"Chop suey, that’s a very old dish. But this guy, he’s older"

Paul’s Kitchen has been parked in the so-called “City Market Chinatown” since 1946, enduring the ebb and flow of customers, competition and eventually, an exodus of interest in favor of the “New Chinatown” to the North.

And though the dinner crowds have dwindled, lunch still brings a wave of loyal diners looking for Paul’s “Depression-era Chinese food,” the hearty kind that sticks to your ribs.

And through it all, Paul’s adamantly endures change by not changing at all:

For 23 years, manager Charlie Ng has run the restaurant on downtown’s San Pedro Street as his uncle Paul directed, adhering to a business strategy that has over the years been elevated to maxim: Keep everything the same.

It’s even woven into the restaurant’s Chinese name, bao ju — a common naming format for restaurants of the time period that translates literally as “treasure memory.”

Read more in our latest Column One feature from reporter Frank Shyong.

Photos: Francine Orr / Los Angeles Times

Happy National Nacho Day!

Now just watch in awe as this terrifying, delicious mound of chips, cheese and so much more is constructed by the L.A. Times Test Kitchen.

Keep calm, Sriracha production will carry on

A Los Angeles County Judge earlier today rejected a call for the Irwindale Sriracha factory to be shut down due to complaints about fumes it produces, though a final hearing on the matter has been set for Nov. 22.

So you can probably stop stockpiling your bottles of the beloved hot sauce at least until then.

Stay updated on the sauce status over at L.A. Now.

Photos: Nick Ut / Associated Press, Greg Anderson, San Gabriel Valley Tribune

kateoplis:

Lou Lou P’s

Terrifyingly delicious.

test reblogged from kateoplis

If it doesn’t smell, we can’t sell.

Nation’s precious Sriracha supply at risk

Hot sauce fans be warned. The Sriracha factory in Irwindale could be shut down after several complaints from nearby residents that the smell of the factory is so strong that it is causing throat pain, burning eyes and headaches.

Keep track of the latest over at L.A. Now, and follow reporter Frank Shyong, who’s hot on the trail of the alleged Sriracha dangers.

Photos: Gina Ferazzi / Los Angeles Times

buzzfeed:

This is what happens when you try to feed kids healthy candy.

Worse than ending up trick-or-treating at the house of the dentist who hands out toothbrushes.

test reblogged from buzzfeed

The growing swarm of cockroach farms in China

You may think of them as a nasty pest, but in China, raising cockroaches has become an increasingly popular industry. Our own Barbara Demick talked to some of the nation’s most successful roach ranchers to find out what’s behind the bug industry boom.

So where’s the demand for roaches?

At least five pharmaceutical companies are using cockroaches for traditional Chinese medicine. Research is underway in China (and South Korea) on the use of pulverized cockroaches for treating baldness, AIDS and cancer and as a vitamin supplement.

South Korea’s Jeonnam Province Agricultural Research Institute and China’s Dali University College of Pharmacy have published papers on the anti-carcinogenic properties of the cockroach.

Plus, there’s the fact that cockroaches are technically edible:

Many farmers are hoping to boost demand by promoting cockroaches in fish and animal feed and as a delicacy for humans.

Chinese aren’t quite as squeamish as most Westerners about insects — after all, people here still keep crickets as pets.

Read the full story in a buggy Column One feature.

Photos: Wang Xuhua / For the Times

kcrw:

LA might still be an agricultural empire. A new interactive map shows the urban gardens (and farms) near you!
http://bit.ly/1dk0KIy http://on.fb.me/18Y4HgR

Very neat!

kcrw:

LA might still be an agricultural empire. A new interactive map shows the urban gardens (and farms) near you!

http://bit.ly/1dk0KIy http://on.fb.me/18Y4HgR

Very neat!

test reblogged from kcrw

farlizzle:

10 Best Breakfast Burritos in Los Angeles
There’s something very satisfying about a warm, hearty meal to start your day off right, especially if you ended your evening on a particularly boozy note. In Los Angeles, that can often mean one thing: breakfast burritos.
Breakfast burritos are a divisive topic. Some folks can’t even agree on the essential ingredients for a breakfast burrito — egg, tortilla, maybe breakfast meat, maybe potato, maybe cheese — let alone where to find the finest version. Luckily, Angelenos are spoiled for choice, so a decent breakfast burrito of some kind is never far away.
But what about the great breakfast burritos? The one you see when your eyelids close for the night; the one your mouth waters for when you wake up. Here are ten of the best — from Atwater Village to Reseda — that will make you a true believer in the greasy, eggy, deliciously mystical ways of breakfast burritos.
read more…
[LA Weekly | farley elliott]

Start your day right, L.A.

farlizzle:

10 Best Breakfast Burritos in Los Angeles

There’s something very satisfying about a warm, hearty meal to start your day off right, especially if you ended your evening on a particularly boozy note. In Los Angeles, that can often mean one thing: breakfast burritos.

Breakfast burritos are a divisive topic. Some folks can’t even agree on the essential ingredients for a breakfast burrito — egg, tortilla, maybe breakfast meat, maybe potato, maybe cheese — let alone where to find the finest version. Luckily, Angelenos are spoiled for choice, so a decent breakfast burrito of some kind is never far away.

But what about the great breakfast burritos? The one you see when your eyelids close for the night; the one your mouth waters for when you wake up. Here are ten of the best — from Atwater Village to Reseda — that will make you a true believer in the greasy, eggy, deliciously mystical ways of breakfast burritos.

read more…

[LA Weekly | farley elliott]

Start your day right, L.A.

test reblogged from tumblangeles

It’s Friday. It’s National Ice Cream Sandwich Day. Treat yourself.

