Bernie Tiede, a former assistant funeral director from east Texas convicted in 1999 of killing octogenarian millionaire Marjorie Nugent, has been released from prison. A judge recommended that Tiede’s sentence be reduced to time served and that he be released on $10,000 bond pending appellate court approval. 
Among the conditions of Tiede’s release: He will be living in an apartment owned by Richard Linklater, who directed the 2011 film “Bernie,” which starred Jack Black as Tiede, Shirley MacLaine as Nugent and Matthew McConaughey as Dist. Atty. Danny Buck Davidson. The real Davidson supported Tiede’s release.
Reporter Matt Pearce explains how Tiede came to be released — and it’s quite a story — in the L.A. Times today.
Photo: Tiede smiles at the courthouse in Panola County, Texas, after his release is granted. Credit: LM Otero / Associated Press

Bernie Tiede, a former assistant funeral director from east Texas convicted in 1999 of killing octogenarian millionaire Marjorie Nugent, has been released from prison. A judge recommended that Tiede’s sentence be reduced to time served and that he be released on $10,000 bond pending appellate court approval. 

Among the conditions of Tiede’s release: He will be living in an apartment owned by Richard Linklater, who directed the 2011 film “Bernie,” which starred Jack Black as Tiede, Shirley MacLaine as Nugent and Matthew McConaughey as Dist. Atty. Danny Buck Davidson. The real Davidson supported Tiede’s release.

Reporter Matt Pearce explains how Tiede came to be released — and it’s quite a story — in the L.A. Times today.

Photo: Tiede smiles at the courthouse in Panola County, Texas, after his release is granted. Credit: LM Otero / Associated Press

Time-lapse: the 86th Academy Awards in 60 seconds

From red carpet arrivals to standing ovations during the show, catch the nearly five-hour affair condensed into one minute. 

And for that, you can thank Bryan Chan and Robert Gauthier, the L.A. Times photographers who produced the video.

I’m going to be celebrating to the break of dawn. Trust me. Look me in the eyes and see that I will revel tonight. If they only knew what’s going to happen tonight.
If you haven’t made Oscar predictions yet, there’s still (a little) time. May we recommend our play-at-home ballot? If you want to look over someone’s shoulder, these are Times film reporter Glenn Whipp’s picks.

Film critic Kenneth Turan and columnist Robin Abcarian will offer live commentary during commercial breaks at latimes.com. We’ll give updates as they happen throughout the show in our live blog.

Photo: Workers cover Oscar statues with plastic in case of rain. Credit: Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times

If you haven’t made Oscar predictions yet, there’s still (a little) time. May we recommend our play-at-home ballot? If you want to look over someone’s shoulder, these are Times film reporter Glenn Whipp’s picks.

Film critic Kenneth Turan and columnist Robin Abcarian will offer live commentary during commercial breaks at latimes.com. We’ll give updates as they happen throughout the show in our live blog.

Photo: Workers cover Oscar statues with plastic in case of rain. Credit: Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times

Shirley Temple Black has died at age 85.

The beloved child star of films like “Bright Eyes,” “Curly Top” and “Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm,” she was Hollywood’s reigning box-office champion from 1935 to 1938.

After she retired from acting, she went on to a career in diplomacy, with posts that included ambassadorships to Ghana and Czechoslovakia.

She died at her home in Northern California.
Photo: Temple with Eddie Cantor during a celebration of President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s birthday in 1937. Credit: UCLA Library / Los Angeles Times

Shirley Temple Black has died at age 85.

The beloved child star of films like “Bright Eyes,” “Curly Top” and “Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm,” she was Hollywood’s reigning box-office champion from 1935 to 1938.

After she retired from acting, she went on to a career in diplomacy, with posts that included ambassadorships to Ghana and Czechoslovakia.

She died at her home in Northern California.

