About 40% of L.A. County food trucks and carts haven’t been inspected in the field by health officials since letter grades were introduced three years ago. And most of the remaining 60% have only been inspected half as often as official guidelines specify. 
"How do I know that? Because Angelo Bellomo, director of environmental health for the county Department of Public Health, told me so. He oversees inspections of all eateries, including mobile ones," consumer columnist David Lazarus writes.
Nearly all area food trucks do get a separate annual certification inspection, but it happens at the truck’s storage site, not while it’s out serving food. The toughest part of inspecting in the field, Bellomo told Lazarus, is actually finding the trucks.
Photo: Lawrence K. Ho / Los Angeles Times

About 40% of L.A. County food trucks and carts haven’t been inspected in the field by health officials since letter grades were introduced three years ago. And most of the remaining 60% have only been inspected half as often as official guidelines specify. 

"How do I know that? Because Angelo Bellomo, director of environmental health for the county Department of Public Health, told me so. He oversees inspections of all eateries, including mobile ones," consumer columnist David Lazarus writes.

Nearly all area food trucks do get a separate annual certification inspection, but it happens at the truck’s storage site, not while it’s out serving food. The toughest part of inspecting in the field, Bellomo told Lazarus, is actually finding the trucks.

Photo: Lawrence K. Ho / Los Angeles Times

latimespast:

Here’s a look at downtown Culver City, circa 1920.
Credit: Los Angeles Times / UCLA Library

At the time this photo was taken, Culver City was less than a decade old. This 1913 L.A. Times article on what was then only “as yet a ‘city on paper’” described it as “a promising urban center half way between downtown Los Angeles and the Venice oceanfront.”
Nathan Masters has more on Culver City’s history, including its self-proclaimed stint as “the Heart of Screenland,” at KCET.

latimespast:

Here’s a look at downtown Culver City, circa 1920.

Credit: Los Angeles Times / UCLA Library

At the time this photo was taken, Culver City was less than a decade old. This 1913 L.A. Times article on what was then only “as yet a ‘city on paper’” described it as “a promising urban center half way between downtown Los Angeles and the Venice oceanfront.”

Nathan Masters has more on Culver City’s history, including its self-proclaimed stint as “the Heart of Screenland,” at KCET.

test reblogged from latimespast

Friday’s magnitude 5.1 earthquake centered in La Habra was felt by an estimated 17 million people, and 16,000 of them used the U.S. Geological Survey’s Did You Feel It? online reporting system to provide seismologists with data on their experiences.

The Did You Feel It? system was created in 1999; before that, the USGS sent snail-mail questionnaires to people who lived in ZIP codes that had been affected by earthquakes. People filled out and returned the questionnaires, and the information they gave had to be compiled in a process that took months. Thanks, Internet: Now scientists have quick access to usable, sortable data from the public that helps establish the intensity of an earthquake and how far from its epicenter it was felt.

Here’s our full coverage of the earthquake and its aftershocks.

Photo: Cesar Zamora, night manager at the 99 Cents Only store on Imperial Highway, looks over aisles of fallen goods on March 28. Credit: Robert Gauthier / Los Angeles Times. More photos.

Friday’s magnitude 5.1 earthquake centered in La Habra was felt by an estimated 17 million people, and 16,000 of them used the U.S. Geological Survey’s Did You Feel It? online reporting system to provide seismologists with data on their experiences.

The Did You Feel It? system was created in 1999; before that, the USGS sent snail-mail questionnaires to people who lived in ZIP codes that had been affected by earthquakes. People filled out and returned the questionnaires, and the information they gave had to be compiled in a process that took months. Thanks, Internet: Now scientists have quick access to usable, sortable data from the public that helps establish the intensity of an earthquake and how far from its epicenter it was felt.

Here’s our full coverage of the earthquake and its aftershocks.

Photo: Cesar Zamora, night manager at the 99 Cents Only store on Imperial Highway, looks over aisles of fallen goods on March 28. Credit: Robert Gauthier / Los Angeles Times. More photos.

Since 1973, more than 100 earthquakes with a magnitude of 4 or higher have struck in the greater Los Angeles area. Our interactive map allows you to see the location, magnitude and date of each quake.

Friday’s 5.1 earthquake was a potent reminder of a fault that is less known to most Californians than the San Andreas, but that seismologists believe can produce a catastrophic disaster. That fault, the Puente Hills fault, is so dangerous because of its location, reporter Rong-Gong Lin II explains. Here’s our full coverage of Southern California’s recent earthquakes and an earthquake preparedness guide.

Map data: Southern California Earthquake Center

Since 1973, more than 100 earthquakes with a magnitude of 4 or higher have struck in the greater Los Angeles area. Our interactive map allows you to see the location, magnitude and date of each quake.

Friday’s 5.1 earthquake was a potent reminder of a fault that is less known to most Californians than the San Andreas, but that seismologists believe can produce a catastrophic disaster. That fault, the Puente Hills fault, is so dangerous because of its location, reporter Rong-Gong Lin II explains. Here’s our full coverage of Southern California’s recent earthquakes and an earthquake preparedness guide.

