Thanks for keeping me and my friends alive.
Jimmy Kimmel is taking the subway to the Emmys.

And is tweeting the experience.

Meanwhile, stars have been arriving on the red carpet. See photos here, and get full coverage of the Emmys here

"Generally I am not that ostentatious. It just seems like it is bad form to be bragging. But what the hell": Meet the Hollywood cameraman who insists he invented the celebrity selfie in 1981. He’s got a collection of selfies with people like Clint Eastwood, Jennifer Aniston, Charlton Heston, Renee Zellweger that have come since he took his first one with humorist Art Buchwald.
Photo: Mel Melcon / Los Angeles Times

"Generally I am not that ostentatious. It just seems like it is bad form to be bragging. But what the hell": Meet the Hollywood cameraman who insists he invented the celebrity selfie in 1981. He’s got a collection of selfies with people like Clint Eastwood, Jennifer Aniston, Charlton Heston, Renee Zellweger that have come since he took his first one with humorist Art Buchwald.

Photo: Mel Melcon / Los Angeles Times

latimespast:

If you’ve ever been to the TCL Chinese Theatre (formerly Mann’s, originally Grauman’s), you’ve probably walked over the handprints and footprints of Hollywood stars imprinted in the concrete. They’re a big tourist draw — you can see the stars’ signatures and compare your hands with the hands of the people on the big screen.
But the very first one was an accident.
The tradition was born after actress Norma Talmadge accompanied Sid Grauman — the theater magnate who was opening what is now a famous landmark — and other Hollywood stars to the site of the theater in 1927. At the construction site, Talmadge accidentally stepped in wet cement.
"When Grauman saw this, it gave him the idea of creating his own special hall of fame," a Feb. 3, 1958, Times story on a $400,000 renovation of the theater recounted.
That makes the handprint tradition older than the stars on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. That idea came about in the 1950s, with the first star set into the sidewalk in 1960.
Previously on L.A. Times Past:
The rise and fall of the Chinese theater’s dragons
Classic Hollywood on L.A. Times Past
— Laura E. Davis
Photo: Marilyn Monroe and Jane Russell put footprints in the cement at the Chinese Theater on June 27, 1953. Credit: Los Angeles Times / UCLA Library.

latimespast:

If you’ve ever been to the TCL Chinese Theatre (formerly Mann’s, originally Grauman’s), you’ve probably walked over the handprints and footprints of Hollywood stars imprinted in the concrete. They’re a big tourist draw — you can see the stars’ signatures and compare your hands with the hands of the people on the big screen.

But the very first one was an accident.

The tradition was born after actress Norma Talmadge accompanied Sid Grauman — the theater magnate who was opening what is now a famous landmark — and other Hollywood stars to the site of the theater in 1927. At the construction site, Talmadge accidentally stepped in wet cement.

"When Grauman saw this, it gave him the idea of creating his own special hall of fame," a Feb. 3, 1958, Times story on a $400,000 renovation of the theater recounted.

That makes the handprint tradition older than the stars on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. That idea came about in the 1950s, with the first star set into the sidewalk in 1960.

Previously on L.A. Times Past:

The rise and fall of the Chinese theater’s dragons

Classic Hollywood on L.A. Times Past

— Laura E. Davis

Photo: Marilyn Monroe and Jane Russell put footprints in the cement at the Chinese Theater on June 27, 1953. Credit: Los Angeles Times / UCLA Library.

test reblogged from latimespast

Leonardo DiCaprio though the years

A teen heartthrob who became one of the most accomplished actors of his generation, DiCaprio’s life has been thoroughly documented on film and in photos - above is just a sampling of Times photographers’ experiences with the star.

Photos: Kirk McCoy, Wally Skalij, Genaro Molina, Jay L. Clendenin / Los Angeles Times

"American Hustle," "12 Years a Slave" top the Golden Globes

It was a stellar night for the Globes, with “12 Years a Slave” taking the top drama award, “American Hustle” being honored for its acting and a much-deserved send-off for “Breaking Bad.”

With the Globes being the Globes, there were plenty of bizarre moments (Jacqueline Bisset, we’re looking your way) to accompany the plentiful booze.

And of course, photobombs:

Read more on last night’s ceremony right here.

