March 31 is Cesar Chavez’s birthday, and three states, including California, officially recognize Cesar Chavez Day as a holiday. Here’s a photographic look at the life and work of the late activist, whose campaign to organize farm workers still inspires.

Top photo: Chavez speaks to members of the United Farm Workers during a rally in the Imperial Valley on Feb. 2, 1979. Credit: Steve Fontanini / Los Angeles Times. Bottom photo: Chavez speaks at the United Farm Workers political endorsement conference in Los Angeles on Sept. 7, 1980. The conference endorsed Jimmy Carter. Credit: Los Angeles Times.
Since 1973, more than 100 earthquakes with a magnitude of 4 or higher have struck in the greater Los Angeles area. Our interactive map allows you to see the location, magnitude and date of each quake.

Friday’s 5.1 earthquake was a potent reminder of a fault that is less known to most Californians than the San Andreas, but that seismologists believe can produce a catastrophic disaster. That fault, the Puente Hills fault, is so dangerous because of its location, reporter Rong-Gong Lin II explains. Here’s our full coverage of Southern California’s recent earthquakes and an earthquake preparedness guide.

Map data: Southern California Earthquake Center

Since 1973, more than 100 earthquakes with a magnitude of 4 or higher have struck in the greater Los Angeles area. Our interactive map allows you to see the location, magnitude and date of each quake.

Friday’s 5.1 earthquake was a potent reminder of a fault that is less known to most Californians than the San Andreas, but that seismologists believe can produce a catastrophic disaster. That fault, the Puente Hills fault, is so dangerous because of its location, reporter Rong-Gong Lin II explains. Here’s our full coverage of Southern California’s recent earthquakes and an earthquake preparedness guide.

Map data: Southern California Earthquake Center

The population of L.A. County has passed 10 million, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. It’s the most populous county in the U.S., with nearly twice as many residents as the runner-up, Illinois’ Cook County.

Photo: The CicLAvia event in L.A. in 2013. Credit: Genaro Molina / Los Angeles Times

The population of L.A. County has passed 10 million, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. It’s the most populous county in the U.S., with nearly twice as many residents as the runner-up, Illinois’ Cook County.

Photo: The CicLAvia event in L.A. in 2013. Credit: Genaro Molina / Los Angeles Times

California’s calamitous drought drags on

It’s dry in California - historically dry. Water is in short supply, the air is noticeably without moisture, farms are parched and just look at the photo above of the state’s dwindling snow cover. It pretty much speaks for itself.

Meanwhile, various interests are turning to the political realm to try and ensure they get theirs when it comes to H2O.

And the drought has been particularly harsh on agriculture:

Ranchers have begun liquidating herds. Growers are considering tearing out thirsty tree crops such as nut orchards and citrus groves. And tens of thousands of additional acres of prime California soil could go unplanted if farmers don’t get enough water to irrigate them.

Read more on the drought’s effect on California here.

Photos: David McNew / Getty Images, Frederic J. Brown / Associated Press, NOAA, Randall Benton / Los Angeles Times

losangelespast:

A daredevil in golfing attire traipses along a steel beam high above the street during construction of the Los Angeles City Hall, 1927. The Hall of Justice and the old courthouse can be seen in the background.

losangelespast:

A daredevil in golfing attire traipses along a steel beam high above the street during construction of the Los Angeles City Hall, 1927. The Hall of Justice and the old courthouse can be seen in the background.

test reblogged from losangelespast

Gentrification forcing some L.A. gangs to commute to their turf

Los Angeles’ Echo Park, once a familiar stomping ground for the area’s gangs, has recently been hit with a wave of gentrification, with boutiques, coffee shops and rent increases displacing gang members.

Pushed out by this activity, many have been commuting to their turf only on the weekends, rapidly diminishing gang activity in the area. And now an injunction has been placed on Echo Park gangs, prohibiting them from congregating in a “safety zone” that envelops the neighborhood - even if they already live within its boundaries.

