First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt in the pages of the L.A. Times shortly after her husband’s inauguration, courtesy of our history Tumblr.
latimespast:

Eleanor Roosevelt, then the brand-new first lady, walked to church by herself, “shattering another precedent,” on March 12, 1933. This item was published in the L.A. Times the following day. (Her husband had just been sworn in earlier that month, on March 4.)

More from our archives: Here’s Mrs. Roosevelt five years later, during a tour of government relief activities in L.A., and back in L.A. for the 1960 Democratic National Convention in 1960.

First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt in the pages of the L.A. Times shortly after her husband’s inauguration, courtesy of our history Tumblr.

latimespast:

Eleanor Roosevelt, then the brand-new first lady, walked to church by herself, “shattering another precedent,” on March 12, 1933. This item was published in the L.A. Times the following day. (Her husband had just been sworn in earlier that month, on March 4.)

More from our archives: Here’s Mrs. Roosevelt five years later, during a tour of government relief activities in L.A., and back in L.A. for the 1960 Democratic National Convention in 1960.

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This is a 36-million-dollar cup.
Photo: Vincent Yu / Associated Press

This is a 36-million-dollar cup.

Photo: Vincent Yu / Associated Press

latimespast:

Here’s a look at downtown Culver City, circa 1920.
Credit: Los Angeles Times / UCLA Library

At the time this photo was taken, Culver City was less than a decade old. This 1913 L.A. Times article on what was then only “as yet a ‘city on paper’” described it as “a promising urban center half way between downtown Los Angeles and the Venice oceanfront.”
Nathan Masters has more on Culver City’s history, including its self-proclaimed stint as “the Heart of Screenland,” at KCET.

latimespast:

Here’s a look at downtown Culver City, circa 1920.

Credit: Los Angeles Times / UCLA Library

At the time this photo was taken, Culver City was less than a decade old. This 1913 L.A. Times article on what was then only “as yet a ‘city on paper’” described it as “a promising urban center half way between downtown Los Angeles and the Venice oceanfront.”

Nathan Masters has more on Culver City’s history, including its self-proclaimed stint as “the Heart of Screenland,” at KCET.

test reblogged from latimespast

latimespast:

Downtown Los Angeles, 70 years ago: This is the intersection of Broadway and 7th as it looked in 1943.
Photo: UCLA Library / Los Angeles Times

PSA: L.A. Times Past is our Tumblr for vintage photography, news coverage, advertising and more from The Times’ 132-year history (also on Twitter @latimespast).

latimespast:

Downtown Los Angeles, 70 years ago: This is the intersection of Broadway and 7th as it looked in 1943.

Photo: UCLA Library / Los Angeles Times

PSA: L.A. Times Past is our Tumblr for vintage photography, news coverage, advertising and more from The Times’ 132-year history (also on Twitter @latimespast).

test reblogged from latimespast

March 31 is Cesar Chavez’s birthday, and three states, including California, officially recognize Cesar Chavez Day as a holiday. Here’s a photographic look at the life and work of the late activist, whose campaign to organize farm workers still inspires.

Top photo: Chavez speaks to members of the United Farm Workers during a rally in the Imperial Valley on Feb. 2, 1979. Credit: Steve Fontanini / Los Angeles Times. Bottom photo: Chavez speaks at the United Farm Workers political endorsement conference in Los Angeles on Sept. 7, 1980. The conference endorsed Jimmy Carter. Credit: Los Angeles Times.
Memories of Beatlemania

latimespast:

Beatlemania in Los Angeles

Times readers are sharing their memories of Beatlemania ahead of the 50th anniversary of the Fab Four’s first performance on the “Ed Sullivan Show,” Feb. 9, 1964.

Are you still hoarse from all that screaming? Tell us.

Matt Ballinger

Photo: A Los Angeles Beatles fan in 1964. This photo ran in The Times on Aug. 24, 1964. Credit: Los Angeles Times / UCLA Library 

And since almost everyone has a favorite Beatles song, reblog with yours!

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losangelespast:

A daredevil in golfing attire traipses along a steel beam high above the street during construction of the Los Angeles City Hall, 1927. The Hall of Justice and the old courthouse can be seen in the background.

losangelespast:

A daredevil in golfing attire traipses along a steel beam high above the street during construction of the Los Angeles City Hall, 1927. The Hall of Justice and the old courthouse can be seen in the background.

test reblogged from losangelespast

Los Angeles is built on top of a lost city of Lizard People
Or at least, that’s how the theory goes. G. Warren Shufelt, an earnest engineer believed early last century that L.A. had been constructed on the same grounds as an ancient Lizard People stronghold, as mapped out above.
From our 1934 story on the bizarre belief:

Busy Los Angeles, although little realizing it in the hustle and bustle of modern existence, stands above a lost city of catacombs filled with incalculable treasure and imperishable records of a race of humans further advanced intellectually and scientifically than even the highest type of present day peoples, in the belief of G. Warren Shufelt, geophysical mining engineer now engaged in an attempt to wrest from the lost city deep in the earth below Fort Moore Hill the secrets of the Lizard People of legendary fame in the medicine lodges of the American Indian.

