He might have known what happened, but honestly, I don’t think he did it.
Generations of UCLA students were unaware of a slice of of the school’s history that connected it to the activism of the Vietnam War era and the nation’s civil rights struggle, until a mural created in the 1970s and hidden in the 1990s was recently revealed.
Photo: Bob Chamberlin, Los Angeles Times

Generations of UCLA students were unaware of a slice of of the school’s history that connected it to the activism of the Vietnam War era and the nation’s civil rights struggle, until a mural created in the 1970s and hidden in the 1990s was recently revealed.

Photo: Bob Chamberlin, Los Angeles Times

I think it gives joy to the family to see us perform like that. And it makes me feel better toward myself. I feel more positive when I’m dressed up like that.
Former Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer has won a frenetic bidding war for ownership of the L.A. Clippers. His $2-billion offer sets a record price for an NBA team. 
Photo: Kay Nietfeld / EPA

Former Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer has won a frenetic bidding war for ownership of the L.A. Clippers. His $2-billion offer sets a record price for an NBA team. 

Photo: Kay Nietfeld / EPA

Hungry? If you want to eat some of the best food in L.A., we’re here to help. Times restaurant critic Jonathan Gold has released his list of the 101 best restaurants in the L.A. area. You won’t be able to access the full list if you’re not a subscriber, but you can peek at the top 20 here.

Photos, from top: Bethany Mollenkof / Los Angeles Times, Mark Boster / Los Angeles Times, Ricardo DeAratanha / Los Angeles Times, Gina Ferazzi / Los Angeles Times

They grow up in poverty, but we don’t want them to live in poverty. They’ve been taught to be seen but not heard. And I’ve been taught if you’re not heard, then you’re not seen.
A preliminary map released by the California Geological Survey shows the Hollywood fault running under hundreds of buildings, including the Capitol Records building and luxury hotels on the Sunset Strip. Take a tour of the fault line here.

A preliminary map released by the California Geological Survey shows the Hollywood fault running under hundreds of buildings, including the Capitol Records building and luxury hotels on the Sunset Strip. Take a tour of the fault line here.

We’re inviting Southern Californians to describe their neighborhoods using the form you see above. Choose your neighborhood and fill out the form here.

We’re inviting Southern Californians to describe their neighborhoods using the form you see above. Choose your neighborhood and fill out the form here.

When you get this many Lakers to stand up for the Clippers, you know something big is happening in L.A.
About 40% of L.A. County food trucks and carts haven’t been inspected in the field by health officials since letter grades were introduced three years ago. And most of the remaining 60% have only been inspected half as often as official guidelines specify. 
"How do I know that? Because Angelo Bellomo, director of environmental health for the county Department of Public Health, told me so. He oversees inspections of all eateries, including mobile ones," consumer columnist David Lazarus writes.
Nearly all area food trucks do get a separate annual certification inspection, but it happens at the truck’s storage site, not while it’s out serving food. The toughest part of inspecting in the field, Bellomo told Lazarus, is actually finding the trucks.
Photo: Lawrence K. Ho / Los Angeles Times

About 40% of L.A. County food trucks and carts haven’t been inspected in the field by health officials since letter grades were introduced three years ago. And most of the remaining 60% have only been inspected half as often as official guidelines specify. 

"How do I know that? Because Angelo Bellomo, director of environmental health for the county Department of Public Health, told me so. He oversees inspections of all eateries, including mobile ones," consumer columnist David Lazarus writes.

Nearly all area food trucks do get a separate annual certification inspection, but it happens at the truck’s storage site, not while it’s out serving food. The toughest part of inspecting in the field, Bellomo told Lazarus, is actually finding the trucks.

Photo: Lawrence K. Ho / Los Angeles Times

latimespast:

Here’s a look at downtown Culver City, circa 1920.
Credit: Los Angeles Times / UCLA Library

At the time this photo was taken, Culver City was less than a decade old. This 1913 L.A. Times article on what was then only “as yet a ‘city on paper’” described it as “a promising urban center half way between downtown Los Angeles and the Venice oceanfront.”
Nathan Masters has more on Culver City’s history, including its self-proclaimed stint as “the Heart of Screenland,” at KCET.

latimespast:

Here’s a look at downtown Culver City, circa 1920.

Credit: Los Angeles Times / UCLA Library

At the time this photo was taken, Culver City was less than a decade old. This 1913 L.A. Times article on what was then only “as yet a ‘city on paper’” described it as “a promising urban center half way between downtown Los Angeles and the Venice oceanfront.”

Nathan Masters has more on Culver City’s history, including its self-proclaimed stint as “the Heart of Screenland,” at KCET.

test reblogged from latimespast

Friday’s magnitude 5.1 earthquake centered in La Habra was felt by an estimated 17 million people, and 16,000 of them used the U.S. Geological Survey’s Did You Feel It? online reporting system to provide seismologists with data on their experiences.

