Bad news for Sriracha nation

It’s been a rough day for the Sriracha faithful. A Los Angeles County judge has decided a plant producing the amazing hot sauce in Irwindale should be partially shut down after residents complained about the health effects of fumes created during production.

Production of this year’s batch of sauce has been completed, so don’t go rushing out to the stores and stocking up for the Srirachalypse. But as for next year, well, decisions about future production are now in the hands of air quality experts.

Read more over at L.A. Now.

Photos: Nick Ut / Associated Press

Introducing the Los Angeles Times Holiday Cookbook

And by cookbook, we really mean an awesome site that hosts more than 600 holiday recipes perfect for everything between a light salad and a food coma-inducing Thanksgiving feast.

So hop on over and explore the entire cookbook here, just be warned that you’ll likely be hungry once you’re done.

Photos: Bob Chamberlin, Kirk McKoy, Mel Melcon / Los Angeles Times

"Chop suey, that’s a very old dish. But this guy, he’s older"

Paul’s Kitchen has been parked in the so-called “City Market Chinatown” since 1946, enduring the ebb and flow of customers, competition and eventually, an exodus of interest in favor of the “New Chinatown” to the North.

And though the dinner crowds have dwindled, lunch still brings a wave of loyal diners looking for Paul’s “Depression-era Chinese food,” the hearty kind that sticks to your ribs.

And through it all, Paul’s adamantly endures change by not changing at all:

For 23 years, manager Charlie Ng has run the restaurant on downtown’s San Pedro Street as his uncle Paul directed, adhering to a business strategy that has over the years been elevated to maxim: Keep everything the same.

It’s even woven into the restaurant’s Chinese name, bao ju — a common naming format for restaurants of the time period that translates literally as “treasure memory.”

Read more in our latest Column One feature from reporter Frank Shyong.

Photos: Francine Orr / Los Angeles Times

Happy National Nacho Day!

Now just watch in awe as this terrifying, delicious mound of chips, cheese and so much more is constructed by the L.A. Times Test Kitchen.

Keep calm, Sriracha production will carry on

A Los Angeles County Judge earlier today rejected a call for the Irwindale Sriracha factory to be shut down due to complaints about fumes it produces, though a final hearing on the matter has been set for Nov. 22.

So you can probably stop stockpiling your bottles of the beloved hot sauce at least until then.

Stay updated on the sauce status over at L.A. Now.

Photos: Nick Ut / Associated Press, Greg Anderson, San Gabriel Valley Tribune

If it doesn’t smell, we can’t sell.

Nation’s precious Sriracha supply at risk

Hot sauce fans be warned. The Sriracha factory in Irwindale could be shut down after several complaints from nearby residents that the smell of the factory is so strong that it is causing throat pain, burning eyes and headaches.

Keep track of the latest over at L.A. Now, and follow reporter Frank Shyong, who’s hot on the trail of the alleged Sriracha dangers.

Photos: Gina Ferazzi / Los Angeles Times

The growing swarm of cockroach farms in China

You may think of them as a nasty pest, but in China, raising cockroaches has become an increasingly popular industry. Our own Barbara Demick talked to some of the nation’s most successful roach ranchers to find out what’s behind the bug industry boom.

So where’s the demand for roaches?

At least five pharmaceutical companies are using cockroaches for traditional Chinese medicine. Research is underway in China (and South Korea) on the use of pulverized cockroaches for treating baldness, AIDS and cancer and as a vitamin supplement.

South Korea’s Jeonnam Province Agricultural Research Institute and China’s Dali University College of Pharmacy have published papers on the anti-carcinogenic properties of the cockroach.

Plus, there’s the fact that cockroaches are technically edible:

Many farmers are hoping to boost demand by promoting cockroaches in fish and animal feed and as a delicacy for humans.

Chinese aren’t quite as squeamish as most Westerners about insects — after all, people here still keep crickets as pets.

Read the full story in a buggy Column One feature.

Photos: Wang Xuhua / For the Times

pbs-food:

Julia and the Swordfish
Happy Birthday Julia!

pbs-food:

Julia and the Swordfish

Happy Birthday Julia!

test reblogged from pbs-food

L.A. Times Past: Cooking like it's 1905: Spanish stuffed onions

latimespast:

When L.A. Times assignment editor Kimi Yoshino tweeted recently that reporter Ari Bloomekatz had procured for her a copy of a 1905 cookbook the Los Angeles Times published, I had to see it.

image

As we pored over the pages, we thought, “How fun would it be to make some of these old recipes?”

test reblogged from latimespast

cheatsheet:

Is it summer yet? 

The only way to celebrate the first day of summer.

test reblogged from cheatsheet

Whether you’re a vegetarian or still a fan of meat, this video will end up warming your heart. (With a hat tip to Laughing Squid.)

Jonathan Gold’s best Los Angeles restaurants revealed!

Pultizer Prize-winning critic Jonathan Gold has finally lifted the curtain on where he thinks the best places in L.A. to grab a bite to eat, a luxurious meal or just a huge upgrade to your workday lunch.

The full list is behind our paywall, but the top 20 spots are nonetheless open for everyone to take a peek.

Gold’s top pick, by the way, is Providence, a restaurant that has already been met with widespread acclaim. Though far from a bargain, the Mid-Wilshire establishment is, at least in Gold’s opinion, worth the expense.

Photos: Christina House / For The Times

How to solve world hunger with pizza
The idea of a universal food synthesizer sounds like something straight out of the Jetsons or Star Trek, but thanks to a $125,000 grant from NASA, a 3-D food printer may become a reality.
Anjan Contractor, a senior mechanical engineer at Systems and Materials Research Corporation, is already working on bringing the idea to fruition.
NASA’s interested because storing the various ingredients as a power greatly extends their shelf life for lengthy travel through space, but Contractor wants to keep all of the recipes open source, so the general public could eventually benefit as well.
So how will the pizza be made?

Pizza will be one of the first items printed because of its natural layers of ingredients. First, a layer of dough will be printed and baked at the same time using a heated plate at the bottom of the printer. A layer of tomato base will follow — made of powder, water and oil — then a protein layer will top the pizza.

Read more over at the Daily Dish.
Photo: Cheryl A. Guerrero / Glendale News Press

How to solve world hunger with pizza

The idea of a universal food synthesizer sounds like something straight out of the Jetsons or Star Trek, but thanks to a $125,000 grant from NASA, a 3-D food printer may become a reality.

Anjan Contractor, a senior mechanical engineer at Systems and Materials Research Corporation, is already working on bringing the idea to fruition.

NASA’s interested because storing the various ingredients as a power greatly extends their shelf life for lengthy travel through space, but Contractor wants to keep all of the recipes open source, so the general public could eventually benefit as well.

So how will the pizza be made?

Pizza will be one of the first items printed because of its natural layers of ingredients. First, a layer of dough will be printed and baked at the same time using a heated plate at the bottom of the printer. A layer of tomato base will follow — made of powder, water and oil — then a protein layer will top the pizza.

Read more over at the Daily Dish.

Photo: Cheryl A. Guerrero / Glendale News Press

Ready for the battle of the burgers?

Who molds the most delicious patties? Who dashes the most finely-tuned selection of seasonings on those perfectly succulent bits of meat? Find out in this year’s annual Battle of the Burgers, an all-out brawl over who can find the best combination to put between a bun!

Last year’s winners are seen above, and all of the corresponding recipes can be seen here,

So to join this elite burger echelon, submit your own recipe to the our food section’s Facebook page starting tomorrow, and find out if your homegrown recipe can top the competition.

Photos: Kirk McKoy / Los Angeles Times