Read more on the lizard people whose former homes may rest right below your very feet at L.A. Times Past.

Los Angeles is built on top of a lost city of Lizard People

Or at least, that’s how the theory goes. G. Warren Shufelt, an earnest engineer believed early last century that L.A. had been constructed on the same grounds as an ancient Lizard People stronghold, as mapped out above.

From our 1934 story on the bizarre belief:

Busy Los Angeles, although little realizing it in the hustle and bustle of modern existence, stands above a lost city of catacombs filled with incalculable treasure and imperishable records of a race of humans further advanced intellectually and scientifically than even the highest type of present day peoples, in the belief of G. Warren Shufelt, geophysical mining engineer now engaged in an attempt to wrest from the lost city deep in the earth below Fort Moore Hill the secrets of the Lizard People of legendary fame in the medicine lodges of the American Indian.

Read more on the lizard people whose former homes may rest right below your very feet at L.A. Times Past.

"The most important civil rights leader you’ve never heard of"
Bayard Rustin was an early leader in the civil rights movement, a man who played a pivotal role in the formation of Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.’s spirited call for nonviolent resistance and certainly worthy of a mention on the holiday established in King’s honor.

Rustin provided an influential backbone for a movement gaining momentum with every passing year, but as his biographer Tom Wicker wrote:

"…Rustin also was gay, decades before the Supreme Court legitimated private sexual activity, and that cost him the backing of even some radicals, black as well as white, for whom he had been an eloquent and courageous leader for nearly 40 years.”

Read more on Rustin over at Jacket Copy.
Art: Dugald Stermer / For the Times

"The most important civil rights leader you’ve never heard of"

Bayard Rustin was an early leader in the civil rights movement, a man who played a pivotal role in the formation of Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.’s spirited call for nonviolent resistance and certainly worthy of a mention on the holiday established in King’s honor.
Rustin provided an influential backbone for a movement gaining momentum with every passing year, but as his biographer Tom Wicker wrote:
"…Rustin also was gay, decades before the Supreme Court legitimated private sexual activity, and that cost him the backing of even some radicals, black as well as white, for whom he had been an eloquent and courageous leader for nearly 40 years.”
Read more on Rustin over at Jacket Copy.

Art: Dugald Stermer / For the Times

Remembering Martin Luther King Jr.

Today, a nation remembers and honors the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., whose struggle for civil rights continues to inspire on his 85th birthday anniversary.

King’s landmark moment was perhaps the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, which was celebrated just last year during its 50th anniversary.

As Vernon Watkins, a march attendee, recollected:

"He just leaned into the moment," Watkins said. "Looked out at the crowd the way Baptist preachers do and gave them what they needed: that idea of the dream. You might have to wait, but if you fight for dignity, everything is going to be OK."

King prodded him to imagine an America racially unified instead of divided. Still, it was the entire afternoon, taken together, that left the most lasting impression: the camaraderie, the thoughtfulness, the feeling that if a gathering like this could take place, it was time for Watkins to expand his horizons.

Photos: Gene Herrick, Charles Gorry / Associated Press, Brendan Smialowski / AFP/Getty Images

latimespast:

This Throwback Thursday, we’re taking you back in time at the happiest place on earth. Yes, we’ve dug into our archives and found some old Disneyland photos, including some of Walt Disney himself (seen in the middle photo inspecting plastic heads for a “Pirates of the Caribbean” addition to the park) and then-Vice President Richard Nixon (shaking hands with a man in a spacesuit in the bottom photo).

But perhaps the sweetest and most surprising story is behind the top photo. It’s of 14-year-old Jong Sook Kim visiting Disneyland in 1964. She was from South Korea and was in America to get surgery on her eyes — doctors once thought she’d never see again. After the operation in San Francisco, she went to see Disneyland with her newly restored sight.

Read more and see more photos here

Laura E. Davis

(Photos: Los Angeles Times / UCLA Library)

A Throwback Thursday so good it survived until the weekend.

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latimespast:

Twenty years ago this morning, Southern California awoke to the shaking of the Northridge earthquake. 
Share your memories here: Disaster before dawn — readers remember the Northridge earthquake
Read about what has changed in 20 years: Earthquake risks have evolved since Northridge
Prepare yourself and your family for the Big One: You live in earthquake country; get ready before the next one hits
The Times won a Pulitzer prize for its coverage 20 years ago. Reread some of our journalism from 1994: Northridge earthquake, 20 years later
And, in the strangest of coincidences, a 2.6 earthquake shook Universal City this morning: Quake hits on 20th anniversary of Northridge
— Matt Ballinger
Photo: Jan. 20, 1994: The Interstate 5 freeway near Newhall after damage from the Northridge earthquake. Credit: Al Seib / Los Angeles Times

latimespast:

Twenty years ago this morning, Southern California awoke to the shaking of the Northridge earthquake. 

