Gay marriage bans struck down in western states
The Supreme Court’s surprising move today to turn down all pending state appeals in gay-marriage cases means that gay marriage will be legal in most of the nation. Here’s a look at where it’s allowed and where it’s not.

The Supreme Court’s surprising move today to turn down all pending state appeals in gay-marriage cases means that gay marriage will be legal in most of the nation. Here’s a look at where it’s allowed and where it’s not.

Frank Schaefer, a Methodist minister who was defrocked six months ago after officiating at his son’s same-sex wedding, won his appeal to have his religious credentials restored today.
"I’m just elated,” he told The Times. "It was a victory for me, for the church and for the LGBT community."
Photo: Schaefer speaks during a news conference at the First United Methodist Church of Germantown in Philadelphia. Credit: Matt Rourke / Associated Press

Frank Schaefer, a Methodist minister who was defrocked six months ago after officiating at his son’s same-sex wedding, won his appeal to have his religious credentials restored today.

"I’m just elated,” he told The Times. "It was a victory for me, for the church and for the LGBT community."

Photo: Schaefer speaks during a news conference at the First United Methodist Church of Germantown in Philadelphia. Credit: Matt Rourke / Associated Press

Marriage is a fundamental right of all citizens, which neither tradition nor the majority may deny.

A victorious year for the gay marriage movement

Whether it was a pair of landmark Supreme Court rulings invalidating the Defense of Marriage Act and ending the possible return of California’s Proposition 8 banning gay marriage, or legalization of same sex marriage in states across the country, 2013 was a year to remember for gay rights.

Read more over at Nation Now.

Photos: Justin Lane / EPA, Susannah Kay, Wally Skalij / Los Angeles Times, Jeff Chiu / Associated Press

California’s Supreme Court has refused to stop same-sex weddings while it is considering a legal bid to revive Prop 8:

The court rejected a request by ProtectMarriage, the sponsors of the 2008 ballot measure, to stop the issuing of marriage licenses to same-sex couples while considering the group’s contention that a federal judge’s injunction against the marriage ban did not apply statewide.
The court is not expected to rule on the group’s petition until August, at the earliest.

ProtectMarriage made its request of the state Supreme Court on Friday.
Photo: Demonstrators gathered in front of the U.S. Supreme Court as the justices heard arguments over same-sex marriage on March 27. Credit: Olivier Douliery / McClatchy-Tribune News Service

California’s Supreme Court has refused to stop same-sex weddings while it is considering a legal bid to revive Prop 8:

The court rejected a request by ProtectMarriage, the sponsors of the 2008 ballot measure, to stop the issuing of marriage licenses to same-sex couples while considering the group’s contention that a federal judge’s injunction against the marriage ban did not apply statewide.

The court is not expected to rule on the group’s petition until August, at the earliest.

ProtectMarriage made its request of the state Supreme Court on Friday.

Photo: Demonstrators gathered in front of the U.S. Supreme Court as the justices heard arguments over same-sex marriage on March 27. Credit: Olivier Douliery / McClatchy-Tribune News Service

Opposition to gay marriage reemerges in California

Supporters of Prop. 8, which was recently stuck down by the Supreme Court in a landmark decision, have put forth their latest tactic against gay marriage.

ProtectMarriage, which sponsored Prop. 8, issued a request that clerks not issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples to the state’s Supreme Court.

Despite their persistence, ProtectMarriage’s chances of making any change appear slim:

Legal experts predicted the California court would reject the challenge. Lawyers for the gay couples who fought Proposition 8 in federal court said they anticipated such an action and were prepared to respond to it. They said a state court may not interfere with a federal court’s decision.

Read more on the latest challenge to gay marriage over at L.A. Now.

Photos: Kevork Djansezian / Getty Images

Looking back on five years of marriage in California

The Times profiled Paul Waters and Kevin Voecks back in 2008, when they were among the first wave of same-sex couples to be married in California.

Five years later, with Proposition 8 coming to an end after the Supreme Court’s decision yesterday, photo editor Jeremiah Bogert revisited the still-married couple to see how their relationship has evolved, and their thoughts on the major shifts in public opinion over gay marriage since their own nuptials.