Photos: Wally Skalij, Lawrence K. Ho / Los Angeles Times, E!

2014’s stars in the making

With the new year just beginning, we thought you may want to get an early jump on some of the filmmakers, performers and creators who could be grabbing headlines later this year.

Gia Coppola’s continuation of her family’s Hollywood legacy, Zara McFarlane’s reaffirmation of jazz’s vitality and the husband-and-wife team pushing the boundaries of what counts as a video game are just a glimpse of who may make it big this year.

And yes, while “Welcome to Night Vale,” is no stranger to Tumblr, we wouldn’t be surprised if the podcast’s creative team sees even greater success in months to come.

So want to see who else made the list, or think we may have left someone off? Head over to our full listing right here.

Photos: Brownswood Recordings, Rick Madonik / Toronto Star via Getty Images, Anton Nickel, Media Greenhouse

It may not be factual, but it’s truthful.

Mourning two titans of the classic silver screen

The film community lost two of its most iconic actors over the weekend, with the passing of Peter O’Toole, who died Saturday at age 81, and Joan Fontaine, who died Sunday at age 96.

Both were renowned for their talent: Fontaine was honored with an Academy Award for best actress for her brilliant role in 1941’s “Suspicion,” and was nominated the previous year of “Rebecca,” and O’Toole was nominated for a stunning eight Academy Awards without a single victory.

"Always the bridesmaid, never a bride," he quipped upon receiving an honorary Oscar in 2003.

Read more on their lasting legacies over at Movies Now.

Photos: Associated Press, Martha Hartnett / Los Angeles Times, RKO Radio

'12 Years a Slave,' 'American Hustle' lead Golden Globe nominees

With seven nominations each, ‘12 Years a Slave’ and ‘American Hustle’ have jumped to the forefront of the Academy Awards conversation, and will likely be the ongoing favorites as Hollywood’s awards season kicks into gear.

But the Globes’ honors just aren’t limited to those two films - plenty of others, along with television shows like “Breaking Bad” and “House of Cards” earned nominees. Check out the full list here.

Photos: Sony-Columbia Pictures, Fox Searchlight, IFC, Kevin Winter / Getty Images, Disney

Cougar takes the Hollywood limelightHats off to National Geographic photographer Steve Winter, for this fantastic photo of a cougar perfectly placed in front of the Hollywood sign.
NatGeo has the full story, including 14 months of waiting for a perfect shot, here.
Photo: Steve Winter / National Geographic

Cougar takes the Hollywood limelight

Hats off to 
National Geographic photographer Steve Winter, for this fantastic photo of a cougar perfectly placed in front of the Hollywood sign.

NatGeo has the full story, including 14 months of waiting for a perfect shot, here.

Photo: Steve Winter / National Geographic

losangelespast:

Under construction: A drive through Hollywoodland, 1930’s. 

losangelespast:

Under construction: A drive through Hollywoodland, 1930’s. 

test reblogged from losangelespast

Halloween in West Hollywood

Here’s to hoping your Halloween, whether you haunted the neighborhood looking for candy or stayed at home curling up with a horrifying film, was a good one! It certainly was for the tens of thousands who swarmed Santa Monica Boulevard for last night’s Halloween Carnival.

For a closer look, head over to Framework.

Photos: Wally Skalij / Los Angeles Times

Wallace Neff was considered a “starchitect” in the 1930s, designing homes for the Hollywood elite.  But he viewed his “Bubble House” his greatest architectural achievement.  At the end of World War Two, the United States was facing a housing shortage.  He designed these 1000 square foot “Bubble Houses” to be built entirely in 48 hours using an airform and gunite pressurized cement application process.  (See more about how they were made here)  

Bubble Houses were ultimately unsuccessful in the United States, because the circular and domed shape made it difficult to find furniture to fit, and wall space wasn’t easy to utilize.  However, these low-cost housing units proved quite popular in other countries, especially in Senegal, where a 1,200 unit colony was built and many still stand today. 

Top photo:  Wallace Neff in front of a bubble house at a construction site.
Bottom photo:  A “Double Bubble House”  

(This post was inspired by the most recent podcast from 99% Invisible.  Many more photos, and a great podcast can be found at their website here)

Today’s challenge: Use “starchitect” in regular conversation.

test reblogged from bbook