Recapping the 125th Tournament of Roses Parade

Adorned with the requisite array of colors, yesterday’s Rose Parade was a joy to watch - and it even had a float-bound marriage ceremony to boot!

Check out all of our coverage of the parade right here.

Photos: Allen J. Schaben, Rick Loomis, Brian Van Der Brug / Los Angeles Times

Recovered tombstone gives L.A. a chance to honor a piece of its past: The headstone for the grave of abolitionist John Brown’s son was missing for 10 years. Recently it was found, but the grave is on private land. Now what?

Before I started on this story, I had no idea that Southern California had a Civil War past, much less what it might be. Moreover, I was startled to hear that Pasadena had any part in the fight for racial equality.

Last sentence of that graf:

Photo: Artist Ian White found the long-missing gravestone of abolitionist John Brown’s son Owen, who moved to the Pasadena area in the 1800s. The stone had disappeared 10 years ago amid a legal battle over giving the public a way to visit his Altadena ridge-top burial site. Credit: Gary Friedman / Los Angeles Times

Recovered tombstone gives L.A. a chance to honor a piece of its past: The headstone for the grave of abolitionist John Brown’s son was missing for 10 years. Recently it was found, but the grave is on private land. Now what?

Before I started on this story, I had no idea that Southern California had a Civil War past, much less what it might be. Moreover, I was startled to hear that Pasadena had any part in the fight for racial equality.

Last sentence of that graf:

Photo: Artist Ian White found the long-missing gravestone of abolitionist John Brown’s son Owen, who moved to the Pasadena area in the 1800s. The stone had disappeared 10 years ago amid a legal battle over giving the public a way to visit his Altadena ridge-top burial site. Credit: Gary Friedman / Los Angeles Times

One Day on the Gold Line (Pasadena Weekly)

tumblangeles:

“So I leave Union Station, get on the Gold Line and am gazing out the window when an LA County Sheriff’s deputy asks me for my ticket. I dig for my Metro Day Pass in the usual chaos of my bag. He barks at me to “keep looking” then says, “give me your driver’s license,” which I do immediately. I find the receipt for the pass that indicated the date and time I bought it. I show it to the deputy, who gestures impatiently for me to follow him off the train. “That’s not good enough; you can show it in court.” I’m not eager to go to court or pay a fine: “Wait, please don’t cite me. I can find the pass; I know I have it.” “You’ll have a much worse day if you don’t get off right now,” he shouts, and I get right off. As I exit, I hear the crackle of a two-way radio. Sheriff’s deputies immediately surround me — brown uniforms loom over me, blocking the view of the 4 p.m. rush of passengers swirling around the station. I start to look for my pass, but a female deputy orders, “Get up, put your hands there.” “What, you are going to search me?” The words fly out before I can think, but I immediately put my arms on the pillar. She searches me, shoving her hands roughly around my body, my breasts, around my waist and down under my underwear. I’ve never been patted down before, other than at the airport, and never this aggressively. Instinctively, I react to her hands jerking around my body, poking and grabbing. “Stop — you’re hurting me,” I cry and pull to the side. Within a second, she bounces my head — SLAM, SLAM, SLAM — against the pillar, simultaneously snapping handcuffs behind my back. I both hear and feel a loud crunch — impact of bone hitting hard surface. For a moment, I genuinely think I’m just having a bad dream.”

Read this. Then read these:

  • Sandy Banks: Where was help for Alesia? “Alesia Thomas left her two children, 12 and 3, outside a police station in Southeast Los Angeles in the middle of the night. When LAPD officers went to her apartment to find out why, she told them she was addicted to drugs and couldn’t take care of the kids. They tried to place her under arrest but she ‘actively resisted’ and a struggle ensued. A short time later, she was dead.”
  • L.A. County jail abuse panel blasts Sheriff Lee Baca, aides: Special investigators with a blue-ribbon commission examining abuse of inmates call the sheriff an out-of-touch leader who failed to hold staff accountable.

test reblogged from tumblangeles

Muslim American summer camp blends faith and fun: Camp Izza in Pasadena and Irvine aims to help Muslim children take pride in their culture and faith. The summer includes prayers and Koran recitation as well as water balloons and scavenger hunts.
Photo: Campers and counselors play indoor sports at Camp Izza’s Irvine location, the New Horizon school campus. Credit: Irfan Khan / Los Angeles Times

Muslim American summer camp blends faith and fun: Camp Izza in Pasadena and Irvine aims to help Muslim children take pride in their culture and faith. The summer includes prayers and Koran recitation as well as water balloons and scavenger hunts.

