Family reunited by an AP photo
Nicholas Simmons vanished from his parents’ home in New York on New Year’s Day, only to be rediscovered by Associated Press photographer Jacquelyn Martin, who was documenting the winter cold in Washington, D.C.
Said Martin of their coincidental meeting:

"It struck me how young he was. I again introduced myself and shook his hand. He said his name was Nick."

She took her photos, filed them to the news wire, but after her work was featured in USA Today, Simmons’ parents realized that their son was in D.C., and the family was soon reunited.
Read the full story over at Nation Now.
Photo: Jacquelyn Martin / Associated Press

Family reunited by an AP photo

Nicholas Simmons vanished from his parents’ home in New York on New Year’s Day, only to be rediscovered by Associated Press photographer Jacquelyn Martin, who was documenting the winter cold in Washington, D.C.

Said Martin of their coincidental meeting:

"It struck me how young he was. I again introduced myself and shook his hand. He said his name was Nick."

She took her photos, filed them to the news wire, but after her work was featured in USA Today, Simmons’ parents realized that their son was in D.C., and the family was soon reunited.

Read the full story over at Nation Now.

Photo: Jacquelyn Martin / Associated Press

Another rough day for the White House

Today continued the rough-and-tumble week for the Obama administration, following…

Attorney General Eric Holder today recused himself from the investigation into his own department’s probe of multiple AP reporters and editors, while announcing an extensive investigation into the IRS matter.

Holder also defended the seizure of AP records, claiming the AP’s leaked information posed a danger to the public:

"It put the American people at risk and that is not hyperbole. And trying to determine who is responsible for that requires aggressive action.”

White House Jay Carney refused to comment on the AP scandal, citing an ongoing investigation, but did say the White House, to his knowledge, had no idea about the IRS screening until just a few weeks ago.

Read more on the latest in the IRS mess and AP scandal over at Politics Now.

Photos: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images, Pablo Martinez Monsivais, Mark Lennihan / Associated Press

Justice Department secretly taps into AP reporters’ phone records
In a surprising declaration a short time ago, the Associated Press revealed that the Justice Department had obtained two months of phone records tied to numerous reporters and editors in various cities, in what the news organization is calling a “massive and unprecedented intrusion.”
The reason for the government’s actions, which the AP was alerted to in a letter Friday, are as of now unknown.
From the Associated Press’ story on the emerging scandal:

In all, the government seized those records for more than 20 separate telephone lines assigned to AP and its journalists in April and May of 2012. The exact number of journalists who used the phone lines during that period is unknown but more than 100 journalists work in the offices whose phone records were targeted on a wide array of stories about government and other matters.

AP’s President and CEO, Gary Pruitt, issued a strongly-worded letter to Attorney General Eric Holder:

We regard this action by the Department of Justice as a serious interference with AP’s constitutional rights to gather and report the news. While we evaluate our options we urgently request that you immediately return to the AP the telephone toll records that the Department subpoenaed and destroy all copies.

Read the full story via Politics Now.
Photo: Molly Riley / Associated Press

Justice Department secretly taps into AP reporters’ phone records

In a surprising declaration a short time ago, the Associated Press revealed that the Justice Department had obtained two months of phone records tied to numerous reporters and editors in various cities, in what the news organization is calling a “massive and unprecedented intrusion.”

The reason for the government’s actions, which the AP was alerted to in a letter Friday, are as of now unknown.

From the Associated Press’ story on the emerging scandal:

In all, the government seized those records for more than 20 separate telephone lines assigned to AP and its journalists in April and May of 2012. The exact number of journalists who used the phone lines during that period is unknown but more than 100 journalists work in the offices whose phone records were targeted on a wide array of stories about government and other matters.

AP’s President and CEO, Gary Pruitt, issued a strongly-worded letter to Attorney General Eric Holder:

We regard this action by the Department of Justice as a serious interference with AP’s constitutional rights to gather and report the news. While we evaluate our options we urgently request that you immediately return to the AP the telephone toll records that the Department subpoenaed and destroy all copies.
Read the full story via Politics Now.

Photo: Molly Riley / Associated Press

Today in terrifying fake news
The Associated Press’ Twitter account was hacked earlier today, sending out a false report of explosions at the White House. The tweet was swiftly debunked, no report was sent on the AP news wire and Twitter has since suspended the account.
But that didn’t stop some from immediately believing the fraudulent tweet. Note the sudden plunge in the Dow Jones Industrial Average at the time the tweet went out:
In the wake of the now-notorious tweet, and the outrage last week over a number of grassroots amateur detectives on Reddit working to solve the Boston Marathon bombings, it’s important to remember that not everything online should be taken at face value.
Photos: Twitter, Google

Today in terrifying fake news

The Associated Press’ Twitter account was hacked earlier today, sending out a false report of explosions at the White House. The tweet was swiftly debunked, no report was sent on the AP news wire and Twitter has since suspended the account.

But that didn’t stop some from immediately believing the fraudulent tweet. Note the sudden plunge in the Dow Jones Industrial Average at the time the tweet went out:

In the wake of the now-notorious tweet, and the outrage last week over a number of grassroots amateur detectives on Reddit working to solve the Boston Marathon bombings, it’s important to remember that not everything online should be taken at face value.

Photos: Twitter, Google

AP pronounces them wife and wifeWith a changing in cultural norms comes a change in the Associated Press’ style. After outrage arose following a leaked memo revealing that the longstanding news organization was advising writers to refer to married gay couples as “partners,” instead of husbands or wives.
The new entry in the style book under “husband, wife” reads:

Regardless of sexual orientation, ‘husband’ or ‘wife’ is acceptable in all references to individuals in any legally recognized marriage. ‘Spouse’ or ‘partner’ may be used if requested.

Read more on vernacular open-mindedness here.

AP pronounces them wife and wife

With a changing in cultural norms comes a change in the Associated Press’ style. After outrage arose following a leaked memo revealing that the longstanding news organization was advising writers to refer to married gay couples as “partners,” instead of husbands or wives.

The new entry in the style book under “husband, wife” reads:

Regardless of sexual orientation, ‘husband’ or ‘wife’ is acceptable in all references to individuals in any legally recognized marriage. ‘Spouse’ or ‘partner’ may be used if requested.

Read more on vernacular open-mindedness here.