Time-lapse: the 86th Academy Awards in 60 seconds

From red carpet arrivals to standing ovations during the show, catch the nearly five-hour affair condensed into one minute. 

And for that, you can thank Bryan Chan and Robert Gauthier, the L.A. Times photographers who produced the video.

I’m going to be celebrating to the break of dawn. Trust me. Look me in the eyes and see that I will revel tonight. If they only knew what’s going to happen tonight.
If you haven’t made Oscar predictions yet, there’s still (a little) time. May we recommend our play-at-home ballot? If you want to look over someone’s shoulder, these are Times film reporter Glenn Whipp’s picks.

Film critic Kenneth Turan and columnist Robin Abcarian will offer live commentary during commercial breaks at latimes.com. We’ll give updates as they happen throughout the show in our live blog.

Photo: Workers cover Oscar statues with plastic in case of rain. Credit: Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times

If you haven’t made Oscar predictions yet, there’s still (a little) time. May we recommend our play-at-home ballot? If you want to look over someone’s shoulder, these are Times film reporter Glenn Whipp’s picks.

Film critic Kenneth Turan and columnist Robin Abcarian will offer live commentary during commercial breaks at latimes.com. We’ll give updates as they happen throughout the show in our live blog.

Photo: Workers cover Oscar statues with plastic in case of rain. Credit: Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times

Pharrell Williams on "Happy"

Pharrell Williams sat down to talk with L.A. Times entertainment writer Mikael Wood today about his Oscar-nominated original song “Happy,” his performance with Daft Punk and Stevie Wonder at the Grammys and more.

He also answered questions from viewers. Williams said he is a big fan of the homemade lip-sync versions of “Happy” that are a You Tube sensation: “They’ve been amazing. What better way to spread that sentiment than for people to take the song on and make it their own.”

'12 Years a Slave,' 'American Hustle' lead Academy Awards

In a much-anticipated ceremony held early this morning, the nominations for the 86th Academy Awards were declared, with some predictable honors, surprise acting recognition and, for what seems like the millionth time, a nomination for Meryl Streep.

The list of best picture nominees is as follows:

"12 Years a Slave"

"American Hustle"

"Captain Phillips"

"Dallas Buyers Club"

"Gravity"

"Her"

"Nebraska"

"Philomena"

"The Wolf of Wall Street"

For a look at the rest of this year’s nominations, head right here.

Photos: Fox Searchlight Films, Warner Bros. Pictures, Sony - Columbia Pictures

Photographer’s choice: Our best photos of 2013

The Los Angeles Times’ photo team has gone through their extensive archives and picked out their favorite shots from the entire past year - ranging from the glam and glitter of the Academy Awards, to the bleak shadows of California prisons.

Browse through the whole collection over at Framework.

Photos: Ricardo Dearathanha, Don Bartletti, Jay L. Clendenin, Rick Loomis, Gary Friedman, Wally Skalij / Los Angeles Times

'12 Years a Slave,' 'American Hustle' lead Golden Globe nominees

With seven nominations each, ‘12 Years a Slave’ and ‘American Hustle’ have jumped to the forefront of the Academy Awards conversation, and will likely be the ongoing favorites as Hollywood’s awards season kicks into gear.

But the Globes’ honors just aren’t limited to those two films - plenty of others, along with television shows like “Breaking Bad” and “House of Cards” earned nominees. Check out the full list here.

Photos: Sony-Columbia Pictures, Fox Searchlight, IFC, Kevin Winter / Getty Images, Disney

If there was an Academy Awards ceremony for best YouTube mashup, this would be the main attraction. After all of the Oscar hubbub, we’d be remiss not to show this mix of “Argo” and “Home Alone.”

(h/t bobbyfinger)

Argo still a no-go in Iran
"Argo" may have won acclaim from critics, audiences and now the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences - but many in Iran remain unimpressed with the film. Set during the turbulent post-revolution era in Iran, the Iranian government was initially provoked by the film for its portrayal of the country, but with time, more Iranians have been able to see the movie and react.

"I am secular, atheist and not pro-regime but I think the film 'Argo' has distorted history and insulted Iranians,” said Hossain, a cafe owner worried about business because of customers' lack of cash in a sanctions-battered economy. “For me, it wasn't even a good thriller.”

And further reaction from the ground in Iran:

"I did not enjoy seeing my fellow countrymen and women insulted," said Farzaneh Haji, an educated homemaker and fan of romantic movies who was 18 at the time of the revolution. "The men then were not all bearded and fanatical. To be anti-American was a fashionable idea among young people across the board. Even non-bearded and U.S.-educated men and women were against American imperialism."


