Comic-Con 2014 in photos

Photos: Brian van der Brug / Los Angeles Times

Political cartoonist Steve Brodner takes an illustrated look into the news of the upcoming year.

Political cartoonist Steve Brodner takes an illustrated look into the news of the upcoming year.

Your new follow of the day: Fill the Silence.

Your new follow of the day: Fill the Silence.

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Beyonce as Wonder Woman? With her Super Bowl performance still fresh in our minds and our jaws still dropped, the idea isn’t as far-fetched as it initially sounds. As Beyonce told the Times way back in 2008:

“I want to do a superhero movie and what would be better than Wonder Woman? It would be great. And it would be a very bold choice. A black Wonder Woman would be a powerful thing. It’s time for that, right?”

Read more via Hero Complex, or just you know, check out more Beyonce.

Beyonce as Wonder Woman? With her Super Bowl performance still fresh in our minds and our jaws still dropped, the idea isn’t as far-fetched as it initially sounds. As Beyonce told the Times way back in 2008:

“I want to do a superhero movie and what would be better than Wonder Woman? It would be great. And it would be a very bold choice. A black Wonder Woman would be a powerful thing. It’s time for that, right?”

Read more via Hero Complex, or just you know, check out more Beyonce.

Zombie apocalypse now? For $70 fantasy fanboys and girls can offer themselves up as walker bait at Walking Dead Escape: San Diego next month at Petco Park during Comic-Con International. 
The course, designed by Ruckus Athletics and creatively guided by “Walking Dead” creator Robert Kirkman, will feature interactive details true to the bestselling comic series, which will be celebrating the release of its 100th issue.

“We wanted fans to experience — as closely as possible — the end of the world,” said Kirkman, who will join the mad scramble of biters and runners. “It’s going to be a fun, messy time.”

The Hero Complex blog has more details.
Photo “Walking Dead” creator Robert Kirkman. Credit: Scott Garfield / AMC.

Zombie apocalypse now? For $70 fantasy fanboys and girls can offer themselves up as walker bait at Walking Dead Escape: San Diego next month at Petco Park during Comic-Con International

The course, designed by Ruckus Athletics and creatively guided by “Walking Dead” creator Robert Kirkman, will feature interactive details true to the bestselling comic series, which will be celebrating the release of its 100th issue.

“We wanted fans to experience — as closely as possible — the end of the world,” said Kirkman, who will join the mad scramble of biters and runners. “It’s going to be a fun, messy time.”

The Hero Complex blog has more details.

Photo “Walking Dead” creator Robert Kirkman. Credit: Scott Garfield / AMC.

'Doonesbury' abortion story arc moves to Op-Ed page: A story line about a woman seeking an abortion in Texas prompts Times editors to relocate the strip from the comics pages for the arc’s six-day run.

'Doonesbury' abortion story arc moves to Op-Ed page: A story line about a woman seeking an abortion in Texas prompts Times editors to relocate the strip from the comics pages for the arc’s six-day run.

The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (a.k.a. “Obamacare”) runs 906 pages long. This new graphic novel by MIT healthcare economist Jonathan Gruber is probably way more entertaining to read.
Fantastic idea.
Image credit: Hill and Wang / Farrar, Straus and Giroux

The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (a.k.a. “Obamacare”) runs 906 pages long. This new graphic novel by MIT healthcare economist Jonathan Gruber is probably way more entertaining to read.

Fantastic idea.

Image credit: Hill and Wang / Farrar, Straus and Giroux

It’s the 50th anniversary of Marvel’s Spider-Man, and all year Hero Complex will talk to notable names about the character’s success and singular appeal.
Today: A guest essay by Neal Adams, one of the most influential comic-book artists of the modern era and one of the industry’s leading voices for artists’ rights.

And so with Superman the concept of superhero was born and flourished … until the dark ages of comics showed up with the fanatical attacks of Fredric Wertham and Congress. Comics nearly shut down, except for Superman, Batman, Wonder Woman, a bevy of new sparkle-toothed-born do-gooders. Not one bad thought existed in the minds of these heroes, whose books shared the spinner-rack with DC’s Pat Boone comics (yes, I said Pat Boone comics) and Jerry Lewis.
I was there, and it was hell.

Image:  Panel from the first Spider-Man story. Credit: Marvel Comics

It’s the 50th anniversary of Marvel’s Spider-Man, and all year Hero Complex will talk to notable names about the character’s success and singular appeal.

Today: A guest essay by Neal Adams, one of the most influential comic-book artists of the modern era and one of the industry’s leading voices for artists’ rights.

And so with Superman the concept of superhero was born and flourished … until the dark ages of comics showed up with the fanatical attacks of Fredric Wertham and Congress. Comics nearly shut down, except for Superman, Batman, Wonder Woman, a bevy of new sparkle-toothed-born do-gooders. Not one bad thought existed in the minds of these heroes, whose books shared the spinner-rack with DC’s Pat Boone comics (yes, I said Pat Boone comics) and Jerry Lewis.

I was there, and it was hell.

Image: Panel from the first Spider-Man story. Credit: Marvel Comics

Wonder Woman at 70: Geoff Boucher interviews writer Brian Azzarello and artist Cliff Chiang, the new creative team chronicling the adventures of the Amazon princess in the pages of DC Comics.

Illustrations: Covers of Wonder Woman #1 and #4. Credit: DC Comics

The Writing Life: Art Spiegelman explores living in the shadow of ‘Maus’: The success of his story of the Holocaust in graphic form has followed him since its publication. His latest book, ‘MetaMaus,’ deconstructs the original work.
Photo:  “MetaMaus,” Art Spiegelman’s latest book. Credit: Kirk McKoy / Los Angeles Times

The Writing Life: Art Spiegelman explores living in the shadow of ‘Maus’: The success of his story of the Holocaust in graphic form has followed him since its publication. His latest book, ‘MetaMaus,’ deconstructs the original work.

Photo: “MetaMaus,” Art Spiegelman’s latest book. Credit: Kirk McKoy / Los Angeles Times

"Foreskin Man" — an anti-circumcision superhero — is anti-Semitic, activists say:

A ballot measure to ban circumcision in San Francisco has taken a strange twist with the publication, by the measure’s sponsors, of a comic book in which an anti-circumcision superhero — blond, buff and handsome —battles evil Jewish characters who recall the stereotypical images of classic anti-Semitism.
"Foreskin Man" was written and created by Matthew Hess, one of the leaders behind the initiative to ban circumcision, the ritual cutting of foreskin on a baby’s penis that, in the Jewish religion, is considered central to the covenant between the Jewish people and God. Opponents consider it painful and barbaric, akin to female circumcision rites in Africa that have attracted international condemnation.

"Foreskin Man" — an anti-circumcision superhero — is anti-Semitic, activists say:

A ballot measure to ban circumcision in San Francisco has taken a strange twist with the publication, by the measure’s sponsors, of a comic book in which an anti-circumcision superhero — blond, buff and handsome —battles evil Jewish characters who recall the stereotypical images of classic anti-Semitism.

"Foreskin Man" was written and created by Matthew Hess, one of the leaders behind the initiative to ban circumcision, the ritual cutting of foreskin on a baby’s penis that, in the Jewish religion, is considered central to the covenant between the Jewish people and God. Opponents consider it painful and barbaric, akin to female circumcision rites in Africa that have attracted international condemnation.