People getting gas in Berkeley might soon be seeing these warning labels as they fill up at the pump, informing them that California has concluded that CO2 emissions contribute to global warming. The idea was modeled on warnings on cigarette packaging.
Photo courtesy of 350 Bay Area. 

People getting gas in Berkeley might soon be seeing these warning labels as they fill up at the pump, informing them that California has concluded that CO2 emissions contribute to global warming. The idea was modeled on warnings on cigarette packaging.

Photo courtesy of 350 Bay Area. 

The California Fish and Game Commission has voted to extend endangered species protections in the state to gray wolves. 
No wolves are currently known to be in the state — the wolf in the photo above, called OR7, was the most recent wolf documented here, and he was the first one since the 1920s — but biologists say their return is inevitable.
Speaking of OR7, who has returned to his home state of Oregon: Wildlife officials there have spotted two pups they believe to be his offspring.
Photo: OR7 in Oregon. Credit: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

The California Fish and Game Commission has voted to extend endangered species protections in the state to gray wolves. 

No wolves are currently known to be in the state — the wolf in the photo above, called OR7, was the most recent wolf documented here, and he was the first one since the 1920s — but biologists say their return is inevitable.

Speaking of OR7, who has returned to his home state of Oregon: Wildlife officials there have spotted two pups they believe to be his offspring.

Photo: OR7 in Oregon. Credit: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Nobody on this planet is going to be untouched by the impacts of climate change.
Air pollution is linked to 1 in 8 deaths worldwide, according to a new report from the World Health Organization. 
Photo: Heavily polluted air seen in the northern Chinese city of Harbin in October 2013. Credit: Associated Press

Air pollution is linked to 1 in 8 deaths worldwide, according to a new report from the World Health Organization. 

Photo: Heavily polluted air seen in the northern Chinese city of Harbin in October 2013. Credit: Associated Press

Happy International Polar Bear Day!

Science reporter Deborah Netburn talked to the chief scientist for Polar Bears International, the conservation group that founded International Polar Bear Day, about ways people can help polar bears. Number one on the group’s list: turn your thermostat down a few degrees.

Video: A polar bear cub experiences snow for the first time. Credit: Toronto Zoo

California’s calamitous drought drags on

It’s dry in California - historically dry. Water is in short supply, the air is noticeably without moisture, farms are parched and just look at the photo above of the state’s dwindling snow cover. It pretty much speaks for itself.

Meanwhile, various interests are turning to the political realm to try and ensure they get theirs when it comes to H2O.

And the drought has been particularly harsh on agriculture:

Ranchers have begun liquidating herds. Growers are considering tearing out thirsty tree crops such as nut orchards and citrus groves. And tens of thousands of additional acres of prime California soil could go unplanted if farmers don’t get enough water to irrigate them.

Read more on the drought’s effect on California here.

Photos: David McNew / Getty Images, Frederic J. Brown / Associated Press, NOAA, Randall Benton / Los Angeles Times

The dusty decimation of California’s drought

California’s longstanding drought has escalated in recent months, with 62.7% of the state now in what the Department of Agriculture deems “extreme” conditions.

But in few places is it as easily visualized as in the area surrounding the vanishing Cachuma Lake, which has become one of the most prominent victims of the lack of rain.

In years past, the spot where Bozarth was standing was under 30, 40, even 50 feet of water. It wasn’t all that long ago that Cachuma “spilled” — filled to the brim, to the point where millions of gallons of clean, fresh water was released through the dam’s gates and cast into the sea, a display of surplus that is laughable today.

That was only three years ago. Now, said Tom Fayram, Santa Barbara County’s deputy public works director, “it’s just empty.”

Read reporter Scott Gold’s full story here.

Photos: Brian van der Brug, Lorena Iñiguez Elebee / Los Angeles Times

Los Angeles: Say goodbye to plastic bags
Starting with the new year, plastic bags will be banned from major grocery markets, with smaller stores to be forced to give up the bags starting in July. So L.A. residents be warned: Tomorrow is your last chance to have your groceries bagged in plastic in compliance with the law.
Unless, of course, your grocer of choice just decides to hand you a plastic bag anyway.
Read more on the upcoming ban right here.
Photo: Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times

Los Angeles: Say goodbye to plastic bags

Starting with the new year, plastic bags will be banned from major grocery markets, with smaller stores to be forced to give up the bags starting in July. So L.A. residents be warned: Tomorrow is your last chance to have your groceries bagged in plastic in compliance with the law.

Unless, of course, your grocer of choice just decides to hand you a plastic bag anyway.

Read more on the upcoming ban right here.

Photo: Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times

Green energy could crash the national power grid
Not because of any sort of explosive danger, but because the U.S. power grid is built for the previous century’s sources of energy. The antiquated grid, already a persistent cause for concern for officials, simply may not be prepared for large-scale adoption of alternative sources of power:

Green energy is the least predictable kind. Nobody can say for certain when the wind will blow or the sun will shine. A field of solar panels might be cranking out huge amounts of energy one minute and a tiny amount the next if a thick cloud arrives. In many cases, renewable resources exist where transmission lines don’t.

