If you ever do that to me again, I’ll throw you off this [bleeping] balcony … You’re not man enough. I’ll break you in half. Like a boy.

Rapid escalation of clashes in Kiev

Three demonstrators have been killed in the Ukrainian capitol of Kiev, as protesters and police hunker down amid the debate over whether the country should build closer ties to the European Union.

The country’s government, led by prime minister Mykola Azarov, has sought to legitimize protesters by force and by law, enacting harsh restrictions on the right for demonstrations.

Follow the latest on the protests over at World Now.

Photos: Sergei Grits, Darko Vojinovic / Associated Press, Sergei Supinsky / AFP/Getty Images

Is Los Angeles a city in decline?

According to a report released today by the Los Angeles 2020 Commission, our city is strangled by traffic, riddled with poverty and led by a directionless government, with grim prospects for the future.

As the report declares:

“The city where the future once came to happen has been living in the past and leaving tomorrow to sort itself out.”

In a strange bit of timing, GQ recently declared that downtown L.A. is “America’s next city,” so at least not everyone’s so down on our town.

What do you think the future holds for L.A.?

Photos: Al Seib, Arkasha Stevenson, Jay L. Clendenin, Robert Gauthier / Los Angeles Times 

Are we just going to go have an ice cream and complain? Or are we going to do something about it?

2013’s protests and demonstrations

From the streets of Sao Paulo, Brazil, the capital of the Ukraine and Egypt following the furor over the removal of former Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi, the demand to be heard, and unrest over political injustices was far from quiet over the past year.

See the rest of our selections here.

Photos: Sedat Suna, Abed Al Hashlamoun / EPA, Felipe Dana / Associated Press, Sergei Supinsky / AFP/Getty Images

Seattle’s socialist, Occupy-approved city council member

Seattle has long been a bastion for liberal politics, but newly-elected City Councilwoman Kshama Sawant pushes the city’s political envelope with her avowed ties to socialism and the Occupy movement. The city’s more conservative political figures are skeptical of Sawant, but her supporters have successfully rallied around her, and her central call for a $15 minimum wage.

Says Sawant of her position outside of the typical political structure:

"It is time, high time, that we workers opt for a mass political alternative to the two big-business parties!"

Read through reporter Maria L. La Ganga’s profile of Sawant in its entirety here.

Photos: Alan Berner / Seattle Times, Ted S. Warren / Associated Press

John F. Kennedy’s rise to the presidency, in photos

As we near the 50th anniversary of Kennedy’s assassination on Nov. 22, 1963, Framework takes a look back at some of our own coverage of the nation’s most photogenic president.

Photos: Larry Sharkey, S.A. Hixson, William Murphy / Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles Times archives

newyorker:

Read about next week’s cover, “Reboot,” by Barry Blitt, online now: http://nyr.kr/1cufZex

Another shot across the bow of the much-maligned launch of healthcare.gov, which new documents reveal successful signed up just a handful of people in its opening day.

newyorker:

Read about next week’s cover, “Reboot,” by Barry Blitt, online now: http://nyr.kr/1cufZex

Another shot across the bow of the much-maligned launch of healthcare.gov, which new documents reveal successful signed up just a handful of people in its opening day.

test reblogged from newyorker

In the small, rural community of Reserve, children waiting for the school bus gather inside wooden and mesh cages provided as protection from wolves. Parents consider the “kid cages” a reasonable precaution.
L.A. Times Past: Nixon administration turmoil

latimespast:

image

On Oct. 10, 1973, Vice President Spiro Agnew resigned. He was only the second U.S. vice president to resign. (There is no third. John C. Calhoun, a central figure in the Nullification Crisis of the early 1830s, was the first; he resigned Dec. 28, 1832. If only The Times’ archive went…

test reblogged from latimespast

npr:

Everyone the U.S. Government Owes Money To, in One Graph (via Planet Money)

Meanwhile, House Republicans and President Obama are inching toward a possible deal that would temporarily extend the debt ceiling for six weeks.

npr:

Everyone the U.S. Government Owes Money To, in One Graph (via Planet Money)

Meanwhile, House Republicans and President Obama are inching toward a possible deal that would temporarily extend the debt ceiling for six weeks.

test reblogged from npr

California’s landmark recall election, a decade later

Ten years ago, California soured on Gov. Gray Davis less than a year after he had been reelected, and decided to hold just the second gubernatorial recall election in U.S. history. What followed was one of the strangest political shows in recent memory:

The spectacle — a snap election featuring a color wheel of 135 candidates, including a former child actor, a porn star and a handful of professional politicians — shook California from its usual political slumber and captivated an audience that watched from around the world.

As for the lasting legacy of the recall, which replaced Davis with actor, bodybuilder and frequent T800 Arnold Schwarzenegger in the state capitol:

…many say the historic election heightened awareness of state government and gave Californians a greater sense of empowerment, even if it failed to extinguish the flickering animosity toward Sacramento. For good or ill, the recall served notice on California’s political class, and still looms as a threat over all those holding elective office.

But there’s still plenty of work to be done in the wake of 2003’s electoral zeal. For more, read reporter Mark Z. Barabak’s full story here.

Photos: Mark Boster / Los Angeles Times, Robert Galbraith / Associated Press

theatlantic:

'The First Time a Tumblr Has Been Used in an Argument in a Supreme Court Brief'

On October 8, the Supreme Court will hear arguments in McCutcheon v. Federal Election Commission. The case centers on whether aggregate limits on donations to campaigns are constitutional, an extension of the legal logic behind the infamous Citizens United decision.
Before the Court hears arguments, though, the justices will have already consulted something unique: A legal document predicated on a Tumblr. According to Lawrence Lessig, the Harvard Law professor filing the brief, it’s the first time a Tumblr has been used in a Supreme Court filing.
Read more. [Image: Charlie Loyd]


There’s a first time for everything!

theatlantic:

'The First Time a Tumblr Has Been Used in an Argument in a Supreme Court Brief'

On October 8, the Supreme Court will hear arguments in McCutcheon v. Federal Election Commission. The case centers on whether aggregate limits on donations to campaigns are constitutional, an extension of the legal logic behind the infamous Citizens United decision.

Before the Court hears arguments, though, the justices will have already consulted something unique: A legal document predicated on a Tumblr. According to Lawrence Lessig, the Harvard Law professor filing the brief, it’s the first time a Tumblr has been used in a Supreme Court filing.

Read more. [Image: Charlie Loyd]

There’s a first time for everything!

test reblogged from theatlantic

Previewing the presidential pitch on Syria

Obama administration officials have tried to make the case for military action against Syria for over a week now, but with the public largely against intervention and congressional approval looking shaky, the president himself will address the nation tonight.

Complicating the issue is a Russian proposal, first suggested by Secretary of State John Kerry in an off-the-cuff remark, that Syria avoid an attack by giving up its chemical weapons for eventual dismantling.

And though Obama has said that a “credible” military threat to Syria must be maintained, he did tell CBS News yesterday that the weapons deal could be “a potentially significant breakthrough.”

So can Obama convince the nearly 6 in 10 Americans who oppose military strikes? It doesn’t appear likely: As reported by our own Evan Halper, presidential addresses are historically ineffective at shaping public opinion.

Even Franklin D. Roosevelt found that speeches could fall flat. He took on the U.S. Supreme Court in a 1937 national radio address after it struck down a big part of his New Deal program. He touted a plan to increase the size of the court so he could appoint more justices. The plan failed in Congress nonetheless.

Read through our primer of the ongoing debate over Syria here.

Photos: Sana, CBS News / Associated Press, Nicholas Kamm / AFP/Getty Images