Map data: Southern California Earthquake Center

The population of L.A. County has passed 10 million, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. It’s the most populous county in the U.S., with nearly twice as many residents as the runner-up, Illinois’ Cook County.

Photo: The CicLAvia event in L.A. in 2013. Credit: Genaro Molina / Los Angeles Times

The population of L.A. County has passed 10 million, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. It’s the most populous county in the U.S., with nearly twice as many residents as the runner-up, Illinois’ Cook County.

Photo: The CicLAvia event in L.A. in 2013. Credit: Genaro Molina / Los Angeles Times

These are wonderful radio ads for the L.A. Times from the 1960s and ’70s. “Every day, every day, the world’s at your dooooooor!”

latimespast:

"A newspaper of uncommon excellence." That’s how Gordon Phillips, known as “The Voice of The Times,” describes the paper in a 1970s radio ad introducing the San Diego edition of the Los Angeles Times.

Phillips’ incredible voice and knack for a catchy phrase is in evidence in the four recordings above, brought to you by Times reporter Bob Pool and producer and developer Armand Emamdjomeh. 

The first recording appears to be from 1962 — that’s when the Mirror folded into The Times. (“The best of the Mirror is now in The Times.”)

In the next spot, Phillips describes former Hong Kong bureau chief Ed Meagher’s helicopter journey from Vietnam to Laos. A search of The Times’ archive shows Meagher was writing extensively about Laos from 1962 to 1965.

The next ad is likely from 1972 1978, when The Times’ San Diego edition launched.

And based on the music, I’m going out on a limb that the final recording was made in the ’70s as well.

Sadly, Phillips was killed in an accident in New York City in 1984 while on Times business. Vance Stickell, then the paper’s executive vice president of marketing, praised his professionalism but was more interested in his personality. “Our biggest loss, however, will be the humor and personal relationship of a dear friend,” Stickell said.

(That’s Phillips above. The image is from a screengrab from the April 25, 1984, Times story about his death.)

Matt Ballinger

So remember: “Every day, in every day, we’re bringing you mooooore!”

test reblogged from latimespast

losangelespast:

A daredevil in golfing attire traipses along a steel beam high above the street during construction of the Los Angeles City Hall, 1927. The Hall of Justice and the old courthouse can be seen in the background.

losangelespast:

A daredevil in golfing attire traipses along a steel beam high above the street during construction of the Los Angeles City Hall, 1927. The Hall of Justice and the old courthouse can be seen in the background.

test reblogged from losangelespast

Gentrification forcing some L.A. gangs to commute to their turf

Los Angeles’ Echo Park, once a familiar stomping ground for the area’s gangs, has recently been hit with a wave of gentrification, with boutiques, coffee shops and rent increases displacing gang members.

Pushed out by this activity, many have been commuting to their turf only on the weekends, rapidly diminishing gang activity in the area. And now an injunction has been placed on Echo Park gangs, prohibiting them from congregating in a “safety zone” that envelops the neighborhood - even if they already live within its boundaries.

Officials praise it as a tool to make the neighborhood safer, but some residents say it places an unfair focus on minorities.

"The cops creep by and give me a look," said Salvador Aguirre, an Echo Park native who protested the injunction this summer.

"Being bald and Mexican American, we’re all looked at the same. We’re all the problems. I don’t want to be looked at twice."

Read reporter Marisa Gerber’s full story here.

Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times

Foggy Hill Street tunnels
A look at the Hill Street tunnels, seen from Temple Street in downtown L.A., circa 1954.
Photo: Howard Maxwell / Los Angeles Times

Foggy Hill Street tunnels

A look at the Hill Street tunnels, seen from Temple Street in downtown L.A., circa 1954.

Photo: Howard Maxwell / Los Angeles Times

How many snakes can you fit into one house?
Maybe one if you’re a little squeamish about them? A few dozen if you don’t particularly care about seeing a bunch peek out from your laundry hamper or pantry?Now try and imagine having as many as 400 snakes in your house. That’s just what police found at a home in Santa Ana earlier today while serving a police warrant. Officers reportedly could smell the stench of the snakes, many of which were in terrible condition, if not dead, from up to 300 feet away.
Read the full, sad story over at L.A. Now.
Photo: Irfan Khan / Los Angeles Times

How many snakes can you fit into one house?

Maybe one if you’re a little squeamish about them? A few dozen if you don’t particularly care about seeing a bunch peek out from your laundry hamper or pantry?

Now try and imagine having as many as 400 snakes in your house. That’s just what police found at a home in Santa Ana earlier today while serving a police warrant. Officers reportedly could smell the stench of the snakes, many of which were in terrible condition, if not dead, from up to 300 feet away.

Read the full, sad story over at L.A. Now.

Photo: Irfan Khan / Los Angeles Times

wired:

Look at all those subway stops! No, it’s not NYC. This is what San Francisco and L.A. could look like…

If you live in a city and take public transit, you’ve probably looked at the system map and thought to yourself, “I wish this thing went everywhere.”

