Thirty years ago tonight, Geraldine Ferraro made history by becoming the first woman ever to be a presidential or vice presidential nominee.
Photo: Associated Press

Thirty years ago tonight, Geraldine Ferraro made history by becoming the first woman ever to be a presidential or vice presidential nominee.

Photo: Associated Press

Alice Coachman, who in 1948 became the first African American woman to win an Olympic gold medal, has died. 
During her youth in Georgia, she wasn’t permitted to use public sports facilities because of the color of her skin; to practice high-jumping, the event that later won her the gold medal, she used rope or tied rags together to substitute for crossbars. When she returned home from the London Olympics in 1948, her hometown gave her a celebratory welcome, but she wasn’t allowed to speak at the ceremony and the mayor did not shake her hand.
Photo: Coachman wins the 1948 Women’s National Track Meet in Grand Rapids, Iowa. Credit: Associated Press

Alice Coachman, who in 1948 became the first African American woman to win an Olympic gold medal, has died

During her youth in Georgia, she wasn’t permitted to use public sports facilities because of the color of her skin; to practice high-jumping, the event that later won her the gold medal, she used rope or tied rags together to substitute for crossbars. When she returned home from the London Olympics in 1948, her hometown gave her a celebratory welcome, but she wasn’t allowed to speak at the ceremony and the mayor did not shake her hand.

Photo: Coachman wins the 1948 Women’s National Track Meet in Grand Rapids, Iowa. Credit: Associated Press

The skull of someone who may have died at Battle of Gettysburg could have ended up on someone’s mantle. 
An auction house in Pennsylvania was soliciting bids for what it described as a neat historical artifact: the skull of a Civil War veteran (authorities are trying to verify that claim). But, after threats of protests, the auction was called off. The remains will instead be donated to the federal museum at the Gettysburg battle site, where they will be put on display if their connection to the Civil War is verified.
Photo: Gettysburg National Military Park

The skull of someone who may have died at Battle of Gettysburg could have ended up on someone’s mantle

An auction house in Pennsylvania was soliciting bids for what it described as a neat historical artifact: the skull of a Civil War veteran (authorities are trying to verify that claim). But, after threats of protests, the auction was called off. The remains will instead be donated to the federal museum at the Gettysburg battle site, where they will be put on display if their connection to the Civil War is verified.

Photo: Gettysburg National Military Park

What is remarkable is that archaeological remains of the cabin were almost imperceptible.

Can Route 66 remain a tourist draw? The operator of the Wigwam Motel in San Bernardino is working to keep its culture alive.

Photos: Mark Boster / Los Angeles Times

In December, eighth-grade students in the Southern California city of Rialto were asked to research and write an argumentative essay about whether the Holocaust actually occurred.
The assignment prompted widespread outcry and criticism from such groups as the Anti-Defamation League and the Simon Wiesenthal Center, which called it “grotesque.”
At a packed emergency school board meeting Wednesday, officials again apologized. “From the bottom of my heart, I feel sorry for this whole thing happening,” the school district’s interim superintendent said. A district spokesperson declined to comment on whether the teachers involved faced any disciplinary action.
Photo: Attendees of Wednesday’s school board meeting, at which every seat was taken. Credit: Gina Ferazzi / Los Angeles Times

In December, eighth-grade students in the Southern California city of Rialto were asked to research and write an argumentative essay about whether the Holocaust actually occurred.

The assignment prompted widespread outcry and criticism from such groups as the Anti-Defamation League and the Simon Wiesenthal Center, which called it “grotesque.”

At a packed emergency school board meeting Wednesday, officials again apologized. “From the bottom of my heart, I feel sorry for this whole thing happening,” the school district’s interim superintendent said. A district spokesperson declined to comment on whether the teachers involved faced any disciplinary action.

Photo: Attendees of Wednesday’s school board meeting, at which every seat was taken. Credit: Gina Ferazzi / Los Angeles Times

I had to find a way to tell her she was not abandoned — she was rescued. She didn’t have to fear that no one wanted her.
This gourd was thought to contain the blood of France’s King Louis XVI. Turns out it probably doesn’t, according to a new DNA analysis.
Photo by Davide Pettener

This gourd was thought to contain the blood of France’s King Louis XVI. Turns out it probably doesn’t, according to a new DNA analysis.