Photo: Campers and counselors play indoor sports at Camp Izza’s Irvine location, the New Horizon school campus. Credit: Irfan Khan / Los Angeles Times

Review: ‘History of Space Photography’ is out of this world: For the exhibition at Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, curator Jay Belloli worked with consultants from the Jet Propulsion Lab.
I can see forever…
Photo: An infrared photograph of Helix Nebula in deep space, part of “The History of Space Photography” at Art Center College. Credit: Art Center College of Design

Review: ‘History of Space Photography’ is out of this world: For the exhibition at Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, curator Jay Belloli worked with consultants from the Jet Propulsion Lab.

I can see forever…

Photo: An infrared photograph of Helix Nebula in deep space, part of “The History of Space Photography” at Art Center College. Credit: Art Center College of Design

For black parents in Pasadena, shootings give fresh relevance to ‘The Talk’: The fatal shootings of Kendrec McDade in Pasadena and a black teen in Florida renew the painful generations-old discussion about the need to swallow one’s anger and pride when dealing with the police.

In Pasadena, such conversations unfold against the backdrop of a long, fraught racial history. This is the place where baseball legend Jackie Robinson grew up, and left in disgust.
"We saw movies from segregated balconies, swam in a municipal pool only on Tuesdays, and were permitted in the YWCA one night a week," Robinson wrote about the city’s treatment of blacks. "In certain respects, Pasadenans were less understanding than Southerners and even more hostile."

Photo: Barber Luke Walker, an Arkansas native, washes Davan Smith’s hair at his shop in Pasadena. Credit: Francine Orr / Los Angeles Times

For black parents in Pasadena, shootings give fresh relevance to ‘The Talk’: The fatal shootings of Kendrec McDade in Pasadena and a black teen in Florida renew the painful generations-old discussion about the need to swallow one’s anger and pride when dealing with the police.

In Pasadena, such conversations unfold against the backdrop of a long, fraught racial history. This is the place where baseball legend Jackie Robinson grew up, and left in disgust.

"We saw movies from segregated balconies, swam in a municipal pool only on Tuesdays, and were permitted in the YWCA one night a week," Robinson wrote about the city’s treatment of blacks. "In certain respects, Pasadenans were less understanding than Southerners and even more hostile."

Photo: Barber Luke Walker, an Arkansas native, washes Davan Smith’s hair at his shop in Pasadena. Credit: Francine Orr / Los Angeles Times

Vintage eyeglasses provide clear path to Hollywood: Russ Campbell isn’t a big-shot producer or a studio honcho. He’s the owner of Old Focals, a vintage eyewear store in Pasadena that over the last 21/2 decades has supplied glasses for movies, television and commercial productions.
Photo: Russ Campbell. Credit: Gary Friedman / Los Angeles Times

Vintage eyeglasses provide clear path to Hollywood: Russ Campbell isn’t a big-shot producer or a studio honcho. He’s the owner of Old Focals, a vintage eyewear store in Pasadena that over the last 21/2 decades has supplied glasses for movies, television and commercial productions.

Photo: Russ Campbell. Credit: Gary Friedman / Los Angeles Times

Pasadena claims its slice of burger history: A slice of cheese, that is. The city launches Pasadena Cheeseburger Week to promote local restaurants and put its name on the invention of a now-ubiquitous American sandwich.
Photo:   According to family legend, Lionel Sternberger invented the cheeseburger in the mid-1920s at this roadside snack stand in Pasadena. Pictured is Lionel’s father, Herman Sternberger. Credit: Family photo / December 31, 1969

Pasadena claims its slice of burger history: A slice of cheese, that is. The city launches Pasadena Cheeseburger Week to promote local restaurants and put its name on the invention of a now-ubiquitous American sandwich.

Photo: According to family legend, Lionel Sternberger invented the cheeseburger in the mid-1920s at this roadside snack stand in Pasadena. Pictured is Lionel’s father, Herman Sternberger. Credit: Family photo / December 31, 1969

Art and science collide at Pasadena gallery:  The ‘Worlds’ exhibit at the Art Center College of Design examines how scientific knowledge shapes our understanding of the world. Meteor rocks, moon portraits and other works are on display.
Photo:  “Liftoff, from The Apollo Prophecies” by Richard Selesnick and Nicholas Kahn is on display at the Alyce de Roulet Williamson Gallery’s “Worlds” exhibit in Pasadena.

Art and science collide at Pasadena gallery: The ‘Worlds’ exhibit at the Art Center College of Design examines how scientific knowledge shapes our understanding of the world. Meteor rocks, moon portraits and other works are on display.

