Simply put, I do my best to keep errors of fact off the letters page; when one does run, a correction is published. Saying “there’s no sign humans have caused climate change” is not stating an opinion, it’s asserting a factual inaccuracy.

kqedscience:

As World’s Largest Solar Thermal Plant Opens, California Looks to End Solar Wars

After controversy over a threatened species delayed several large solar projects, state officials are trying to broker an agreement between conservation groups and solar companies on a path forward for renewable energy.”

Learn more in the latest radio story from KQED Science.

test reblogged from kqedscience

kqedscience:

How The West Coast Will Look Under 25 Feet Of Water
“Back in April, artist Nickolay Lamm put together a collection of illustrations of what some of the East Coast’s popular tourist destinations would look like under 25 feet of water, the potential sea level rise expected in the next few centuries. Since then, he’s added a few new destinations along the West Coast in California.”

Yikes - Venice Beach turns into Venice Bay.

kqedscience:

How The West Coast Will Look Under 25 Feet Of Water

Back in April, artist Nickolay Lamm put together a collection of illustrations of what some of the East Coast’s popular tourist destinations would look like under 25 feet of water, the potential sea level rise expected in the next few centuries. Since then, he’s added a few new destinations along the West Coast in California.”

Yikes - Venice Beach turns into Venice Bay.

test reblogged from kqedscience

climateadaptation:

The Guardian has a multi-part, video heavy media set on climate refugees in America. I’d argue that the title “first” is a misnomer and would point to the coastal communities in Texas, New Orleans, and the Carolinas who’ve been retreating from the coasts for several years.  But, the point is made - that sea-level rise and coastal erosion is much more aggressive than at anytime in history. Thus, tens of thousands of people are at immediate risk, especially the poor.
The above is one minute.

The people of Newtok, on the west coast of Alaska and about 400 miles south of the Bering Strait that separates the state from Russia, are living a slow-motion disaster that will end, very possibly within the next five years, with the entire village being washed away.
The Ninglick River coils around Newtok on three sides before emptying into the Bering Sea. It has steadily been eating away at the land, carrying off 100ft or more some years, in a process moving at unusual speed because of climate change. Eventually all of the villagers will have to leave, becoming America’s first climate change refugees.


Some great work here!

climateadaptation:

The Guardian has a multi-part, video heavy media set on climate refugees in America. I’d argue that the title “first” is a misnomer and would point to the coastal communities in Texas, New Orleans, and the Carolinas who’ve been retreating from the coasts for several years.  But, the point is made - that sea-level rise and coastal erosion is much more aggressive than at anytime in history. Thus, tens of thousands of people are at immediate risk, especially the poor.

The above is one minute.

The people of Newtok, on the west coast of Alaska and about 400 miles south of the Bering Strait that separates the state from Russia, are living a slow-motion disaster that will end, very possibly within the next five years, with the entire village being washed away.

The Ninglick River coils around Newtok on three sides before emptying into the Bering Sea. It has steadily been eating away at the land, carrying off 100ft or more some years, in a process moving at unusual speed because of climate change. Eventually all of the villagers will have to leave, becoming America’s first climate change refugees.

Some great work here!

test reblogged from climateadaptation

A new study suggests record warming is in store for us: By observing several indirect temperature indicators, researchers looking at weather patterns since the end of the last Ice Age are predicting that average surface temperatures will be at their highest point in human experience by the end of this century. 
Photo: John McConnico / Associated Press

A new study suggests record warming is in store for us: By observing several indirect temperature indicators, researchers looking at weather patterns since the end of the last Ice Age are predicting that average surface temperatures will be at their highest point in human experience by the end of this century. 

Photo: John McConnico / Associated Press

Polar bears remain a threatened species

The U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals decided to keep polar bears protected by broad federal measures Friday,

The court rejected the argument that the 25,000 remaining polar bears, most of which live in relatively stable populations, were perfectly fine without “threatened species” status. But many scientists worry that the effects of climate change on the Arctic climate could prove dangerous for the remaining bears.

And it looks like polar bears may remain on that list for the foreseeable future, according to Kassie Siegel of the Center for Biological Diversity.

"So for practical purposes, the listing of the polar bear is final, and really no longer under any serious threat from these challenges."

Read more about the court’s decision here, via Nation Now.

Photos: Jeon Heon-Kyun, Koen Van Weel / EPA, Sven Hoppe / Associated Press

The State of the Union comes to an end: President Obama covered a broad array of topics tonight, from the economy, the war in Afghanistan, sequestration cuts, education, an implied reference to drones and beyond. Regardless of the topics though, what’s important is how it’s received: So reblog with your feedback, we’ll collect many and put them up tomorrow: What did you think of the speech?

The State of the Union comes to an end: President Obama covered a broad array of topics tonight, from the economy, the war in Afghanistan, sequestration cuts, education, an implied reference to drones and beyond.

Regardless of the topics though, what’s important is how it’s received: So reblog with your feedback, we’ll collect many and put them up tomorrow: What did you think of the speech?