You’re not alone. There’s a whole bunch of daydreamers just like you who’ve considered the additional subway lines, bus routes, and train tracks it would take to bring more people to more places. Some of them have even mapped these ideas out. The internet is full of these fantasy transit maps, where professional transit planners and dedicated amateurs alike imagine how public transit in our cities could look.

[MORE: 13 Fake Public Transit Systems We Wish Existed]

One day Los Angeles, one day…

test reblogged from wired

A tiny, retro run-in with the law
From a 1970 story we ran on some highly restrictive anti-motorbike measures that brought an 11-year-old boy at odds with the law:

Randy West, 11, took it like a man Wednesday – his first brush with the law and the news that his favorite minibike trails were off limits.
The sandy-haired youngster was one of the first to receive a warning citation from police as the result of a new ordinance which places virtually insurmountable restrictions on use of private property for motorcycle or minibike riding in the city.
“If it’s the law, you gotta obey it,” said Randy moments after receiving the warning citation for riding his minibike on a popular trail between Huntington Center and the San Diego Freeway.

Photo: Cliff Otto / Los Angeles Times

A tiny, retro run-in with the law

From a 1970 story we ran on some highly restrictive anti-motorbike measures that brought an 11-year-old boy at odds with the law:

Randy West, 11, took it like a man Wednesday – his first brush with the law and the news that his favorite minibike trails were off limits.

The sandy-haired youngster was one of the first to receive a warning citation from police as the result of a new ordinance which places virtually insurmountable restrictions on use of private property for motorcycle or minibike riding in the city.

“If it’s the law, you gotta obey it,” said Randy moments after receiving the warning citation for riding his minibike on a popular trail between Huntington Center and the San Diego Freeway.

Photo: Cliff Otto / Los Angeles Times

Santa Monica’s famous mosaic home

Aziz and Louise Farnam started their decoration habits humbly enough - putting a single periwinkle square up into the corner of a retaining wall in their Santa Monica home. But things quickly, and colorfully, escalated from there:

Theycollected pieces of cobalt blue, aqua, plum and yellows from pale to sunny. They broke or cut them with special nippers into irregular shapes and applied those to the wall, letting them radiate in no particular pattern from the original piece.

They finished that wall, then tiled the walkway to the front door.

From there, things escalated — to a traffic-stopping degree. Motorists routinely slam on their brakes to marvel at the eccentric artistry.

"Everyone knows my house," Louise said. "Just say ‘mosaic tile house in Santa Monica.’"

Read more in our latest Column One feature.

Photos: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

Los Angeles is built on top of a lost city of Lizard People
Or at least, that’s how the theory goes. G. Warren Shufelt, an earnest engineer believed early last century that L.A. had been constructed on the same grounds as an ancient Lizard People stronghold, as mapped out above.
From our 1934 story on the bizarre belief:

Busy Los Angeles, although little realizing it in the hustle and bustle of modern existence, stands above a lost city of catacombs filled with incalculable treasure and imperishable records of a race of humans further advanced intellectually and scientifically than even the highest type of present day peoples, in the belief of G. Warren Shufelt, geophysical mining engineer now engaged in an attempt to wrest from the lost city deep in the earth below Fort Moore Hill the secrets of the Lizard People of legendary fame in the medicine lodges of the American Indian.

Read more on the lizard people whose former homes may rest right below your very feet at L.A. Times Past.

Los Angeles is built on top of a lost city of Lizard People

Or at least, that’s how the theory goes. G. Warren Shufelt, an earnest engineer believed early last century that L.A. had been constructed on the same grounds as an ancient Lizard People stronghold, as mapped out above.

From our 1934 story on the bizarre belief:

Busy Los Angeles, although little realizing it in the hustle and bustle of modern existence, stands above a lost city of catacombs filled with incalculable treasure and imperishable records of a race of humans further advanced intellectually and scientifically than even the highest type of present day peoples, in the belief of G. Warren Shufelt, geophysical mining engineer now engaged in an attempt to wrest from the lost city deep in the earth below Fort Moore Hill the secrets of the Lizard People of legendary fame in the medicine lodges of the American Indian.

Read more on the lizard people whose former homes may rest right below your very feet at L.A. Times Past.

Building a hockey rink in Dodgers Stadium

Saturday, right in the middle of Dodgers stadium, the Los Angeles Kings and Anaheim Ducks will face off in the first NHL regular season game held outdoors west of the Rocky Mountains.

But beyond the technical feat of having an ice rink in the middle of a warm L.A. January, there’s an intangible joy to the project.

As Dan Craig, the man leading the icy project put it:

"The satisfaction for me will be when the guys skate out there. Nobody has to tell me.

I’ll know well ahead of them what they’re going to feel, and I’ll know from how I see them skate and how I see their eyes and the expression on their face. When you get guys from 19 to 39 just grinning from ear to ear and loving being out there, that’s what we do.”

Read columnist Helene Elliott’s full story right here.

Photos: Wally Skalij / Los Angeles Times, Nick Ut / Associated Press