The Did You Feel It? system was created in 1999; before that, the USGS sent snail-mail questionnaires to people who lived in ZIP codes that had been affected by earthquakes. People filled out and returned the questionnaires, and the information they gave had to be compiled in a process that took months. Thanks, Internet: Now scientists have quick access to usable, sortable data from the public that helps establish the intensity of an earthquake and how far from its epicenter it was felt.

Here’s our full coverage of the earthquake and its aftershocks.

Photo: Cesar Zamora, night manager at the 99 Cents Only store on Imperial Highway, looks over aisles of fallen goods on March 28. Credit: Robert Gauthier / Los Angeles Times. More photos.

Friday’s magnitude 5.1 earthquake centered in La Habra was felt by an estimated 17 million people, and 16,000 of them used the U.S. Geological Survey’s Did You Feel It? online reporting system to provide seismologists with data on their experiences.

The Did You Feel It? system was created in 1999; before that, the USGS sent snail-mail questionnaires to people who lived in ZIP codes that had been affected by earthquakes. People filled out and returned the questionnaires, and the information they gave had to be compiled in a process that took months. Thanks, Internet: Now scientists have quick access to usable, sortable data from the public that helps establish the intensity of an earthquake and how far from its epicenter it was felt.

Here’s our full coverage of the earthquake and its aftershocks.

Photo: Cesar Zamora, night manager at the 99 Cents Only store on Imperial Highway, looks over aisles of fallen goods on March 28. Credit: Robert Gauthier / Los Angeles Times. More photos.

Since 1973, more than 100 earthquakes with a magnitude of 4 or higher have struck in the greater Los Angeles area. Our interactive map allows you to see the location, magnitude and date of each quake.

Friday’s 5.1 earthquake was a potent reminder of a fault that is less known to most Californians than the San Andreas, but that seismologists believe can produce a catastrophic disaster. That fault, the Puente Hills fault, is so dangerous because of its location, reporter Rong-Gong Lin II explains. Here’s our full coverage of Southern California’s recent earthquakes and an earthquake preparedness guide.

Map data: Southern California Earthquake Center

Since 1973, more than 100 earthquakes with a magnitude of 4 or higher have struck in the greater Los Angeles area. Our interactive map allows you to see the location, magnitude and date of each quake.

Friday’s 5.1 earthquake was a potent reminder of a fault that is less known to most Californians than the San Andreas, but that seismologists believe can produce a catastrophic disaster. That fault, the Puente Hills fault, is so dangerous because of its location, reporter Rong-Gong Lin II explains. Here’s our full coverage of Southern California’s recent earthquakes and an earthquake preparedness guide.

Map data: Southern California Earthquake Center

The population of L.A. County has passed 10 million, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. It’s the most populous county in the U.S., with nearly twice as many residents as the runner-up, Illinois’ Cook County.

Photo: The CicLAvia event in L.A. in 2013. Credit: Genaro Molina / Los Angeles Times

The population of L.A. County has passed 10 million, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. It’s the most populous county in the U.S., with nearly twice as many residents as the runner-up, Illinois’ Cook County.

Photo: The CicLAvia event in L.A. in 2013. Credit: Genaro Molina / Los Angeles Times

These are wonderful radio ads for the L.A. Times from the 1960s and ’70s. “Every day, every day, the world’s at your dooooooor!”

latimespast:

"A newspaper of uncommon excellence." That’s how Gordon Phillips, known as “The Voice of The Times,” describes the paper in a 1970s radio ad introducing the San Diego edition of the Los Angeles Times.

Phillips’ incredible voice and knack for a catchy phrase is in evidence in the four recordings above, brought to you by Times reporter Bob Pool and producer and developer Armand Emamdjomeh. 

The first recording appears to be from 1962 — that’s when the Mirror folded into The Times. (“The best of the Mirror is now in The Times.”)

In the next spot, Phillips describes former Hong Kong bureau chief Ed Meagher’s helicopter journey from Vietnam to Laos. A search of The Times’ archive shows Meagher was writing extensively about Laos from 1962 to 1965.

The next ad is likely from 1972 1978, when The Times’ San Diego edition launched.

And based on the music, I’m going out on a limb that the final recording was made in the ’70s as well.

Sadly, Phillips was killed in an accident in New York City in 1984 while on Times business. Vance Stickell, then the paper’s executive vice president of marketing, praised his professionalism but was more interested in his personality. “Our biggest loss, however, will be the humor and personal relationship of a dear friend,” Stickell said.

(That’s Phillips above. The image is from a screengrab from the April 25, 1984, Times story about his death.)

Matt Ballinger

So remember: “Every day, in every day, we’re bringing you mooooore!”

test reblogged from latimespast