Officials praise it as a tool to make the neighborhood safer, but some residents say it places an unfair focus on minorities.

"The cops creep by and give me a look," said Salvador Aguirre, an Echo Park native who protested the injunction this summer.

"Being bald and Mexican American, we’re all looked at the same. We’re all the problems. I don’t want to be looked at twice."

Read reporter Marisa Gerber’s full story here.

Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times

New, fake Red Hot Chili Peppers song: “Abracadabralifornia”

Complete with the mandatory flurry of California references. A big hats-off to comedian Jon Daly, who put the parody together ahead of the band’s appearance at the Super Bowl halftime show this weekend.

How many snakes can you fit into one house?
Maybe one if you’re a little squeamish about them? A few dozen if you don’t particularly care about seeing a bunch peek out from your laundry hamper or pantry?Now try and imagine having as many as 400 snakes in your house. That’s just what police found at a home in Santa Ana earlier today while serving a police warrant. Officers reportedly could smell the stench of the snakes, many of which were in terrible condition, if not dead, from up to 300 feet away.
Read the full, sad story over at L.A. Now.
Photo: Irfan Khan / Los Angeles Times

How many snakes can you fit into one house?

Maybe one if you’re a little squeamish about them? A few dozen if you don’t particularly care about seeing a bunch peek out from your laundry hamper or pantry?

Now try and imagine having as many as 400 snakes in your house. That’s just what police found at a home in Santa Ana earlier today while serving a police warrant. Officers reportedly could smell the stench of the snakes, many of which were in terrible condition, if not dead, from up to 300 feet away.

Read the full, sad story over at L.A. Now.

Photo: Irfan Khan / Los Angeles Times

wired:

Look at all those subway stops! No, it’s not NYC. This is what San Francisco and L.A. could look like…

If you live in a city and take public transit, you’ve probably looked at the system map and thought to yourself, “I wish this thing went everywhere.”

You’re not alone. There’s a whole bunch of daydreamers just like you who’ve considered the additional subway lines, bus routes, and train tracks it would take to bring more people to more places. Some of them have even mapped these ideas out. The internet is full of these fantasy transit maps, where professional transit planners and dedicated amateurs alike imagine how public transit in our cities could look.

[MORE: 13 Fake Public Transit Systems We Wish Existed]

One day Los Angeles, one day…

test reblogged from wired

The dusty decimation of California’s drought

California’s longstanding drought has escalated in recent months, with 62.7% of the state now in what the Department of Agriculture deems “extreme” conditions.

But in few places is it as easily visualized as in the area surrounding the vanishing Cachuma Lake, which has become one of the most prominent victims of the lack of rain.

In years past, the spot where Bozarth was standing was under 30, 40, even 50 feet of water. It wasn’t all that long ago that Cachuma “spilled” — filled to the brim, to the point where millions of gallons of clean, fresh water was released through the dam’s gates and cast into the sea, a display of surplus that is laughable today.

That was only three years ago. Now, said Tom Fayram, Santa Barbara County’s deputy public works director, “it’s just empty.”

Read reporter Scott Gold’s full story here.

Photos: Brian van der Brug, Lorena Iñiguez Elebee / Los Angeles Times

A tiny, retro run-in with the law
From a 1970 story we ran on some highly restrictive anti-motorbike measures that brought an 11-year-old boy at odds with the law:

Randy West, 11, took it like a man Wednesday – his first brush with the law and the news that his favorite minibike trails were off limits.
The sandy-haired youngster was one of the first to receive a warning citation from police as the result of a new ordinance which places virtually insurmountable restrictions on use of private property for motorcycle or minibike riding in the city.
“If it’s the law, you gotta obey it,” said Randy moments after receiving the warning citation for riding his minibike on a popular trail between Huntington Center and the San Diego Freeway.