Voecks: I’m stunned at the rapidity of the change. Not just statewide, but nationally and internationally. After working for gay rights since the ’70s when decades would go by with little or no movement, we now see changes within months.

Waters: I’m delighted to see the change. I also know with absolute certainty that the current level of support is not the end point but merely a milestone along the path toward near universal support.

And how’s the happy couple progressing?

Voecks: I can honestly say, better than ever. No exaggeration. Every day is better, and we are really the envy of both gay and straight couples who say they have never seen such a happy relationship.

Waters: I’ll go along with that.

Read more over at Framework.

Photos: Gary Friedman / Los Angeles Times

As soon as they lift that stay, marriages are on. The wedding bells will ring.

Scenes of celebration following today’s rulings on Prop. 8, DOMA

The Supreme Court handed two major victories to the gay marriage movement this morning, ruling a key part of the Defense of Marriage Act unconstitutional, and effectively ending Proposition 8 in California.

You can read the full opinions of the court here, or just keep looking at the joy over the rulings captured above.

Photos: Charles Dharapak, Eric Risberg / Associated Press, Win McNamee, Justin Sullivan, Mark Wilson / Getty Images, Jim Lo Scalzo / EPA, Irfan Khan / Los Angeles Times

Supreme Court strikes down Defense of Marriage Act

In a landmark victory for gay rights activists, the Supreme Court has ruled DOMA unconstitutional in a 5-4 decision. The 1996 law denied all benefits and federal recognition of same-sex couples, sparking a lengthy legal battle that has culminated in today’s ruling. You can read the full opinion of the court here

The court’s second ruling on gay marriage today, regarding California’s Proposition 8 ban, has yet to be announced, but we’ll update this post when it arrives. Or, you can head over to Politics Now for live updates on the fallout from the court’s rulings today.

UPDATE:

The court followed its ruling on DOMA with a 5-4 ruling punting Prop. 8 back to California, and opening the door for same-sex marriages. But the majority’s decision doesn’t represent a sweeping ruling on the matter.

Instead, they ruled that supporters of Prop. 8 had no standing, and the decision does nothing to change the laws of 31 states that have banned same-sex marriage.

Read the full opinion of the court here.

Photos: Charles Dharapak, J. Scott Applewhite / Associated Press, Win McNamee / Getty Images, Pete Marovich / MCT

pewresearch:

LGBT in Changing Times: The Data
Our new comprehensive report contains a data dump of numbers and analysis on LGBT issues and opinion, including:
Global views of homosexuality
U.S. public opinion towards gay marriage and homosexuality
Interactive map of state policies
Slideshow: Changing attitudes over time
Voices: Comments from survey respondents
15 Countries that permit gay marriage
Infographic (above)
More to come next week.

Pew’s new study highlights just how much public attitudes have shifted on gay marriage in just a few years, with a broad majority of Americans now seeing its legalization as “inevitable.”
Read more over at Politics Now.

pewresearch:

LGBT in Changing Times: The Data

Our new comprehensive report contains a data dump of numbers and analysis on LGBT issues and opinion, including:

More to come next week.

Pew’s new study highlights just how much public attitudes have shifted on gay marriage in just a few years, with a broad majority of Americans now seeing its legalization as “inevitable.”

Read more over at Politics Now.

test reblogged from pewresearch

The Supreme Court appears timid about expanding same-sex marriage, writes editorial cartoonist and commentator David Horsey.Read the full story here. 

The Supreme Court appears timid about expanding same-sex marriage, writes editorial cartoonist and commentator David Horsey.

Read the full story here

Gay marriage’s second round at the Supreme Court

Following yesterday’s debate on the future of California’s Proposition 8 banning same-sex marriage in the state, the Supreme Court began its hearing this morning on the Defense of Marriage Act.

Since its inception in 1996, DOMA has drawn controversy, but this is the first time that the mandate, which has fallen out of favor with the Obama administration, has been brought to the Supreme Court.

Though crowds in front of the courtroom are smaller than yesterday’s Prop. 8 supporters and opponents

Read more on the proceedings on Politics Now.

Photos: Karen Bleier, Mark Wilson, Jewel Samad / AFP/Getty Images