Read reporter Evan Halper’s full story on the rush to modernize a creaky grid here.
Photo: Dennis Schroeder / National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Green energy could crash the national power grid

Not because of any sort of explosive danger, but because the U.S. power grid is built for the previous century’s sources of energy. The antiquated grid, already a persistent cause for concern for officials, simply may not be prepared for large-scale adoption of alternative sources of power:

Green energy is the least predictable kind. Nobody can say for certain when the wind will blow or the sun will shine. A field of solar panels might be cranking out huge amounts of energy one minute and a tiny amount the next if a thick cloud arrives. In many cases, renewable resources exist where transmission lines don’t.

Read reporter Evan Halper’s full story on the rush to modernize a creaky grid here.

Photo: Dennis Schroeder / National Renewable Energy Laboratory

motherjones:

Wow: Typhoon Haiyan overlaid on a map of the United States 
via Red Cross

Some perspective on the "national calamity" that has struck the Philippines, with a death of at least 10,000 people expected by officials. You can donate to help the victims of the catastrophic storm via the Red Cross here.
CORRECTION: Before this is shared any further, the New Republic’s Nate Cohn has corrected the Red Cross’ image, with some help from Bran Dougherty-Johnson. In the center are the Philippines, with Typhoon Haiyan in the lower right.

motherjones:

Wow: Typhoon Haiyan overlaid on a map of the United States 

via Red Cross

Some perspective on the "national calamity" that has struck the Philippines, with a death of at least 10,000 people expected by officials. You can donate to help the victims of the catastrophic storm via the Red Cross here.

CORRECTION: Before this is shared any further, the New Republic’s Nate Cohn has corrected the Red Cross’ image, with some help from Bran Dougherty-Johnson. In the center are the Philippines, with Typhoon Haiyan in the lower right.

test reblogged from theatlantic

Los Angeles Aqueduct bomber tells his side of the story

One of the men behind the series of aqueduct bombings in 1976, which struck three locations along the vital L.A. aqueduct, has opened up for the first time and recently spoke to reporter Louis Sahagun.

Mark Berry, who was just 17 at the time of the bombings, narrated the events leading up to the detonations:

Berry and his friend, Robert Howe, were caught up in the anger that then hung over the Owens Valley. The environmental damage caused by the Los Angeles Aqueduct, built in the early 1900s to divert much of the water from the region to the growing metropolis 200 miles away, was worsening and Owens Valley residents were exasperated.

"Things got out of hand," Berry recalled.

The friends stole two cases of dynamite and headed to the aqueduct.

And the rest is history. Read through all of the revelations in our latest Column One feature, and follow along with other standout reports via LAT Great Reads.

Photos: Brian van der Brug / Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles Times Archives

Think L.A. has smog problems? Check out China’s ‘Airpocalypse’

Los Angeles certainly has a long history of air pollution problems, but its hard to imagine the scope of the current pollution currently clouding northern Chinese skies.

Fueled by coal plants and burning fields, the thick haze has closed schools, clogged traffic and is prompted doctors to warn of widespread respiratory problems.

In Harbin, a city of 12 million world-famous for its wintertime ice festival, the smog was so thick that visibility was reduced to 20 yards. Municipal bus drivers lost their way in the haze. In one case, a morning rush hour bus that left at 5:30 wandered around for three hours before the driver found the route.

Read more over at World Now.

Photos: STR / AFP, NASA

Simply put, I do my best to keep errors of fact off the letters page; when one does run, a correction is published. Saying “there’s no sign humans have caused climate change” is not stating an opinion, it’s asserting a factual inaccuracy.
pbsthisdayinhistory:

October 1, 1890: Yosemite Established as National Park
On this day in 1890, President Benjamin Harrison signed a bill into law creating Yosemite National Park. The mountainous region spanning 1,169 square miles of public land in the California Sierra Nevada preserves wilderness, wildlife, and public trust.
Tour all of America’s national parks by visiting Ken Burns’s The National Parks: America’s Best Idea collections.
Photo: Yosemite National Park, California. Photographer: William Henry Jackson, Copyright 1898 (Library of Congress). 

Just don’t try to visit today, since Yosemite is one of the many National Parks closed during the government shutdown.

pbsthisdayinhistory:

October 1, 1890: Yosemite Established as National Park

On this day in 1890, President Benjamin Harrison signed a bill into law creating Yosemite National Park. The mountainous region spanning 1,169 square miles of public land in the California Sierra Nevada preserves wilderness, wildlife, and public trust.

Tour all of America’s national parks by visiting Ken Burns’s The National Parks: America’s Best Idea collections.

Photo: Yosemite National Park, California. Photographer: William Henry Jackson, Copyright 1898 (Library of Congress). 

Just don’t try to visit today, since Yosemite is one of the many National Parks closed during the government shutdown.

test reblogged from pbsthisdayinhistory

Rim fire’s legacy burnt into landscape for decades to come

The Rim fire, which is still burning as its secured its legacy as California’s third-largest wildfire in history, so far has burned across nearly 402 square miles. Though the worst of the blaze is over, and officials expect it to be fully extinguished by October, the region’s recovery has barely begun:

Burned chaparral and oak will quickly resprout. But where large patches of trees were killed, ecologists say it could take 30 to 50 years for the forest to reestablish itself in the shrub fields that are the first to grow. If there are more fires in the meantime, the land could permanently convert to chaparral.

Read more of Bettina Boxall’s report here.

Photos: NASA / AFP/Getty Images, Lawrence K. Ho / Los Angeles Times