We tortured some folks.
I beg my colleagues to sit down and let’s work this out. Veterans are dying. This is not a policy, academic issue here. This is the very lives of the men and women who are serving.
Thirty years ago tonight, Geraldine Ferraro made history by becoming the first woman ever to be a presidential or vice presidential nominee.
Photo: Associated Press

Thirty years ago tonight, Geraldine Ferraro made history by becoming the first woman ever to be a presidential or vice presidential nominee.

Photo: Associated Press

It came out of nowhere. It was a stunning, unimaginable, impossible defeat.
We don’t own the moon! We don’t need a national park on the moon even if we did.

Gentrification forcing some L.A. gangs to commute to their turf

Los Angeles’ Echo Park, once a familiar stomping ground for the area’s gangs, has recently been hit with a wave of gentrification, with boutiques, coffee shops and rent increases displacing gang members.

Pushed out by this activity, many have been commuting to their turf only on the weekends, rapidly diminishing gang activity in the area. And now an injunction has been placed on Echo Park gangs, prohibiting them from congregating in a “safety zone” that envelops the neighborhood - even if they already live within its boundaries.

Officials praise it as a tool to make the neighborhood safer, but some residents say it places an unfair focus on minorities.

"The cops creep by and give me a look," said Salvador Aguirre, an Echo Park native who protested the injunction this summer.

"Being bald and Mexican American, we’re all looked at the same. We’re all the problems. I don’t want to be looked at twice."

Read reporter Marisa Gerber’s full story here.

Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times

latimespast:

"Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb” was released 50 years ago this week. The film is regarded as a cinematic masterpiece today (AFI ranked it No. 39 in its’ 10th anniversary Top 100 in 2007), but in February 1964, Times’ film editor Philip K. Scheuer didn’t find much to like. I’m partial to the deadpan of the subheadline: "Kubrick’s ‘Satire’ Tells All About End of World, Ha Ha." But this is a great line too:

… a publicist at Columbia, which is distributing the picture, assured me it would be my “cup of tea.” After suffering through two screenings of “Dr. Strangelove,” I would sooner drink hemlock.

Scheuer issues no spoiler alerts while giving away the ending and laments that “[a]ll members of our armed forces are pictured as either utterly unscrupulous or just plain stupid.”
And then he makes a point that is rather jarring to a reader in today’s era of the antihero. 

Is all this necessary? I submit that, as with “[It’s a Mad, Mad, Mad,] Mad World,” villains are not funny per se — especially when there are no good guys around to offset them.

Scheuer doesn’t spare the actors either.

Peter Sellers plays three parts, all in widely disparate make-up: the President, an RAF exchange officer and Dr. Strangelove, a Nazi fanatic employed as our top nuclear scientist. His bumbling Briton comes through; the others are, with all due respect to his talent for mimicry, simply preposterous. George C. Scott (I have never seen him give a bad performance till now) makes the staff chairman — Gen. Buck Turgidson — a mugging, stomach-scratching, gum-chewing vulgarian.

That’s Peter Sellers above, later in 1964. He’d had a heart attack and was photographed leaving the hospital with his wife.
— Matt Ballinger
Original published caption, May 8, 1964: GOING HOME — British comedian Peter Sellers, 38, stricken with a heart attack April 6 that almost cost him his life, gets a hug from his Swedish actress wife, Britt Eklund, 21, as he leaves Cedars of Lebanon Hospital on an ambulance litter Thursday. Credit: Los Angeles Times

latimespast:

"Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb” was released 50 years ago this week. The film is regarded as a cinematic masterpiece today (AFI ranked it No. 39 in its’ 10th anniversary Top 100 in 2007), but in February 1964, Times’ film editor Philip K. Scheuer didn’t find much to like. I’m partial to the deadpan of the subheadline: "Kubrick’s ‘Satire’ Tells All About End of World, Ha Ha." But this is a great line too:

… a publicist at Columbia, which is distributing the picture, assured me it would be my “cup of tea.” After suffering through two screenings of “Dr. Strangelove,” I would sooner drink hemlock.

Scheuer issues no spoiler alerts while giving away the ending and laments that “[a]ll members of our armed forces are pictured as either utterly unscrupulous or just plain stupid.”

And then he makes a point that is rather jarring to a reader in today’s era of the antihero. 

Is all this necessary? I submit that, as with “[It’s a Mad, Mad, Mad,] Mad World,” villains are not funny per se — especially when there are no good guys around to offset them.