Photo by Davide Pettener

First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt in the pages of the L.A. Times shortly after her husband’s inauguration, courtesy of our history Tumblr.
latimespast:

Eleanor Roosevelt, then the brand-new first lady, walked to church by herself, “shattering another precedent,” on March 12, 1933. This item was published in the L.A. Times the following day. (Her husband had just been sworn in earlier that month, on March 4.)

More from our archives: Here’s Mrs. Roosevelt five years later, during a tour of government relief activities in L.A., and back in L.A. for the 1960 Democratic National Convention in 1960.

First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt in the pages of the L.A. Times shortly after her husband’s inauguration, courtesy of our history Tumblr.

latimespast:

Eleanor Roosevelt, then the brand-new first lady, walked to church by herself, “shattering another precedent,” on March 12, 1933. This item was published in the L.A. Times the following day. (Her husband had just been sworn in earlier that month, on March 4.)

More from our archives: Here’s Mrs. Roosevelt five years later, during a tour of government relief activities in L.A., and back in L.A. for the 1960 Democratic National Convention in 1960.

test reblogged from latimespast

This is a 36-million-dollar cup.
Photo: Vincent Yu / Associated Press

This is a 36-million-dollar cup.

Photo: Vincent Yu / Associated Press

latimespast:

Here’s a look at downtown Culver City, circa 1920.
Credit: Los Angeles Times / UCLA Library

At the time this photo was taken, Culver City was less than a decade old. This 1913 L.A. Times article on what was then only “as yet a ‘city on paper’” described it as “a promising urban center half way between downtown Los Angeles and the Venice oceanfront.”
Nathan Masters has more on Culver City’s history, including its self-proclaimed stint as “the Heart of Screenland,” at KCET.

latimespast:

Here’s a look at downtown Culver City, circa 1920.

Credit: Los Angeles Times / UCLA Library

At the time this photo was taken, Culver City was less than a decade old. This 1913 L.A. Times article on what was then only “as yet a ‘city on paper’” described it as “a promising urban center half way between downtown Los Angeles and the Venice oceanfront.”

Nathan Masters has more on Culver City’s history, including its self-proclaimed stint as “the Heart of Screenland,” at KCET.

test reblogged from latimespast

latimespast:

Downtown Los Angeles, 70 years ago: This is the intersection of Broadway and 7th as it looked in 1943.
Photo: UCLA Library / Los Angeles Times

PSA: L.A. Times Past is our Tumblr for vintage photography, news coverage, advertising and more from The Times’ 132-year history (also on Twitter @latimespast).

latimespast:

Downtown Los Angeles, 70 years ago: This is the intersection of Broadway and 7th as it looked in 1943.

Photo: UCLA Library / Los Angeles Times

PSA: L.A. Times Past is our Tumblr for vintage photography, news coverage, advertising and more from The Times’ 132-year history (also on Twitter @latimespast).

test reblogged from latimespast

March 31 is Cesar Chavez’s birthday, and three states, including California, officially recognize Cesar Chavez Day as a holiday. Here’s a photographic look at the life and work of the late activist, whose campaign to organize farm workers still inspires.

Top photo: Chavez speaks to members of the United Farm Workers during a rally in the Imperial Valley on Feb. 2, 1979. Credit: Steve Fontanini / Los Angeles Times. Bottom photo: Chavez speaks at the United Farm Workers political endorsement conference in Los Angeles on Sept. 7, 1980. The conference endorsed Jimmy Carter. Credit: Los Angeles Times.
Memories of Beatlemania

latimespast:

Beatlemania in Los Angeles

Times readers are sharing their memories of Beatlemania ahead of the 50th anniversary of the Fab Four’s first performance on the “Ed Sullivan Show,” Feb. 9, 1964.

Are you still hoarse from all that screaming? Tell us.

Matt Ballinger

Photo: A Los Angeles Beatles fan in 1964. This photo ran in The Times on Aug. 24, 1964. Credit: Los Angeles Times / UCLA Library 

And since almost everyone has a favorite Beatles song, reblog with yours!

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