The population of L.A. County has passed 10 million, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. It’s the most populous county in the U.S., with nearly twice as many residents as the runner-up, Illinois’ Cook County.

Photo: The CicLAvia event in L.A. in 2013. Credit: Genaro Molina / Los Angeles Times

The population of L.A. County has passed 10 million, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. It’s the most populous county in the U.S., with nearly twice as many residents as the runner-up, Illinois’ Cook County.

Photo: The CicLAvia event in L.A. in 2013. Credit: Genaro Molina / Los Angeles Times

losangelespast:

A daredevil in golfing attire traipses along a steel beam high above the street during construction of the Los Angeles City Hall, 1927. The Hall of Justice and the old courthouse can be seen in the background.

losangelespast:

A daredevil in golfing attire traipses along a steel beam high above the street during construction of the Los Angeles City Hall, 1927. The Hall of Justice and the old courthouse can be seen in the background.

test reblogged from losangelespast

Gentrification forcing some L.A. gangs to commute to their turf

Los Angeles’ Echo Park, once a familiar stomping ground for the area’s gangs, has recently been hit with a wave of gentrification, with boutiques, coffee shops and rent increases displacing gang members.

Pushed out by this activity, many have been commuting to their turf only on the weekends, rapidly diminishing gang activity in the area. And now an injunction has been placed on Echo Park gangs, prohibiting them from congregating in a “safety zone” that envelops the neighborhood - even if they already live within its boundaries.

Officials praise it as a tool to make the neighborhood safer, but some residents say it places an unfair focus on minorities.

"The cops creep by and give me a look," said Salvador Aguirre, an Echo Park native who protested the injunction this summer.

"Being bald and Mexican American, we’re all looked at the same. We’re all the problems. I don’t want to be looked at twice."

Read reporter Marisa Gerber’s full story here.

Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times

Foggy Hill Street tunnels
A look at the Hill Street tunnels, seen from Temple Street in downtown L.A., circa 1954.
Photo: Howard Maxwell / Los Angeles Times

Foggy Hill Street tunnels

A look at the Hill Street tunnels, seen from Temple Street in downtown L.A., circa 1954.

Photo: Howard Maxwell / Los Angeles Times

How many snakes can you fit into one house?
Maybe one if you’re a little squeamish about them? A few dozen if you don’t particularly care about seeing a bunch peek out from your laundry hamper or pantry?Now try and imagine having as many as 400 snakes in your house. That’s just what police found at a home in Santa Ana earlier today while serving a police warrant. Officers reportedly could smell the stench of the snakes, many of which were in terrible condition, if not dead, from up to 300 feet away.
Read the full, sad story over at L.A. Now.
Photo: Irfan Khan / Los Angeles Times

How many snakes can you fit into one house?

Maybe one if you’re a little squeamish about them? A few dozen if you don’t particularly care about seeing a bunch peek out from your laundry hamper or pantry?

Now try and imagine having as many as 400 snakes in your house. That’s just what police found at a home in Santa Ana earlier today while serving a police warrant. Officers reportedly could smell the stench of the snakes, many of which were in terrible condition, if not dead, from up to 300 feet away.

Read the full, sad story over at L.A. Now.

Photo: Irfan Khan / Los Angeles Times

wired:

Look at all those subway stops! No, it’s not NYC. This is what San Francisco and L.A. could look like…

If you live in a city and take public transit, you’ve probably looked at the system map and thought to yourself, “I wish this thing went everywhere.”

You’re not alone. There’s a whole bunch of daydreamers just like you who’ve considered the additional subway lines, bus routes, and train tracks it would take to bring more people to more places. Some of them have even mapped these ideas out. The internet is full of these fantasy transit maps, where professional transit planners and dedicated amateurs alike imagine how public transit in our cities could look.

