasadena area in the 1800s. The stone had disappeared 10 years ago amid a legal battle over giving the public a way to visit his Altadena ridge-top burial site. Credit: Gary Friedman / Los Angeles Times

Recovered tombstone gives L.A. a chance to honor a piece of its past: The headstone for the grave of abolitionist John Brown’s son was missing for 10 years. Recently it was found, but the grave is on private land. Now what?

Before I started on this story, I had no idea that Southern California had a Civil War past, much less what it might be. Moreover, I was startled to hear that Pasadena had any part in the fight for racial equality.

Last sentence of that graf:

Photo: Artist Ian White found the long-missing gravestone of abolitionist John Brown’s son Owen, who moved to the Pasadena area in the 1800s. The stone had disappeared 10 years ago amid a legal battle over giving the public a way to visit his Altadena ridge-top burial site. Credit: Gary Friedman / Los Angeles Times

In North Carolina, Latinos gain in political importance: The state’s small but fast-growing population poses an increasing threat to Republicans.
A look at a political issue through the lens of a family with both undocumented immigrants and citizens. 
Photo: Jesus Martinez Jr., with his daughter, Camila, will turn 18 a month before the November election. He’s not a fan of President Obama, but plans to vote for him anyway to speak for his family. Credit: Hector Becerra / Los Angeles Times

In North Carolina, Latinos gain in political importance: The state’s small but fast-growing population poses an increasing threat to Republicans.

A look at a political issue through the lens of a family with both undocumented immigrants and citizens. 

Photo: Jesus Martinez Jr., with his daughter, Camila, will turn 18 a month before the November election. He’s not a fan of President Obama, but plans to vote for him anyway to speak for his family. Credit: Hector Becerra / Los Angeles Times

Race and the presidential race

A debate is percolating over whether the Mitt Romney campaign has tried to stoke racial resentments, primarily through television ads attacking the Obama administration over welfare policy. Republican leaders deny it. President Obama and his aides have been largely silent on the issue.

Op-Ed: Obama's slave link

Tracing a line from the first black slave to the first black president.

"Two of the most historically significant African Americans in the history of our country are amazingly directly related," declared genealogist Joseph Shumway. "John Punch was more than likely the genesis of legalized slavery in America. But after centuries of suffering, the Civil War and decades of civil rights efforts, his 11th great-grandson became the leader of the free world and the ultimate realization of the American dream."

Epithet that divides Mexicans is banned by Oxnard school district: “Oaxaquita” (little Oaxacan) is used by other Mexicans to demean their indigenous compatriots — who are estimated to make up 30% of California’s farmworkers.

Educators and others in the U.S. often don’t recognize diversity within the Mexican community, said Gaspar Rivera-Salgado, a researcher at the UCLA Labor Center who has written extensively about indigenous Mexican migration.
"We forget that it’s a multilingual, multiethnic community," he said. "We forget about the fact that 62 indigenous languages are spoken in Mexico."
The organizing project’s campaign, Rivera-Salgado said, “is a really interesting way to confront, very directly, something that the Mexican nation and the Mexican immigrant community sometimes sweeps under the rug, and that’s the prevalence of racism and discrimination that indigenous people have to endure in Mexico and that is reproduced here in the United States.”

Photo: Abelardo Popec, left, and Romaldo Lopez listen to speakers as indigenous Mexican students and leaders of Ventura County public schools launched the “No Me Llames Oaxaquita” (Don’t call me little Oaxacan) campaign at the Center for Employment Training in Oxnard. Credit: Anne Cusack / Los Angeles Times

Epithet that divides Mexicans is banned by Oxnard school district: “Oaxaquita” (little Oaxacan) is used by other Mexicans to demean their indigenous compatriots — who are estimated to make up 30% of California’s farmworkers.

Educators and others in the U.S. often don’t recognize diversity within the Mexican community, said Gaspar Rivera-Salgado, a researcher at the UCLA Labor Center who has written extensively about indigenous Mexican migration.

"We forget that it’s a multilingual, multiethnic community," he said. "We forget about the fact that 62 indigenous languages are spoken in Mexico."

The organizing project’s campaign, Rivera-Salgado said, “is a really interesting way to confront, very directly, something that the Mexican nation and the Mexican immigrant community sometimes sweeps under the rug, and that’s the prevalence of racism and discrimination that indigenous people have to endure in Mexico and that is reproduced here in the United States.”

Photo: Abelardo Popec, left, and Romaldo Lopez listen to speakers as indigenous Mexican students and leaders of Ventura County public schools launched the “No Me Llames Oaxaquita” (Don’t call me little Oaxacan) campaign at the Center for Employment Training in Oxnard. Credit: Anne Cusack / Los Angeles Times

Updating historical San Gabriel pageant will take some doing: The “Mission Play” was wildly popular in the early 20th century. It was full of stereotypes, but some Indian performers have fond memories. The adapter aims to depict diverse groups more authentically.
Photo: Photos from the “Mission Play” are displayed as Stella Rojas shares iced tea and memories with two other women who performed in a 1947 revival. Credit: Francine Orr / Los Angeles Times

Updating historical San Gabriel pageant will take some doing: The “Mission Play” was wildly popular in the early 20th century. It was full of stereotypes, but some Indian performers have fond memories. The adapter aims to depict diverse groups more authentically.

