Arnold Schwarzenegger’s official gubernatorial portrait was unveiled this week in Sacramento, with a slight modification from its original design: In it, he was once depicted wearing a lapel pin that bore the image of his now-former wife, Maria Shriver.
There’s a smudge where the pin used to be now.
Photo: Schwarzenegger poses with the portrait after it was unveiled at the Capitol in Sacramento on Sept. 8. Credit: Rich Pedroncelli / Associated Press

Arnold Schwarzenegger’s official gubernatorial portrait was unveiled this week in Sacramento, with a slight modification from its original design: In it, he was once depicted wearing a lapel pin that bore the image of his now-former wife, Maria Shriver.

There’s a smudge where the pin used to be now.

Photo: Schwarzenegger poses with the portrait after it was unveiled at the Capitol in Sacramento on Sept. 8. Credit: Rich Pedroncelli / Associated Press

I probably will sign it, yes.

Take California.

Make six states.

See pluribus ruin ‘em.

"In a place where rainfall averages two inches a year, rocks are being shoved around by mechanisms typically seen in arctic climes."
Two cousins’ stroke of luck has provided the final evidence in solving a mystery of the Racetrack Playa that has long puzzled visitors and scientists: What mechanism moves rocks across flat dirt in the heart of the hottest, driest place on earth?

"In a place where rainfall averages two inches a year, rocks are being shoved around by mechanisms typically seen in arctic climes."

Two cousins’ stroke of luck has provided the final evidence in solving a mystery of the Racetrack Playa that has long puzzled visitors and scientists: What mechanism moves rocks across flat dirt in the heart of the hottest, driest place on earth?

A huge swell generated by Hurricane Marie is sending dozens of surfers and bodyboarders to the SoCal beaches today.

Photos: Top and bottom by Don Bartletti / Los Angeles Times; middle by Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

"This is not a question of ‘Maybe these buildings will come down,’  they absolutely will come down."
Thousands of brick buildings in California are still not retrofitted and are in danger of collapse in an earthquake. Seismic experts are particularly worried about communities in western San Bernardino County, which are threatened by the San Andreas and San Jacinto faults. The city of San Bernardino, which is in bankruptcy, has one of the largest concentration of unreinforced masonry buildings in the state that are at risk of particularly intense ground motion, U.S. Geological Survey seismologist Lucy Jones says.

"This is not a question of ‘Maybe these buildings will come down,’  they absolutely will come down."

Thousands of brick buildings in California are still not retrofitted and are in danger of collapse in an earthquake. Seismic experts are particularly worried about communities in western San Bernardino County, which are threatened by the San Andreas and San Jacinto faults. The city of San Bernardino, which is in bankruptcy, has one of the largest concentration of unreinforced masonry buildings in the state that are at risk of particularly intense ground motion, U.S. Geological Survey seismologist Lucy Jones says.

Officials say an earthquake early-warning system provided an alert 10 seconds before the 6.0 quake was felt in the Bay Area yesterday.

Officials say an earthquake early-warning system provided an alert 10 seconds before the 6.0 quake was felt in the Bay Area yesterday.

An estimated 63 trillion gallons of groundwater have been lost in the ongoing drought in the western United States, a study finds. The loss has caused the Earth to lift up, on average, about 0.16 inches over the last 18 months.
Photo: Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times

An estimated 63 trillion gallons of groundwater have been lost in the ongoing drought in the western United States, a study finds. The loss has caused the Earth to lift up, on average, about 0.16 inches over the last 18 months.

Photo: Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times

This gif shows the progression of California’s drought since 2011. See it unfold more slowly with these 188 maps.

This gif shows the progression of California’s drought since 2011. See it unfold more slowly with these 188 maps.

California has broken a drought record this year, but it’s not the first time the state has been parched. Here’s a look at some drought photos from years past.

Top photo: An Edison worker surveys Catalina Island’s Thompson Reservoir on May 26, 177. Credit: Joe Kennedy / Los Angeles Times. Bottom photo: A Hereford gazes over a hill toward the bleached bones of a steer on grazing land near Cima, Calif., on April 18, 1963. Credit: Ben Olender / Los Angeles Times

UCLA’s Pauley Pavilion is mostly dry today after being flooded with water as deep as 8 inches yesterday because of a water main break on Sunset Boulevard. The break sent a geyser shooting 30 feet in the air and deluged Sunset and the campus with 8 million to 10 million gallons of water. Workers used brooms, squeegees, vacuums and floor cleaners to remove the water from the Pavilion, which underwent a $136-million renovation that was completed in 2012.

Photos: Jabin Botsford / Los Angeles Times