Georgia inmate Marcus Wellons, convicted of the 1989 rape and murder of a 15-year-old girl, has become the first U.S. prisoner to be executed since the botched Oklahoma lethal injection in April.
A short time later, Missouri executed John Winfield, who was convicted of shooting three women, killing two of them, in 1996.
Photos: Marcus Wellons, left, and John Winfield.

Georgia inmate Marcus Wellons, convicted of the 1989 rape and murder of a 15-year-old girl, has become the first U.S. prisoner to be executed since the botched Oklahoma lethal injection in April.

A short time later, Missouri executed John Winfield, who was convicted of shooting three women, killing two of them, in 1996.

Photos: Marcus Wellons, left, and John Winfield.

Old Polaroid yields eerie development — a long-dead uncle: A random garage sale purchase surprises a 13-year-old with a picture of a relative he had never known.
Wow.
Photo credit: Matt Pearce / For The Times

Old Polaroid yields eerie development — a long-dead uncle: A random garage sale purchase surprises a 13-year-old with a picture of a relative he had never known.

Wow.

Photo credit: Matt Pearce / For The Times

Post-tornado tourism map reopens wounds:  The Joplin Convention & Visitors Bureau in Missouri created a map highlighting areas hit hard by a tornado last year, and it has drawn the anger of residents.

"This is my apartment, this is my car … my heart aches that someone used it without thought of my feelings," Nancy Cornish posted on Jan. 16 in response to one of the pictures on the map.
"The #5 spot is directly over my apartment. It still makes me feel physically ill when I have to drive past it. It was the first apartment I had all on my own. How dare they send tourists to my home that was stolen from me? This is sickening," Carolyn J. Lamson wrote Jan. 18.

Photo:   An inspirational sign at an intersection in a Joplin, Mo., neighborhood that was destroyed in May by a tornado. Credit: Charlie Riedel / Associated Press

Post-tornado tourism map reopens wounds: The Joplin Convention & Visitors Bureau in Missouri created a map highlighting areas hit hard by a tornado last year, and it has drawn the anger of residents.

"This is my apartment, this is my car … my heart aches that someone used it without thought of my feelings," Nancy Cornish posted on Jan. 16 in response to one of the pictures on the map.

"The #5 spot is directly over my apartment. It still makes me feel physically ill when I have to drive past it. It was the first apartment I had all on my own. How dare they send tourists to my home that was stolen from me? This is sickening," Carolyn J. Lamson wrote Jan. 18.

Photo: An inspirational sign at an intersection in a Joplin, Mo., neighborhood that was destroyed in May by a tornado. Credit: Charlie Riedel / Associated Press

Praying perpetually to save society: At the International House of Prayer in Kansas City, Mo., the worshiping never stops. The 24-hour effort is part of a movement to save business, media and government from evil.
Photo:   Worshipers raise their hands in the prayer room at the International House of Prayer. There has been around-the-clock worship at the evangelical church in Kansas City, Mo., every day since September 1999. Credit: Mitchell Landsberg / Los Angeles Times 

Praying perpetually to save society: At the International House of Prayer in Kansas City, Mo., the worshiping never stops. The 24-hour effort is part of a movement to save business, media and government from evil.

Photo: Worshipers raise their hands in the prayer room at the International House of Prayer. There has been around-the-clock worship at the evangelical church in Kansas City, Mo., every day since September 1999. Credit: Mitchell Landsberg / Los Angeles Times 

In shattered Joplin, kids head back to class: Many schools were destroyed in the May tornado that killed 160 people. Some students and teachers lost everything. But it’s time to return to routine. 

"I’m sad that we don’t actually have a real high school, but it’s nice to have a new facility," said Aubrey Bokay, 16, an incoming junior at Joplin High School, as she toured the new campus.
She paused before adding, softly, a remembrance for Lantz Hare, a classmate killed in the storm. “It’s going to be weird coming to high school and not see Lantz every day, riding his skateboard outside.”

Photo:  Joplin, Mo., public school teachers walk into Missouri Southern State University prior to the start of the school year. Classes begin Wednesday. Credit: T. Rob Brown / Joplin Globe

In shattered Joplin, kids head back to class: Many schools were destroyed in the May tornado that killed 160 people. Some students and teachers lost everything. But it’s time to return to routine.

"I’m sad that we don’t actually have a real high school, but it’s nice to have a new facility," said Aubrey Bokay, 16, an incoming junior at Joplin High School, as she toured the new campus.

She paused before adding, softly, a remembrance for Lantz Hare, a classmate killed in the storm. “It’s going to be weird coming to high school and not see Lantz every day, riding his skateboard outside.”

Photo: Joplin, Mo., public school teachers walk into Missouri Southern State University prior to the start of the school year. Classes begin Wednesday. Credit: T. Rob Brown / Joplin Globe

Volunteer Abi Almandinger has been collecting tornado-scattered photos blown for miles by the Joplin, Mo., tornado and posting them on a Facebook page to help their owners find them.
Photo: Abi Almandinger, 38, is collecting personal photos and papers widely scattered during the tornado in Joplin, Mo., and posting them on Facebook to help their owners recover them. Credit: Matt Pearce / For The Times

Volunteer Abi Almandinger has been collecting tornado-scattered photos blown for miles by the Joplin, Mo., tornado and posting them on a Facebook page to help their owners find them.

Photo: Abi Almandinger, 38, is collecting personal photos and papers widely scattered during the tornado in Joplin, Mo., and posting them on Facebook to help their owners recover them. Credit: Matt Pearce / For The Times

Satellite images of Joplin, Mo., before and after the tornado.

Satellite images of Joplin, Mo., before and after the tornado.

One of a number of homes in Joplin, Mo., lies in ruins after the devastating tornado. View more photos on Framework.
Photo credit: Larry W. Smith / EPA

One of a number of homes in Joplin, Mo., lies in ruins after the devastating tornado. View more photos on Framework.

Photo credit: Larry W. Smith / EPA