Photo: “Liftoff, from The Apollo Prophecies” by Richard Selesnick and Nicholas Kahn is on display at the Alyce de Roulet Williamson Gallery’s “Worlds” exhibit in Pasadena.

In northwest Pasadena, access to healthful food is limited

Just three supermarkets serve an area with 66,000 people. The Pasadena Public Health Department wants to set up a farmers market there next year.

ladyjanela:

Home Sweet Home.
Southern California Close-Ups: Pasadena and environs
The area has its traditions, including  Craftsman homes, Old Pasadena and the Rose Bowl, its greenery including  Huntington Library, its Asian flare with Vietnamese and Chinese  restaurants, and its fun and funky side at Eagle Rock hangouts.

Photo: Colorado Street Bridge. Credit: Ricardo DeAratanha / Los Angeles Times

ladyjanela:

Home Sweet Home.

Southern California Close-Ups: Pasadena and environs

The area has its traditions, including Craftsman homes, Old Pasadena and the Rose Bowl, its greenery including Huntington Library, its Asian flare with Vietnamese and Chinese restaurants, and its fun and funky side at Eagle Rock hangouts.

Photo: Colorado Street Bridge. Credit: Ricardo DeAratanha / Los Angeles Times

test reblogged from ladyjanela

After nearly two years of planning, prodding and debate, a group of Pasadena residents finally got its big wish: The city let them permanently stick their 18-foot fork in the road.
Photo: File photo of “The Fork in the Road” in Pasadena. Credit: Bob Chamberlin / Los Angeles Times

After nearly two years of planning, prodding and debate, a group of Pasadena residents finally got its big wish: The city let them permanently stick their 18-foot fork in the road.

Photo: File photo of “The Fork in the Road” in Pasadena. Credit: Bob Chamberlin / Los Angeles Times

Marine recruiters reach out at gay pride event in Pasadena: The Marines set up a booth at San Gabriel Valley Pride’s Community Unity Day at Pasadena City College. They were the only military branch to attend.
Photo: Kenny Clark, 17, struggles to complete the last of many pull-ups as Marine Corps recruiter Staff Sgt. George Garcia looks on at the San Gabriel Valley Pride festival at Pasadena City College. Credit: Robert Gauthier / Los Angeles Times

Marine recruiters reach out at gay pride event in Pasadena: The Marines set up a booth at San Gabriel Valley Pride’s Community Unity Day at Pasadena City College. They were the only military branch to attend.

Photo: Kenny Clark, 17, struggles to complete the last of many pull-ups as Marine Corps recruiter Staff Sgt. George Garcia looks on at the San Gabriel Valley Pride festival at Pasadena City College. Credit: Robert Gauthier / Los Angeles Times

A bus ride to enlightenment: Students who were part of the integration of Pasadena’s schools decades ago look back fondly on the lessons they learned.

For Karen Iwamiya, then in the second grade, this meant a trip eastward across Lake Avenue in Altadena, an invisible dividing line separating races and social classes. She traveled from her less-affluent neighborhood to a nicer one, with a nicer school — Noyes Elementary, where black, white, Latino and Asian American kids like her were now all thrown together.
"To me, they were all just my friends," said Iwamiya, who was 7 years old then and blissfully unaware of any controversy surrounding her presence at this new school. "That was the beauty of it. We didn’t know."

Photo:   The third-grade class at Noyes Elementary in Altadena, circa 1971, after a federal judge ordered the Pasadena schools to desegregate.

A bus ride to enlightenment: Students who were part of the integration of Pasadena’s schools decades ago look back fondly on the lessons they learned.

For Karen Iwamiya, then in the second grade, this meant a trip eastward across Lake Avenue in Altadena, an invisible dividing line separating races and social classes. She traveled from her less-affluent neighborhood to a nicer one, with a nicer school — Noyes Elementary, where black, white, Latino and Asian American kids like her were now all thrown together.

"To me, they were all just my friends," said Iwamiya, who was 7 years old then and blissfully unaware of any controversy surrounding her presence at this new school. "That was the beauty of it. We didn’t know."

Photo: The third-grade class at Noyes Elementary in Altadena, circa 1971, after a federal judge ordered the Pasadena schools to desegregate.

Golfer Bill McPhillips seethes at the rain outside of his South Pasadena home in this photo from April 19, 1967. Seems appropriate today.
Photo credit: John Malmin / Los Angeles Times

Golfer Bill McPhillips seethes at the rain outside of his South Pasadena home in this photo from April 19, 1967. Seems appropriate today.

Photo credit: John Malmin / Los Angeles Times