Photo: Temple with Eddie Cantor during a celebration of President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s birthday in 1937. Credit: UCLA Library / Los Angeles Times

Pharrell Williams on "Happy"

Pharrell Williams sat down to talk with L.A. Times entertainment writer Mikael Wood today about his Oscar-nominated original song “Happy,” his performance with Daft Punk and Stevie Wonder at the Grammys and more.

He also answered questions from viewers. Williams said he is a big fan of the homemade lip-sync versions of “Happy” that are a You Tube sensation: “They’ve been amazing. What better way to spread that sentiment than for people to take the song on and make it their own.”

Leonardo DiCaprio though the years

A teen heartthrob who became one of the most accomplished actors of his generation, DiCaprio’s life has been thoroughly documented on film and in photos - above is just a sampling of Times photographers’ experiences with the star.

Photos: Kirk McCoy, Wally Skalij, Genaro Molina, Jay L. Clendenin / Los Angeles Times

He gave performances of sacred and terrifying intensity. Phil burned so brightly and with such unrelenting love — it made him one of the great theater performers of his or any generation.
latimespast:

"Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb” was released 50 years ago this week. The film is regarded as a cinematic masterpiece today (AFI ranked it No. 39 in its’ 10th anniversary Top 100 in 2007), but in February 1964, Times’ film editor Philip K. Scheuer didn’t find much to like. I’m partial to the deadpan of the subheadline: "Kubrick’s ‘Satire’ Tells All About End of World, Ha Ha." But this is a great line too:

… a publicist at Columbia, which is distributing the picture, assured me it would be my “cup of tea.” After suffering through two screenings of “Dr. Strangelove,” I would sooner drink hemlock.

Scheuer issues no spoiler alerts while giving away the ending and laments that “[a]ll members of our armed forces are pictured as either utterly unscrupulous or just plain stupid.”
And then he makes a point that is rather jarring to a reader in today’s era of the antihero. 

Is all this necessary? I submit that, as with “[It’s a Mad, Mad, Mad,] Mad World,” villains are not funny per se — especially when there are no good guys around to offset them.

Scheuer doesn’t spare the actors either.

Peter Sellers plays three parts, all in widely disparate make-up: the President, an RAF exchange officer and Dr. Strangelove, a Nazi fanatic employed as our top nuclear scientist. His bumbling Briton comes through; the others are, with all due respect to his talent for mimicry, simply preposterous. George C. Scott (I have never seen him give a bad performance till now) makes the staff chairman — Gen. Buck Turgidson — a mugging, stomach-scratching, gum-chewing vulgarian.

That’s Peter Sellers above, later in 1964. He’d had a heart attack and was photographed leaving the hospital with his wife.
— Matt Ballinger
Original published caption, May 8, 1964: GOING HOME — British comedian Peter Sellers, 38, stricken with a heart attack April 6 that almost cost him his life, gets a hug from his Swedish actress wife, Britt Eklund, 21, as he leaves Cedars of Lebanon Hospital on an ambulance litter Thursday. Credit: Los Angeles Times

latimespast:

"Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb” was released 50 years ago this week. The film is regarded as a cinematic masterpiece today (AFI ranked it No. 39 in its’ 10th anniversary Top 100 in 2007), but in February 1964, Times’ film editor Philip K. Scheuer didn’t find much to like. I’m partial to the deadpan of the subheadline: "Kubrick’s ‘Satire’ Tells All About End of World, Ha Ha." But this is a great line too:

… a publicist at Columbia, which is distributing the picture, assured me it would be my “cup of tea.” After suffering through two screenings of “Dr. Strangelove,” I would sooner drink hemlock.

Scheuer issues no spoiler alerts while giving away the ending and laments that “[a]ll members of our armed forces are pictured as either utterly unscrupulous or just plain stupid.”

And then he makes a point that is rather jarring to a reader in today’s era of the antihero. 

Is all this necessary? I submit that, as with “[It’s a Mad, Mad, Mad,] Mad World,” villains are not funny per se — especially when there are no good guys around to offset them.

Scheuer doesn’t spare the actors either.

