Officials say an earthquake early-warning system provided an alert 10 seconds before the 6.0 quake was felt in the Bay Area yesterday.

Officials say an earthquake early-warning system provided an alert 10 seconds before the 6.0 quake was felt in the Bay Area yesterday.

Friday’s magnitude 5.1 earthquake centered in La Habra was felt by an estimated 17 million people, and 16,000 of them used the U.S. Geological Survey’s Did You Feel It? online reporting system to provide seismologists with data on their experiences.

The Did You Feel It? system was created in 1999; before that, the USGS sent snail-mail questionnaires to people who lived in ZIP codes that had been affected by earthquakes. People filled out and returned the questionnaires, and the information they gave had to be compiled in a process that took months. Thanks, Internet: Now scientists have quick access to usable, sortable data from the public that helps establish the intensity of an earthquake and how far from its epicenter it was felt.

Here’s our full coverage of the earthquake and its aftershocks.

Photo: Cesar Zamora, night manager at the 99 Cents Only store on Imperial Highway, looks over aisles of fallen goods on March 28. Credit: Robert Gauthier / Los Angeles Times. More photos.

Friday’s magnitude 5.1 earthquake centered in La Habra was felt by an estimated 17 million people, and 16,000 of them used the U.S. Geological Survey’s Did You Feel It? online reporting system to provide seismologists with data on their experiences.

The Did You Feel It? system was created in 1999; before that, the USGS sent snail-mail questionnaires to people who lived in ZIP codes that had been affected by earthquakes. People filled out and returned the questionnaires, and the information they gave had to be compiled in a process that took months. Thanks, Internet: Now scientists have quick access to usable, sortable data from the public that helps establish the intensity of an earthquake and how far from its epicenter it was felt.

Here’s our full coverage of the earthquake and its aftershocks.

Photo: Cesar Zamora, night manager at the 99 Cents Only store on Imperial Highway, looks over aisles of fallen goods on March 28. Credit: Robert Gauthier / Los Angeles Times. More photos.

Since 1973, more than 100 earthquakes with a magnitude of 4 or higher have struck in the greater Los Angeles area. Our interactive map allows you to see the location, magnitude and date of each quake.

Friday’s 5.1 earthquake was a potent reminder of a fault that is less known to most Californians than the San Andreas, but that seismologists believe can produce a catastrophic disaster. That fault, the Puente Hills fault, is so dangerous because of its location, reporter Rong-Gong Lin II explains. Here’s our full coverage of Southern California’s recent earthquakes and an earthquake preparedness guide.

Map data: Southern California Earthquake Center

Since 1973, more than 100 earthquakes with a magnitude of 4 or higher have struck in the greater Los Angeles area. Our interactive map allows you to see the location, magnitude and date of each quake.

Friday’s 5.1 earthquake was a potent reminder of a fault that is less known to most Californians than the San Andreas, but that seismologists believe can produce a catastrophic disaster. That fault, the Puente Hills fault, is so dangerous because of its location, reporter Rong-Gong Lin II explains. Here’s our full coverage of Southern California’s recent earthquakes and an earthquake preparedness guide.

Map data: Southern California Earthquake Center

latimespast:

Twenty years ago this morning, Southern California awoke to the shaking of the Northridge earthquake. 
Share your memories here: Disaster before dawn — readers remember the Northridge earthquake
Read about what has changed in 20 years: Earthquake risks have evolved since Northridge
Prepare yourself and your family for the Big One: You live in earthquake country; get ready before the next one hits
The Times won a Pulitzer prize for its coverage 20 years ago. Reread some of our journalism from 1994: Northridge earthquake, 20 years later
And, in the strangest of coincidences, a 2.6 earthquake shook Universal City this morning: Quake hits on 20th anniversary of Northridge
— Matt Ballinger
Photo: Jan. 20, 1994: The Interstate 5 freeway near Newhall after damage from the Northridge earthquake. Credit: Al Seib / Los Angeles Times

latimespast:

Twenty years ago this morning, Southern California awoke to the shaking of the Northridge earthquake. 

