Apple says it is working to bring more racial diversity to emoji.
"There needs to be more diversity in the emoji character set, and we have been working closely with the Unicode Consortium in an effort to update the standard," Katie Cotton, vice president of worldwide corporate communications at Apple, wrote in an email to MTV.

Apple says it is working to bring more racial diversity to emoji.

"There needs to be more diversity in the emoji character set, and we have been working closely with the Unicode Consortium in an effort to update the standard," Katie Cotton, vice president of worldwide corporate communications at Apple, wrote in an email to MTV.

30 years since the launch of the first Macintosh computer

And little has been the same ever since. But as tech reporter Chris O’Brien reminds us, Apple’s revolutionary personal computer didn’t have the easiest of debuts:

Apple sold 70,000 Macintosh computers by April. But by the end of the year, it was selling only 10,000 a month. By January 1985, with the company discontinuing the Lisa [another of its computers], Apple was plunged into a crisis. 

The result over the next several months was a showdown of sorts between Sculley and Jobs that the latter eventually lost, leading to his departure from Apple that summer. 

Less than 18 months after the launch of the Macintosh brought Jobs international acclaim, he was out of the company he founded.

Head to Tech Now for more the Macintosh’s 30th anniversary.

There’s no live stream of Apple’s event today
But you can follow along with our tech reporters Salvador Rodriguez and Chris O’Brien as they offer updates live from the scene of Apple’s expected debut of two new iPhone models.
Check out their feed here.

There’s no live stream of Apple’s event today

But you can follow along with our tech reporters Salvador Rodriguez and Chris O’Brien as they offer updates live from the scene of Apple’s expected debut of two new iPhone models.

Check out their feed here.

Happy Fifth Anniversary App Store! Steve Jobs didn’t want you.
As Apple fanatics mark the fifth anniversary of the wildly-successful and game changing app store that has proved so integral to the success of the iPhone, it’s worth remembering that legendary former CEO Steve Jobs wasn’t for such a marketplace from the beginning:

…when the iPhone first landed in 2007, the company was primarily concerned that it actually work and be seen as a stable device when it got into the hands of users. So Apple did not make it possible for third parties to write apps that ran on the phone, worried that glitchy apps might ding the iPhone’s reputation.

Read the full story on the App Store’s emergence, prompted in part by the persistent efforts of jailbreakers, via tech reporter Chris O’Brien here.
Photo: Evan Vucci / Associated Press

Happy Fifth Anniversary App Store! Steve Jobs didn’t want you.

As Apple fanatics mark the fifth anniversary of the wildly-successful and game changing app store that has proved so integral to the success of the iPhone, it’s worth remembering that legendary former CEO Steve Jobs wasn’t for such a marketplace from the beginning:

…when the iPhone first landed in 2007, the company was primarily concerned that it actually work and be seen as a stable device when it got into the hands of users. So Apple did not make it possible for third parties to write apps that ran on the phone, worried that glitchy apps might ding the iPhone’s reputation.

Read the full story on the App Store’s emergence, prompted in part by the persistent efforts of jailbreakers, via tech reporter Chris O’Brien here.

Photo: Evan Vucci / Associated Press

The saga of a lost iPhone

For many people, losing their phone is an inconvenience, but for Times reporter Nita Lelyveld, losing her iPhone prompted the realization of just how indispensable the device is as the hours and days ticked by.

While she had the ability to spot the location of her phone, and she was badgering it with text messages in hope of reaching a good mobile Samaritan, the iPhone remained lost, and her calls for help went unanswered.

By now I’d realized that everything on my phone was backed up. This wasn’t about lost photos — or even, really, the phone.

I felt toyed with. I was angry. I was ready to get mean.

I decided I would make my phone play its “find me” ping each time it was turned on.

I had also discovered that if I put it in something called Lost Mode, I could have it display a big message — filling the screen.

To Anaheim, I sent stern words: “I’m watching you! Return my phone.”

Find out how phone and owner were finally reunited over at our latest Column One feature, or follow Nita on Twitter over at @LATimescitybeat.

Photos: Nita Lelyveld / Los Angeles Times

Silicon Valley’s squishy, feel-good language
The tech firms that dominate Silicon Valley are largely data-driven, high-concept businesses brimming with complexities. So how do they present the culmination of their technological prowess?
Try Joshua Reeves of ZenPayroll Inc., who seeks to describe the feeling his company provides as delightful.

"That’s the effect we’re trying to achieve," said Reeves, whose company has applied to trademark "delightful payroll." "We talk about how to create that ‘aha moment,’ that feeling the first time you use it where you just stop and say, ‘This is amazing. Why weren’t you here 10 years ago?’"