Peter Sellers plays three parts, all in widely disparate make-up: the President, an RAF exchange officer and Dr. Strangelove, a Nazi fanatic employed as our top nuclear scientist. His bumbling Briton comes through; the others are, with all due respect to his talent for mimicry, simply preposterous. George C. Scott (I have never seen him give a bad performance till now) makes the staff chairman — Gen. Buck Turgidson — a mugging, stomach-scratching, gum-chewing vulgarian.

That’s Peter Sellers above, later in 1964. He’d had a heart attack and was photographed leaving the hospital with his wife.

Matt Ballinger

Original published caption, May 8, 1964: GOING HOME — British comedian Peter Sellers, 38, stricken with a heart attack April 6 that almost cost him his life, gets a hug from his Swedish actress wife, Britt Eklund, 21, as he leaves Cedars of Lebanon Hospital on an ambulance litter Thursday. Credit: Los Angeles Times

test reblogged from latimespast

'12 Years a Slave,' 'American Hustle' lead Academy Awards

In a much-anticipated ceremony held early this morning, the nominations for the 86th Academy Awards were declared, with some predictable honors, surprise acting recognition and, for what seems like the millionth time, a nomination for Meryl Streep.

The list of best picture nominees is as follows:

"12 Years a Slave"

"American Hustle"

"Captain Phillips"

"Dallas Buyers Club"

"Gravity"

"Her"

"Nebraska"

"Philomena"

"The Wolf of Wall Street"

For a look at the rest of this year’s nominations, head right here.

Photos: Fox Searchlight Films, Warner Bros. Pictures, Sony - Columbia Pictures

"American Hustle," "12 Years a Slave" top the Golden Globes

It was a stellar night for the Globes, with “12 Years a Slave” taking the top drama award, “American Hustle” being honored for its acting and a much-deserved send-off for “Breaking Bad.”

With the Globes being the Globes, there were plenty of bizarre moments (Jacqueline Bisset, we’re looking your way) to accompany the plentiful booze.

And of course, photobombs:

Read more on last night’s ceremony right here.

Photos: Wally Skalij, Lawrence K. Ho / Los Angeles Times, E!

2014’s stars in the making

With the new year just beginning, we thought you may want to get an early jump on some of the filmmakers, performers and creators who could be grabbing headlines later this year.

Gia Coppola’s continuation of her family’s Hollywood legacy, Zara McFarlane’s reaffirmation of jazz’s vitality and the husband-and-wife team pushing the boundaries of what counts as a video game are just a glimpse of who may make it big this year.

And yes, while “Welcome to Night Vale,” is no stranger to Tumblr, we wouldn’t be surprised if the podcast’s creative team sees even greater success in months to come.

So want to see who else made the list, or think we may have left someone off? Head over to our full listing right here.

Photos: Brownswood Recordings, Rick Madonik / Toronto Star via Getty Images, Anton Nickel, Media Greenhouse

It may not be factual, but it’s truthful.
starwars:

Artoo is pleased to announce the launch of our official Tumblr! We promise there won’t be any cat videos… except maybe a nexu or two.   

Not so long ago, in a Tumblr far, far away…

starwars:

Artoo is pleased to announce the launch of our official Tumblr! We promise there won’t be any cat videos… except maybe a nexu or two.   

Not so long ago, in a Tumblr far, far away…

test reblogged from starwars

Mourning two titans of the classic silver screen

The film community lost two of its most iconic actors over the weekend, with the passing of Peter O’Toole, who died Saturday at age 81, and Joan Fontaine, who died Sunday at age 96.

Both were renowned for their talent: Fontaine was honored with an Academy Award for best actress for her brilliant role in 1941’s “Suspicion,” and was nominated the previous year of “Rebecca,” and O’Toole was nominated for a stunning eight Academy Awards without a single victory.

"Always the bridesmaid, never a bride," he quipped upon receiving an honorary Oscar in 2003.

Read more on their lasting legacies over at Movies Now.

Photos: Associated Press, Martha Hartnett / Los Angeles Times, RKO Radio