[MORE: 13 Fake Public Transit Systems We Wish Existed]

One day Los Angeles, one day…

test reblogged from wired

Santa Monica’s famous mosaic home

Aziz and Louise Farnam started their decoration habits humbly enough - putting a single periwinkle square up into the corner of a retaining wall in their Santa Monica home. But things quickly, and colorfully, escalated from there:

Theycollected pieces of cobalt blue, aqua, plum and yellows from pale to sunny. They broke or cut them with special nippers into irregular shapes and applied those to the wall, letting them radiate in no particular pattern from the original piece.

They finished that wall, then tiled the walkway to the front door.

From there, things escalated — to a traffic-stopping degree. Motorists routinely slam on their brakes to marvel at the eccentric artistry.

"Everyone knows my house," Louise said. "Just say ‘mosaic tile house in Santa Monica.’"

Read more in our latest Column One feature.

Photos: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

Los Angeles is built on top of a lost city of Lizard People
Or at least, that’s how the theory goes. G. Warren Shufelt, an earnest engineer believed early last century that L.A. had been constructed on the same grounds as an ancient Lizard People stronghold, as mapped out above.
From our 1934 story on the bizarre belief:

Busy Los Angeles, although little realizing it in the hustle and bustle of modern existence, stands above a lost city of catacombs filled with incalculable treasure and imperishable records of a race of humans further advanced intellectually and scientifically than even the highest type of present day peoples, in the belief of G. Warren Shufelt, geophysical mining engineer now engaged in an attempt to wrest from the lost city deep in the earth below Fort Moore Hill the secrets of the Lizard People of legendary fame in the medicine lodges of the American Indian.

Read more on the lizard people whose former homes may rest right below your very feet at L.A. Times Past.

Los Angeles is built on top of a lost city of Lizard People

Or at least, that’s how the theory goes. G. Warren Shufelt, an earnest engineer believed early last century that L.A. had been constructed on the same grounds as an ancient Lizard People stronghold, as mapped out above.

From our 1934 story on the bizarre belief:

Busy Los Angeles, although little realizing it in the hustle and bustle of modern existence, stands above a lost city of catacombs filled with incalculable treasure and imperishable records of a race of humans further advanced intellectually and scientifically than even the highest type of present day peoples, in the belief of G. Warren Shufelt, geophysical mining engineer now engaged in an attempt to wrest from the lost city deep in the earth below Fort Moore Hill the secrets of the Lizard People of legendary fame in the medicine lodges of the American Indian.

Read more on the lizard people whose former homes may rest right below your very feet at L.A. Times Past.

Building a hockey rink in Dodgers Stadium

Saturday, right in the middle of Dodgers stadium, the Los Angeles Kings and Anaheim Ducks will face off in the first NHL regular season game held outdoors west of the Rocky Mountains.

But beyond the technical feat of having an ice rink in the middle of a warm L.A. January, there’s an intangible joy to the project.

As Dan Craig, the man leading the icy project put it:

"The satisfaction for me will be when the guys skate out there. Nobody has to tell me.

I’ll know well ahead of them what they’re going to feel, and I’ll know from how I see them skate and how I see their eyes and the expression on their face. When you get guys from 19 to 39 just grinning from ear to ear and loving being out there, that’s what we do.”

Read columnist Helene Elliott’s full story right here.

Photos: Wally Skalij / Los Angeles Times, Nick Ut / Associated Press

The rise of futsal: A miniature form of soccer

To be honest, we had no idea what futsal was when we saw that reporter Paresh Dave’s story was in the pipeline. But now we’re hooked and need to give it a shot.

Just peek at the intro of Dave’s story:

he amber lights flicker on above the tennis courts at DeForest Park in Long Beach. The nets have disappeared. Tennis balls are nowhere in sight. This evening, people are playing with a different kind of ball.

On the chain-link fence that surrounds the courts, spray paint marks the goals. Shots whiz by like cars on a freeway.

English and Spanish blend as players chant “Corre! Corre!” (“Run!”) and “Mira! Mira!” (“Look!”). The murmurs from onlookers — “nice” and “wow” — swell after each dazzling play.

The matches on this concrete court are quick. The first team to score wins. Losers retreat to wooden benches, ceding to the next challenger.