Photo: Cliff Otto / Los Angeles Times

A tiny, retro run-in with the law

From a 1970 story we ran on some highly restrictive anti-motorbike measures that brought an 11-year-old boy at odds with the law:

Randy West, 11, took it like a man Wednesday – his first brush with the law and the news that his favorite minibike trails were off limits.

The sandy-haired youngster was one of the first to receive a warning citation from police as the result of a new ordinance which places virtually insurmountable restrictions on use of private property for motorcycle or minibike riding in the city.

“If it’s the law, you gotta obey it,” said Randy moments after receiving the warning citation for riding his minibike on a popular trail between Huntington Center and the San Diego Freeway.

Photo: Cliff Otto / Los Angeles Times

Santa Monica’s famous mosaic home

Aziz and Louise Farnam started their decoration habits humbly enough - putting a single periwinkle square up into the corner of a retaining wall in their Santa Monica home. But things quickly, and colorfully, escalated from there:

Theycollected pieces of cobalt blue, aqua, plum and yellows from pale to sunny. They broke or cut them with special nippers into irregular shapes and applied those to the wall, letting them radiate in no particular pattern from the original piece.

They finished that wall, then tiled the walkway to the front door.

From there, things escalated — to a traffic-stopping degree. Motorists routinely slam on their brakes to marvel at the eccentric artistry.

"Everyone knows my house," Louise said. "Just say ‘mosaic tile house in Santa Monica.’"

Read more in our latest Column One feature.

Photos: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

Building a hockey rink in Dodgers Stadium

Saturday, right in the middle of Dodgers stadium, the Los Angeles Kings and Anaheim Ducks will face off in the first NHL regular season game held outdoors west of the Rocky Mountains.

But beyond the technical feat of having an ice rink in the middle of a warm L.A. January, there’s an intangible joy to the project.

As Dan Craig, the man leading the icy project put it:

"The satisfaction for me will be when the guys skate out there. Nobody has to tell me.

I’ll know well ahead of them what they’re going to feel, and I’ll know from how I see them skate and how I see their eyes and the expression on their face. When you get guys from 19 to 39 just grinning from ear to ear and loving being out there, that’s what we do.”

Read columnist Helene Elliott’s full story right here.

Photos: Wally Skalij / Los Angeles Times, Nick Ut / Associated Press

Chronicling Los Angeles’ “death alley” and beyond

image

A two mile corridor of South Vermont Ave. has become one of the most dangerous areas in the country, with sixty people killed in the area since 2007. And that stretch borders Westmont, a county that ranks as among L.A.’s most dangerous.

Westmont’s homicide figure is about the same as the combined total in Highland Park, Glendale, Pasadena, Eagle Rock, Glassell Park and Atwater Village, an area with 14 times as many residents and some neighborhoods that have experienced gang problems of their own.

Our newly-revamped Homicide Report will be keeping an eye on Westmont’s continued problems, along with documenting every other killing in L.A. County that may otherwise fall through the cracks.

Reporter Nicole Santa Cruz will continue to speak to families and neighborhoods impacted by tragedy, and our database of those who have fallen since 2007 continues to improve.

Examine the new Homicide Report right here, and feel free to reach out with any feedback you may have on how we can improve our efforts.

latimespast:

This Throwback Thursday, we’re taking you back in time at the happiest place on earth. Yes, we’ve dug into our archives and found some old Disneyland photos, including some of Walt Disney himself (seen in the middle photo inspecting plastic heads for a “Pirates of the Caribbean” addition to the park) and then-Vice President Richard Nixon (shaking hands with a man in a spacesuit in the bottom photo).

But perhaps the sweetest and most surprising story is behind the top photo. It’s of 14-year-old Jong Sook Kim visiting Disneyland in 1964. She was from South Korea and was in America to get surgery on her eyes — doctors once thought she’d never see again. After the operation in San Francisco, she went to see Disneyland with her newly restored sight.

Read more and see more photos here

Laura E. Davis

(Photos: Los Angeles Times / UCLA Library)

A Throwback Thursday so good it survived until the weekend.

test reblogged from latimespast