Share your memories here: Disaster before dawn — readers remember the Northridge earthquake

Read about what has changed in 20 years: Earthquake risks have evolved since Northridge

Prepare yourself and your family for the Big One: You live in earthquake country; get ready before the next one hits

The Times won a Pulitzer prize for its coverage 20 years ago. Reread some of our journalism from 1994: Northridge earthquake, 20 years later

And, in the strangest of coincidences, a 2.6 earthquake shook Universal City this morning: Quake hits on 20th anniversary of Northridge

Matt Ballinger

Photo: Jan. 20, 1994: The Interstate 5 freeway near Newhall after damage from the Northridge earthquake. Credit: Al Seib / Los Angeles Times

test reblogged from latimespast

A first responder to the Northridge earthquake in a “dead, dead, dead black” valley
Shaken out of his bed at Station 70, firefighter Mike Henry tasted dust as he left a partially collapsed fire station to respond to the 6.7 Northridge earthquake 20 years ago today.
As the fire truck went down Reseda Boulevard, residents urged the responders to stop at their apartment. A man from a complex named Northridge Meadows screamed, “There’s a guy trapped under the building. And I’m talking to him.” But the responders had to keep going.
Later in the day, they retraced their path back down the boulevard. And residents sounded relieved: All had been accounted for in most apartments.
Until they came to Northridge Meadows:

[Henry had] assumed it was a two-story complex on the initial drive-through, but now he realized that some of the second and third floors had actually pancaked on top of the first. Numbers began to race through his mind. Fifteen to 20 apartments per floor, he guessed. At least two people per unit. Forty. Fifty. Sixty people, maybe. All trapped.

Read Henry’s full story about Northridge Meadows in our latest Column One feature by reporter Marisa Gerber.
Photo: Richard Derk / Los Angeles Times
-Daniel Rothberg

A first responder to the Northridge earthquake in a “dead, dead, dead black” valley

Shaken out of his bed at Station 70, firefighter Mike Henry tasted dust as he left a partially collapsed fire station to respond to the 6.7 Northridge earthquake 20 years ago today.

As the fire truck went down Reseda Boulevard, residents urged the responders to stop at their apartment. A man from a complex named Northridge Meadows screamed, “There’s a guy trapped under the building. And I’m talking to him.” But the responders had to keep going.

Later in the day, they retraced their path back down the boulevard. And residents sounded relieved: All had been accounted for in most apartments.

Until they came to Northridge Meadows:

[Henry had] assumed it was a two-story complex on the initial drive-through, but now he realized that some of the second and third floors had actually pancaked on top of the first. Numbers began to race through his mind. Fifteen to 20 apartments per floor, he guessed. At least two people per unit. Forty. Fifty. Sixty people, maybe. All trapped.

Read Henry’s full story about Northridge Meadows in our latest Column One feature by reporter Marisa Gerber.

Photo: Richard Derk / Los Angeles Times

-Daniel Rothberg

Remembering the Northridge earthquake

Twenty years ago, a massive earthquake struck Los Angeles, killing an estimated 60 people and leaving billions of dollars in damages in its wake.

We’re looking to memorialize the quake on its Jan. 17 anniversary, so if you have stories from that tragic day, head over to L.A. Now and let your voice be heard.

Photos: Los Angeles Times archive

The hairy, mysterious “Jungle Boy”
Above is a photo of the 1950s-era wrestler known as “Jungle Boy,” vividly introduced by reporter Don Snyder:

The night has a thousand eyes. They glow like burning coals full of hate, blood, vinegar, old lemon juice and cigar smog. From their darkened sanctuaries they peer maliciously at the snarling figure before them.
For out there, on the white square where central lights beam down on the rope-caged canvas lurks the hairy horror. He is Jungle Boy, wrestler at large.
Small children sneer at him. Big men jeer at him. Medium-sized women leer at him. All other sized fans sneer, jeer and leer at him simultaneously.
It is one madhouse of screams inside the Olympic emporium. It is so noisy the barking crackerjacks man cannot put over his bargains.

The photo eventually won first place in an Associated Press contest for California and Nevada, but despite the acclaim, Jungle Boy’s identity remains unknown.
Photo: Art Rogers / Los Angeles Times

The hairy, mysterious “Jungle Boy”

Above is a photo of the 1950s-era wrestler known as “Jungle Boy,” vividly introduced by reporter Don Snyder:

The night has a thousand eyes. They glow like burning coals full of hate, blood, vinegar, old lemon juice and cigar smog. From their darkened sanctuaries they peer maliciously at the snarling figure before them.

For out there, on the white square where central lights beam down on the rope-caged canvas lurks the hairy horror. He is Jungle Boy, wrestler at large.

Small children sneer at him. Big men jeer at him. Medium-sized women leer at him. All other sized fans sneer, jeer and leer at him simultaneously.

It is one madhouse of screams inside the Olympic emporium. It is so noisy the barking crackerjacks man cannot put over his bargains.

The photo eventually won first place in an Associated Press contest for California and Nevada, but despite the acclaim, Jungle Boy’s identity remains unknown.

Photo: Art Rogers / Los Angeles Times