Share your memories here: Disaster before dawn — readers remember the Northridge earthquake

Read about what has changed in 20 years: Earthquake risks have evolved since Northridge

Prepare yourself and your family for the Big One: You live in earthquake country; get ready before the next one hits

The Times won a Pulitzer prize for its coverage 20 years ago. Reread some of our journalism from 1994: Northridge earthquake, 20 years later

And, in the strangest of coincidences, a 2.6 earthquake shook Universal City this morning: Quake hits on 20th anniversary of Northridge

Matt Ballinger

Photo: Jan. 20, 1994: The Interstate 5 freeway near Newhall after damage from the Northridge earthquake. Credit: Al Seib / Los Angeles Times

test reblogged from latimespast

Remembering the Northridge earthquake

Twenty years ago, a massive earthquake struck Los Angeles, killing an estimated 60 people and leaving billions of dollars in damages in its wake.

We’re looking to memorialize the quake on its Jan. 17 anniversary, so if you have stories from that tragic day, head over to L.A. Now and let your voice be heard.

Photos: Los Angeles Times archive

Los Angeles’ multitude of buildings at risk during an earthquake

A number of older buildings in Los Angeles, despite the dangers being well-known to officials and builders alike, don’t meet current earthquake safety standards.

By the most conservative estimate, as many as 50 of these buildings in the city alone would be destroyed, exposing thousands to injury or death.

A cross-section of the city lives and works in them: seamstresses in downtown factories, white-collar workers in Ventura Boulevard high-rises and condo dwellers on Millionaires’ Mile in Westwood.

Despite their sturdy appearance, many older concrete buildings are vulnerable to the sideways movement of a major earthquake because they don’t have enough steel reinforcing bars to hold columns in place.

Head over to the full analysis of the at-risk structures, or explore a map of the buildings that could pose a danger.

Photos: Los Angeles Times Archives

When a major earthquake strikes, seconds count. A proposed $80-million system similar to one in Japan would use sensors in the ground to alert residents before an earthquake hits and would be the first such network in the U.S.

When a major earthquake strikes, seconds count. A proposed $80-million system similar to one in Japan would use sensors in the ground to alert residents before an earthquake hits and would be the first such network in the U.S.

March 11 will mark the first anniversary of the massive tsunami that pummeled Japan, claiming more than 20,000 lives. The Times’ photo desk has made an amazing gallery of interactive before-and-after sliders.

Photos credit: AFP/Getty Images

Jan. 17, 1994: The collapse of the second and third stories onto the first story at Northridge Meadows apartments in the Northridge quake killed 16 people and crushed cars.
View 130 photos for The Times’ 130th birthday on Framework.
Photo credit:	Rolando Otero / Los Angeles Times

Jan. 17, 1994: The collapse of the second and third stories onto the first story at Northridge Meadows apartments in the Northridge quake killed 16 people and crushed cars.

View 130 photos for The Times’ 130th birthday on Framework.

Photo credit: Rolando Otero / Los Angeles Times

You guys feel that?

latimes:

latimes:

A baby one.

A 4.2 in Newhall, Calif.

Looks like the quake was upgraded to a 4.3.

test reblogged from latimes

abc7:

Did you feel that Los Angeles?
A 4.2 earthquake hit the Newhall area in the San Fernando Valley on Thursday. The quake was centered four miles east southeast of Newhall at 1:47 p.m. PT.

abc7:

Did you feel that Los Angeles?

A 4.2 earthquake hit the Newhall area in the San Fernando Valley on Thursday. The quake was centered four miles east southeast of Newhall at 1:47 p.m. PT.

test reblogged from abc7

A quake, an aftershock, another quake: Read more on L.A. Now. 
Map: Location of 4.2.-magnitude earthquake in black brackets. Other small quakes appear in yellow. Source: U.S. Geological Survey

A quake, an aftershock, another quake: Read more on L.A. Now.

Map: Location of 4.2.-magnitude earthquake in black brackets. Other small quakes appear in yellow. Source: U.S. Geological Survey

You guys feel that?

latimes:

A baby one.

A 4.2 in Newhall, Calif.

test reblogged from latimes