Photo: Keith Bernstein / Warner Bros

Argo still a no-go in Iran

"Argo" may have won acclaim from critics, audiences and now the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences - but many in Iran remain unimpressed with the film. Set during the turbulent post-revolution era in Iran, the Iranian government was initially provoked by the film for its portrayal of the country, but with time, more Iranians have been able to see the movie and react.

"I am secular, atheist and not pro-regime but I think the film 'Argo' has distorted history and insulted Iranians,” said Hossain, a cafe owner worried about business because of customers' lack of cash in a sanctions-battered economy. “For me, it wasn't even a good thriller.”

And further reaction from the ground in Iran:

"I did not enjoy seeing my fellow countrymen and women insulted," said Farzaneh Haji, an educated homemaker and fan of romantic movies who was 18 at the time of the revolution. "The men then were not all bearded and fanatical. To be anti-American was a fashionable idea among young people across the board. Even non-bearded and U.S.-educated men and women were against American imperialism."

Photo: Keith Bernstein / Warner Bros

A joke too far: Last night, the Onion tweeted a tasteless joke at the expense of Quvenzhane Wallis, the youngest-ever Best Actress nominee, accusing her of being a less-than-agreeable person with a less-than-agreeable term.
Onion CEO Steve Hannah sent out an apology above, but the attempted joke comes amid rising criticism that the Oscars trumpeted sexism during the ceremony, with a focus paid largely on host Seth MacFarlane’s quips.Photo: The Onion, h/t to kateoplis

A joke too far: Last night, the Onion tweeted a tasteless joke at the expense of Quvenzhane Wallis, the youngest-ever Best Actress nominee, accusing her of being a less-than-agreeable person with a less-than-agreeable term.

Onion CEO Steve Hannah sent out an apology above, but the attempted joke comes amid rising criticism that the Oscars trumpeted sexism during the ceremony, with a focus paid largely on host Seth MacFarlane’s quips.

Photo: The Onion, h/t to kateoplis

"Argo, "Life of Pi" and Jennifer Lawrence: The Oscars have come to a close, the after-parties dying down and the realization of victory (and defeat) settling in. What did we learn?

"Argo" could win Best Picture without a Best Director nomination (the first to do so since “Driving Miss Daisy).

Jennifer Lawrence can do wrong. Stumbling up the stairs to receive her Best Actress award, Lawrence shrugged off help and brought herself back together.

"Life of Pi" is your new Oscar champ - at least if total awards count. Bouyed by a bevy of techincal awards and director Ang Lee’s victory, the film won four awards, topping “Argo” and “Les Misérables,” at three apiece.

A song titled “We Saw Your Boobs” is a juvenile cheap shot - particularly on the grand stage of the Oscars.

At the end of the day, how would you rate the Oscars - a thumbs up or a thumbs down?

Photos: Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP

The Oscars have nearly begun!

We have you covered, from the red carpet arrivals, an early preview of the night’s ceremonies and predictions from movie expert Glenn Whipp.

So keep tabs on our all-encompassing coverage, and most importantly, kick back and enjoy the tribune to some of the past year’s best films!

Photos: Joe Klamar / AFP / Getty Images, Jason Merritt / Getty Images, Frederic J. Brown / AFP/Getty Images

Oscars 2013: It’s not too late to fill out our Academy Award ballot, with just a few hours left until the 85th Academy Awards. Head over to our play-at-home ballot, save your picks, print it out and see how correct your predictions turn out to be!

Oscars 2013: It’s not too late to fill out our Academy Award ballot, with just a few hours left until the 85th Academy Awards. Head over to our play-at-home ballot, save your picks, print it out and see how correct your predictions turn out to be!

From the Archives (March 26, 1958): From left, John Wayne, Maurice Chevalier and Anthony Quinn share a laugh with producer Jerry Wald at rehearsals for the Academy Awards.
Click here for more vintage Academy Award photos 
Photo: Los Angeles Times

From the Archives (March 26, 1958): From left, John Wayne, Maurice Chevalier and Anthony Quinn share a laugh with producer Jerry Wald at rehearsals for the Academy Awards.

Click here for more vintage Academy Award photos 

Photo: Los Angeles Times

Forget the films, what about the food? Master chef Wolfgang Puck will once again take up kitchen duty for the Academy Awards this year, taking responsibility for the post-Oscars Governors Ball. If serving a multi-course meal to 1,600 guests doesn’t sound like a tough assignment, consider this:

The kitchen staff will have to wrap 2,750 dates in bacon, boil 6,000 chestnut tortellini, de-vein 7,500 shrimp and shuck 1,300 farmed oysters. And that’s just for a handful of the nearly four dozen separate dishes that Puck’s chefs will hand off to the waiters.

Read more on the labor of love for Puck and his staff, or just spend your time staring at food like we ended up doing.

Photos: Bethany Mollenkof / Los Angeles Times