"We’re in an age now where this kind of technology is expected. It gives us an opportunity to do better."
L.A. County sheriff’s deputies and other California law enforcement agencies are experimenting with body cameras as a way to provide greater accountability.
Photo: Jay L. Clendenin / Los Angeles Times

"We’re in an age now where this kind of technology is expected. It gives us an opportunity to do better."

L.A. County sheriff’s deputies and other California law enforcement agencies are experimenting with body cameras as a way to provide greater accountability.

Photo: Jay L. Clendenin / Los Angeles Times

latimespast:

Stay cool, Los Angeles — like the people above in a 1920s-era photo from the Los Angeles Municipal Plunge.
Wherever you go to cool off, you’re unlikely to encounter the swimsuits of the 1920s. The Times reported in July 1920 about a rule requiring women’s swimsuits to have skirts — and not gauzy or see-through skirts neither!
From an article headlined What Ho! Put Skirts on Bathers:

Oh, you film bathing beauties! Likewise, a what ho! or two for the Venice mermaids, also what to tell! This is to warn you that if you would a-bathing go at any of the municipal swimming pools you must leave your gay and abbreviated bathing suits at home, for the Playground Commission, with the Council’s connivance, has issued a Puritan pool edict.
In other words, if you, this is only for feminine ears, would swim anywhere within the purlieus of Los Angeles you must hide your charms with a skirt that isn’t diaphanous.
…
"Oh, yes," said Supt. Raitt of the Department of Playgrounds, yesterday, "we are turning back young women who would bathe in the city pools in suits that — ah, ahem — we, you know — suits that would be all right perhaps at Venice or Atlantic City but — well, we cannot permit them."

Read the rest of The Times’ story about the "Puritan pool edict."
— Matt Ballinger
Photo: Bathers at Los Angeles public swimming pool the Municipal Plunge, circa 1920. Credit: Los Angeles Times / UCLA Library

This SoCal heat wave is breaking records, but we haven’t heard about any new fashion edicts yet. 

latimespast:

Stay cool, Los Angeles — like the people above in a 1920s-era photo from the Los Angeles Municipal Plunge.

Wherever you go to cool off, you’re unlikely to encounter the swimsuits of the 1920s. The Times reported in July 1920 about a rule requiring women’s swimsuits to have skirts — and not gauzy or see-through skirts neither!

From an article headlined What Ho! Put Skirts on Bathers:

Oh, you film bathing beauties! Likewise, a what ho! or two for the Venice mermaids, also what to tell! This is to warn you that if you would a-bathing go at any of the municipal swimming pools you must leave your gay and abbreviated bathing suits at home, for the Playground Commission, with the Council’s connivance, has issued a Puritan pool edict.

In other words, if you, this is only for feminine ears, would swim anywhere within the purlieus of Los Angeles you must hide your charms with a skirt that isn’t diaphanous.

"Oh, yes," said Supt. Raitt of the Department of Playgrounds, yesterday, "we are turning back young women who would bathe in the city pools in suits that — ah, ahem — we, you know — suits that would be all right perhaps at Venice or Atlantic City but — well, we cannot permit them."

Read the rest of The Times’ story about the "Puritan pool edict."

Matt Ballinger

Photo: Bathers at Los Angeles public swimming pool the Municipal Plunge, circa 1920. Credit: Los Angeles Times / UCLA Library

This SoCal heat wave is breaking records, but we haven’t heard about any new fashion edicts yet. 

test reblogged from latimespast

Repurposed parking meters in Pasadena are collecting change for nonprofits that serve the homeless. Pasadena is the first city in L.A. County to try the donation meters, which are supposed to raise awareness for the city’s homeless programs.
Photo: Ricardo DeAratanha / Los Angeles Times

Repurposed parking meters in Pasadena are collecting change for nonprofits that serve the homeless. Pasadena is the first city in L.A. County to try the donation meters, which are supposed to raise awareness for the city’s homeless programs.

Photo: Ricardo DeAratanha / Los Angeles Times

Thanks for keeping me and my friends alive.
We live in L.A.; by definition, we’re already cool. Don’t try so hard, dude.
Since Obamacare, emergency room visits are down at L.A. County public hospitals, a Times analysis finds.

Since Obamacare, emergency room visits are down at L.A. County public hospitals, a Times analysis finds.

Steve Ballmer is officially the new owner of the Clippers, NBA says.

The transaction ends a fractious period of nearly four months in which embattled owner Donald Sterling fought to retain control of the team he had presided over for three decades. A judge affirmed the right of Shelly Sterling, Donald’s estranged wife, to wrest control of the team from her husband and sell it to Ballmer.

L.A.’s Wilshire Grand skyscraper will one day be the tallest building west of Chicago. But before it could get off the ground, someone had to make sure that ground was solid. Here’s the story of how the project was born.

L.A.’s Wilshire Grand skyscraper will one day be the tallest building west of Chicago. But before it could get off the ground, someone had to make sure that ground was solid. Here’s the story of how the project was born.

A new study ranks L.A. as the second-most facial-hair friendly city in U.S. Boston ranks first, while Miami, Chicago, Salt Lake City, Minneapolis, Austin, Seattle, Denver and Nashville round out the top 10.
Californians made a good showing in last year’s World Beard and Moustache Championships. L.A.’s own Dan Lawlor, seen above, won the Freestyle Moustache category. 
Photo: Franziska Kraufmann / EPA

A new study ranks L.A. as the second-most facial-hair friendly city in U.S. Boston ranks first, while Miami, Chicago, Salt Lake City, Minneapolis, Austin, Seattle, Denver and Nashville round out the top 10.

Californians made a good showing in last year’s World Beard and Moustache Championships. L.A.’s own Dan Lawlor, seen above, won the Freestyle Moustache category. 

Photo: Franziska Kraufmann / EPA

Beet tarragon gelato, anyone? How about saffron pistachio? Here are some of L.A.’s most interesting ice cream flavors.

Beet tarragon gelato, anyone? How about saffron pistachio? Here are some of L.A.’s most interesting ice cream flavors.

How many people are actually paying to ride L.A.’s trains? Figuring out how many of last year’s 115 million riders paid their fares and rode the trains legally has become a vexing question with important consequences. Above, you can see how L.A.’s train system developed, with the size of each bubble indicating how many ticket scans each station had in 2013 and the first four months of 2014. L.A. County Metropolitan Transportation Authority started locking turnstiles last year.

How many people are actually paying to ride L.A.’s trains? Figuring out how many of last year’s 115 million riders paid their fares and rode the trains legally has become a vexing question with important consequences. Above, you can see how L.A.’s train system developed, with the size of each bubble indicating how many ticket scans each station had in 2013 and the first four months of 2014. L.A. County Metropolitan Transportation Authority started locking turnstiles last year.