Photo: Photos from the “Mission Play” are displayed as Stella Rojas shares iced tea and memories with two other women who performed in a 1947 revival. Credit: Francine Orr / Los Angeles Times

In the egg donation market, Asian women rule

The high prices reflect growing demand and a shortage of willing donors. Asian women can get about $10,000 to $20,000 for their eggs, while women of other ethnic groups typically get about $6,000.

One reason for the lack of supply is that Asian women are less likely to go through the discomfort of egg donations out of financial need. On average, Asian women earn higher salaries and are more likely to be college-educated than their counterparts in other racial groups, according to Labor Department statistics. Asian females out-earn white women by 13%, black women by 31% and Latinas by 52%, the agency said.

FYI, Jewish women are also in high demand.

Steady hands, determination saved Reginald Denny as L.A. burned: Working on a multiracial team to save a white truck driver who was beaten during the L.A. riots was a defining moment for Madison Richardson, a surgeon and black man who was taught that race shouldn’t matter.
Photo: For 20 years, Dr. Madison Richardson has kept photographs, such as this one of Reginald Denny shortly after he arrived at the hospital, and other items from the L.A. riots. He’s even kept a Christmas card signed “Love, Reggie.” Credit: Genaro Molina / Los Angeles Times

Steady hands, determination saved Reginald Denny as L.A. burned: Working on a multiracial team to save a white truck driver who was beaten during the L.A. riots was a defining moment for Madison Richardson, a surgeon and black man who was taught that race shouldn’t matter.

Photo: For 20 years, Dr. Madison Richardson has kept photographs, such as this one of Reginald Denny shortly after he arrived at the hospital, and other items from the L.A. riots. He’s even kept a Christmas card signed “Love, Reggie.” Credit: Genaro Molina / Los Angeles Times

For black parents in Pasadena, shootings give fresh relevance to ‘The Talk’: The fatal shootings of Kendrec McDade in Pasadena and a black teen in Florida renew the painful generations-old discussion about the need to swallow one’s anger and pride when dealing with the police.

In Pasadena, such conversations unfold against the backdrop of a long, fraught racial history. This is the place where baseball legend Jackie Robinson grew up, and left in disgust.
"We saw movies from segregated balconies, swam in a municipal pool only on Tuesdays, and were permitted in the YWCA one night a week," Robinson wrote about the city’s treatment of blacks. "In certain respects, Pasadenans were less understanding than Southerners and even more hostile."

Photo: Barber Luke Walker, an Arkansas native, washes Davan Smith’s hair at his shop in Pasadena. Credit: Francine Orr / Los Angeles Times

For black parents in Pasadena, shootings give fresh relevance to ‘The Talk’: The fatal shootings of Kendrec McDade in Pasadena and a black teen in Florida renew the painful generations-old discussion about the need to swallow one’s anger and pride when dealing with the police.

In Pasadena, such conversations unfold against the backdrop of a long, fraught racial history. This is the place where baseball legend Jackie Robinson grew up, and left in disgust.

"We saw movies from segregated balconies, swam in a municipal pool only on Tuesdays, and were permitted in the YWCA one night a week," Robinson wrote about the city’s treatment of blacks. "In certain respects, Pasadenans were less understanding than Southerners and even more hostile."

Photo: Barber Luke Walker, an Arkansas native, washes Davan Smith’s hair at his shop in Pasadena. Credit: Francine Orr / Los Angeles Times

LAPD officer profiled Latinos in traffic stops, internal probe concludes

alexandraerin:

latimes:

A white police officer has been targeting Latino drivers for traffic stops because of their race, a Los Angeles Police Department investigation concluded — marking the first time the agency has found one of its officers guilty of racial profiling.

I’m so glad they found the guy who’s been doing this.

^ This comment. Hah! ^

Here’s some more info from today’s story

  • The officer, identified as 15-year veteran Patrick Smith, 55, was relieved of duty but has not been fired. In L.A., the police chief cannot fire an officer unilaterally. A three-person board will hear the case and decide if firing is warranted. 
  • 250 formal allegations of racial profiling are brought against LAPD officers every year. Because cases hinge on what officers are thinking in the moment they make a stop, these allegations are very difficult to prove.
  • That explanation wore increasingly thin on members of the Police Commission, who put more pressure on the LAPD to overhaul its investigation of racial profiling cases.

So what was the key evidence on Patrick Smith? According to sources, he is accused of deliberately misidentifying some Latinos as being white on his reports — presumably in an effort to conceal their ethnicity.

There are more details on LAPD racial profiling studies and the Department of Justice’s involvement following the Rampart scandal over at the story.

test reblogged from blue-author

Officer engaged in racial profiling, LAPD finds

A white police officer targeted Latino drivers for traffic stops because of their race, a Los Angeles Police Department investigation concluded — marking the first time the agency has found one of its officers guilty of racial profiling.