As put by food blogger Tessa Arias, author of “Cookies & Cream: Hundreds of Ways to Make the Perfect Ice Cream Sandwich” in an interview with our own Rene Lynch:

"It’s kind of like the ultimate indulgence. It reminds you of childhood memories and summertime.

I think that a lot of people have memories of being outdoors and hearing that noise of the ice cream truck coming around. It’s such a simple pleasure.”

Read more about the frozen treat over at the Daily Dish, if you haven’t already run out to nab one for yourself.

Photos: Ricardo DeAratanha, Kirk McKoy / Los Angeles Times, Mariam / FlickrJohn / Flickr

L.A. Times Past: Cooking like it's 1905: Spanish stuffed onions

latimespast:

When L.A. Times assignment editor Kimi Yoshino tweeted recently that reporter Ari Bloomekatz had procured for her a copy of a 1905 cookbook the Los Angeles Times published, I had to see it.

image

As we pored over the pages, we thought, “How fun would it be to make some of these old recipes?”

test reblogged from latimespast

Meet Martin Riese, water sommelier 
You read that correctly. L.A.’s Patina Group of Restaurants has its own water expert, who takes his clear beverages as seriously as wine enthusiasts take their own drink of choice.
For just a hint of how straight-faced Riese is about something that, admittedly, seems a bit ridiculous:

He pours a glass of Fiji water and swirls it like a glass of wine. He then takes a sip, puckers his lips and chews on the water for a bit before swallowing. He then pours a glass of Voss water and follows the same tasting procedure. 
"Fiji is more in the smooth area and very light when I’m tasting it," said Riese. "Voss has more of a bitter taste to it. Right away I’m getting it on my palate when I drink the Voss. But Fiji, I don’t have that."  

And don’t even try to offer him standard-issue H2O:

"Smell this tap water. It smells like chlorine," said Riese with a look of disgust. "As a restaurant person here in L.A., I can say I would never drink that water. When you have good food, good wine and good spirits, you don’t want to contaminate that with this water."

Read more, including why a single bottle of water can cost $20, over at the Daily Dish.
Photo: Jenn Harris / Los Angeles Times

Meet Martin Riese, water sommelier

You read that correctly. L.A.’s Patina Group of Restaurants has its own water expert, who takes his clear beverages as seriously as wine enthusiasts take their own drink of choice.

For just a hint of how straight-faced Riese is about something that, admittedly, seems a bit ridiculous:

He pours a glass of Fiji water and swirls it like a glass of wine. He then takes a sip, puckers his lips and chews on the water for a bit before swallowing. He then pours a glass of Voss water and follows the same tasting procedure. 

"Fiji is more in the smooth area and very light when I’m tasting it," said Riese. "Voss has more of a bitter taste to it. Right away I’m getting it on my palate when I drink the Voss. But Fiji, I don’t have that."  

And don’t even try to offer him standard-issue H2O:

"Smell this tap water. It smells like chlorine," said Riese with a look of disgust. "As a restaurant person here in L.A., I can say I would never drink that water. When you have good food, good wine and good spirits, you don’t want to contaminate that with this water."

Read more, including why a single bottle of water can cost $20, over at the Daily Dish.

Photo: Jenn Harris / Los Angeles Times

Is Michelle Obama’s health campaign doing all it can?
First lady Obama has long been an advocate for healthy food and exercise during her stint in the White House, headlining the “Let’s Move” campaign and hosting frequent events in her garden to highlight the benefits of quality food.
But when it comes to the marketing of sugary treats and syrupy sodas to children, did she do enough to try and save failed federal guidelines she had previously praised?
From Kathleen Hennessey and Matea Gold’s report:

…when food and media companies — including many that supported her anti-obesity campaign — mounted a fierce lobbying battle against the guidelines in 2011, the first lady went silent.
It wasn’t until earlier this year, after the guidelines had been blocked, that Obama resumed her call for more responsible food marketing.

And despite her victories in the fight against obesity, Obama is not without her critics:

…some who see themselves as Obama’s allies in the fight against obesity believe her desire to create partnerships with industry kept her quiet when her voice would have counted most. Fourteen companies that back Obama’s anti-obesity campaign helped kill the voluntary advertising guidelines, lobbying reports and other records show.
"The White House got cold feet," said Sen. Tom Harkin (D-Iowa), who had championed the guidelines. "It sort of undermines everything that the first lady was doing."

Read the full story here.
Photo: Olivier Douliery / Abaca Press/MCT

Is Michelle Obama’s health campaign doing all it can?

First lady Obama has long been an advocate for healthy food and exercise during her stint in the White House, headlining the “Let’s Move” campaign and hosting frequent events in her garden to highlight the benefits of quality food.

But when it comes to the marketing of sugary treats and syrupy sodas to children, did she do enough to try and save failed federal guidelines she had previously praised?

From Kathleen Hennessey and Matea Gold’s report:

…when food and media companies — including many that supported her anti-obesity campaign — mounted a fierce lobbying battle against the guidelines in 2011, the first lady went silent.

It wasn’t until earlier this year, after the guidelines had been blocked, that Obama resumed her call for more responsible food marketing.

And despite her victories in the fight against obesity, Obama is not without her critics:

…some who see themselves as Obama’s allies in the fight against obesity believe her desire to create partnerships with industry kept her quiet when her voice would have counted most. Fourteen companies that back Obama’s anti-obesity campaign helped kill the voluntary advertising guidelines, lobbying reports and other records show.

"The White House got cold feet," said Sen. Tom Harkin (D-Iowa), who had championed the guidelines. "It sort of undermines everything that the first lady was doing."

Read the full story here.

Photo: Olivier Douliery / Abaca Press/MCT

I want to state for the record, I do like ice cream and I enjoy ice cream trucks.