Read more on the numerous demographic, financial and athletic reasons for futsal’s increasing popularity right here.

Photos: Liz O. Baylen / Los Angeles Times

Chronicling Los Angeles’ “death alley” and beyond

image

A two mile corridor of South Vermont Ave. has become one of the most dangerous areas in the country, with sixty people killed in the area since 2007. And that stretch borders Westmont, a county that ranks as among L.A.’s most dangerous.

Westmont’s homicide figure is about the same as the combined total in Highland Park, Glendale, Pasadena, Eagle Rock, Glassell Park and Atwater Village, an area with 14 times as many residents and some neighborhoods that have experienced gang problems of their own.

Our newly-revamped Homicide Report will be keeping an eye on Westmont’s continued problems, along with documenting every other killing in L.A. County that may otherwise fall through the cracks.

Reporter Nicole Santa Cruz will continue to speak to families and neighborhoods impacted by tragedy, and our database of those who have fallen since 2007 continues to improve.

Examine the new Homicide Report right here, and feel free to reach out with any feedback you may have on how we can improve our efforts.

latimespast:

Twenty years ago this morning, Southern California awoke to the shaking of the Northridge earthquake. 
Share your memories here: Disaster before dawn — readers remember the Northridge earthquake
Read about what has changed in 20 years: Earthquake risks have evolved since Northridge
Prepare yourself and your family for the Big One: You live in earthquake country; get ready before the next one hits
The Times won a Pulitzer prize for its coverage 20 years ago. Reread some of our journalism from 1994: Northridge earthquake, 20 years later
And, in the strangest of coincidences, a 2.6 earthquake shook Universal City this morning: Quake hits on 20th anniversary of Northridge
— Matt Ballinger
Photo: Jan. 20, 1994: The Interstate 5 freeway near Newhall after damage from the Northridge earthquake. Credit: Al Seib / Los Angeles Times

latimespast:

Twenty years ago this morning, Southern California awoke to the shaking of the Northridge earthquake. 

Share your memories here: Disaster before dawn — readers remember the Northridge earthquake

Read about what has changed in 20 years: Earthquake risks have evolved since Northridge

Prepare yourself and your family for the Big One: You live in earthquake country; get ready before the next one hits

The Times won a Pulitzer prize for its coverage 20 years ago. Reread some of our journalism from 1994: Northridge earthquake, 20 years later

And, in the strangest of coincidences, a 2.6 earthquake shook Universal City this morning: Quake hits on 20th anniversary of Northridge

Matt Ballinger

Photo: Jan. 20, 1994: The Interstate 5 freeway near Newhall after damage from the Northridge earthquake. Credit: Al Seib / Los Angeles Times

test reblogged from latimespast

Wildfire rages northeast of Los Angeles

A fast-growing brush fire that ignited this morning has already burned through more than 200 acres near Glendora. Three individuals have been brought into custody under suspicion of being connected to the fires as the blaze continues.

Stay tuned to our live blog for continued coverage.

UPDATE:

As the Colby fire spreads to more than 1,700 acres, officials are warning residents from the San Gabriel Valley to the Pomona Valley to avoid the outdoors due to smoke and ash. A state of emergency has also been announced in Glendora.

Photos: Ringo H.W. Chiu, Nick Ut / Associated Press, Irfan Khan/ Los Angeles Times

Remembering the Northridge earthquake

Twenty years ago, a massive earthquake struck Los Angeles, killing an estimated 60 people and leaving billions of dollars in damages in its wake.

We’re looking to memorialize the quake on its Jan. 17 anniversary, so if you have stories from that tragic day, head over to L.A. Now and let your voice be heard.

Photos: Los Angeles Times archive

wolframalpha:

Traveling from LA to NYC would only take 33 hours if you rode on the back of a cheetah traveling its maximum land speed.

Time to see if someone in the office is willing to give it a shot.

wolframalpha:

Traveling from LA to NYC would only take 33 hours if you rode on the back of a cheetah traveling its maximum land speed.

Time to see if someone in the office is willing to give it a shot.

test reblogged from npr