Scheuer doesn’t spare the actors either.

Peter Sellers plays three parts, all in widely disparate make-up: the President, an RAF exchange officer and Dr. Strangelove, a Nazi fanatic employed as our top nuclear scientist. His bumbling Briton comes through; the others are, with all due respect to his talent for mimicry, simply preposterous. George C. Scott (I have never seen him give a bad performance till now) makes the staff chairman — Gen. Buck Turgidson — a mugging, stomach-scratching, gum-chewing vulgarian.

That’s Peter Sellers above, later in 1964. He’d had a heart attack and was photographed leaving the hospital with his wife.

Matt Ballinger

Original published caption, May 8, 1964: GOING HOME — British comedian Peter Sellers, 38, stricken with a heart attack April 6 that almost cost him his life, gets a hug from his Swedish actress wife, Britt Eklund, 21, as he leaves Cedars of Lebanon Hospital on an ambulance litter Thursday. Credit: Los Angeles Times

test reblogged from latimespast

If you ever do that to me again, I’ll throw you off this [bleeping] balcony … You’re not man enough. I’ll break you in half. Like a boy.

State of the Union 2014

President Obama will deliver his sixth State of the Union address tonight at 6:00 p.m. PST, in an attempt to once again rally the nation around his second term agenda, and break through Washington’s partisan gridlock.

But given the political climate, and the upcoming elections, Obama faces an uphill battle, no matter how lofty his rhetoric may be.

We’ll be posting intermittent updates here, but you can watch Obama’s speech, and keep tabs on the nation’s reactions, on Politics Now.

Or, for the historically minded, take a stroll through the most important moments of previous State of the Union addresses.

UPDATE:

Calling for a “year of action,” President Obama asked for Democrats and Republicans to work together to aid an improving economy and continue gains made on energy reform.

But if not, Obama has pledged to employ executive actions to push as much of his agenda through as he can.

Obama hopes to capitalize on the division to push other populist elements of what he has labeled his economic inequality agenda. He plans to push Congress to expand unemployment benefits for the long-term jobless and tout new commitments from chief executives of corporations who’d agreed not discriminate against applicants because of extended stretches out of work.

The president intends to speed up implementation of the ConnectEd program, his plan to connect all schools to the digital universe. Aides did not detail how the government would pay for this.

Obama also will create a new “starter savings account” to help people who don’t have 401(k) plans or pensions to save for retirement. An economic advisor said this would involve a new U.S. Treasury product eventually available for purchase on the private market.

Other initiatives would require approval from Congress, if they’re to take effect.

Photos: Kristoffer Tripplaar / Getty Images, Los Angeles Times, Charles Dharapak / Los Angeles Times

Folk musician, activist Pete Seeger has passed away at age 94

"At some point, Pete Seeger decided he’d be a walking, singing reminder of all of America’s history," Bruce Springsteen said at a Madison Square Garden concert marking Seeger’s 90th birthday in 2009. “He’d be a living archive of America’s music and conscience, a testament to the power of song and culture to nudge history along, to push American events towards more humane and justified ends.”

Above is Seeger performing the classic “Michael, Row the Boat Ashore.” For our full obituary, head here.

Progress made in talks to end Ukraine protests

President Viktor Yanukovich has offered amnesty for protesters arrested, pledged to reshuffle his government and alter strict laws against public demonstrations as part of a proposed deal with his political opposition continuing their protests in the capital of Kiev.

But so far, no definite deal has been reached in the ongoing negotiations between the government and protest leaders.

Read the full story over at World Now.

Photos: Sergei Supinsky, Volodymyr Shuvayev / AFP/Getty Images, Sergei Grits / Associated Press

We have not identified a single instance involving a threat to the United States in which the telephone records program made a concrete difference in the outcome of a counterterrorism investigation.

Rapid escalation of clashes in Kiev

Three demonstrators have been killed in the Ukrainian capitol of Kiev, as protesters and police hunker down amid the debate over whether the country should build closer ties to the European Union.

The country’s government, led by prime minister Mykola Azarov, has sought to legitimize protesters by force and by law, enacting harsh restrictions on the right for demonstrations.

Follow the latest on the protests over at World Now.

Photos: Sergei Grits, Darko Vojinovic / Associated Press, Sergei Supinsky / AFP/Getty Images