In fact, the word “delight” pops up Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer has used it, as has Dropbox co-founder Drew Houston and most importantly of all, the late Apple co-founder Steve Jobs.
Read the full story in our latest Column One feature. And maybe, just maybe, you’ll get some delight out of it.
Photo: Times Wire Services

Silicon Valley’s squishy, feel-good language

The tech firms that dominate Silicon Valley are largely data-driven, high-concept businesses brimming with complexities. So how do they present the culmination of their technological prowess?

Try Joshua Reeves of ZenPayroll Inc., who seeks to describe the feeling his company provides as delightful.

"That’s the effect we’re trying to achieve," said Reeves, whose company has applied to trademark "delightful payroll." "We talk about how to create that ‘aha moment,’ that feeling the first time you use it where you just stop and say, ‘This is amazing. Why weren’t you here 10 years ago?’"

In fact, the word “delight” pops up Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer has used it, as has Dropbox co-founder Drew Houston and most importantly of all, the late Apple co-founder Steve Jobs.

Read the full story in our latest Column One feature. And maybe, just maybe, you’ll get some delight out of it.

Photo: Times Wire Services

So long, drearily-designed Silicon Valley
Awash with cash, the technology companies that have come to define Silicon Valley are just coming to realize how much of an eyesore their offices can be.

Rather than complementing the lush rolling hills to the west and the expansive San Francisco Bay to the east, this high-tech hub has produced an unending line of dreary office parks full of two-story, cubicle-lined buildings whose main visual goal is to escape notice.

Pictured above, for example, is concept art for Apple’s gigantic new headquarters plan, dubbed “Apple Campus 2,” planned to occupy 175 acres.
Read more on the valley’s other upcoming projects here.
Photo: Foster + Partners, cupertino.org

So long, drearily-designed Silicon Valley

Awash with cash, the technology companies that have come to define Silicon Valley are just coming to realize how much of an eyesore their offices can be.

Rather than complementing the lush rolling hills to the west and the expansive San Francisco Bay to the east, this high-tech hub has produced an unending line of dreary office parks full of two-story, cubicle-lined buildings whose main visual goal is to escape notice.

Pictured above, for example, is concept art for Apple’s gigantic new headquarters plan, dubbed “Apple Campus 2,” planned to occupy 175 acres.

Read more on the valley’s other upcoming projects here.

Photo: Foster + Partners, cupertino.org

The Red (computer) Scare: Is the Chinese military behind hundreds of hacking instances since 2006? One U.S. computer security firm believes so, fanning concerns that U.S. digital infrastructure, both private and governmental, isn’t up to snuff. From reporter Michael Muskall’s look at Mandiant’s findings:

The hacking activity was likely part of the mandate of the Unit 61398 of China’s People’s Liberation Army, identified in the report as “one of the most persistent of China’s cyber threat actors.” The unit is based in the Pudong New Area, outside of Shanghai from where the computer attacks originate.

Read the report for yourself here, and see if you agree that the recent hacking spree, which has targeted companies from Facebook and Apple to the New York Times and Wall Street Journal, is being dictated by the Chinese government.
Photo: Keith Bedford / Bloomberg

The Red (computer) Scare: Is the Chinese military behind hundreds of hacking instances since 2006? One U.S. computer security firm believes so, fanning concerns that U.S. digital infrastructure, both private and governmental, isn’t up to snuff. From reporter Michael Muskall’s look at Mandiant’s findings:

The hacking activity was likely part of the mandate of the Unit 61398 of China’s People’s Liberation Army, identified in the report as “one of the most persistent of China’s cyber threat actors.” The unit is based in the Pudong New Area, outside of Shanghai from where the computer attacks originate.

Read the report for yourself here, and see if you agree that the recent hacking spree, which has targeted companies from Facebook and Apple to the New York Times and Wall Street Journal, is being dictated by the Chinese government.

Photo: Keith Bedford / Bloomberg

If you build it, porn will come: Vine, the hot new Twitter app that allows users to post six-second video loops, now has an age restriction after users immediately began to flood the app with pornographic clips.

Now when users attempt to download Vine, they are first prompted to confirm that they are at least 17 years old before the app begins installing.

Read more about Vine, and the implications of its popularity for similar services, here.
Image: Vine

If you build it, porn will come: Vine, the hot new Twitter app that allows users to post six-second video loops, now has an age restriction after users immediately began to flood the app with pornographic clips.

Now when users attempt to download Vine, they are first prompted to confirm that they are at least 17 years old before the app begins installing.

Read more about Vine, and the implications of its popularity for similar services, here.

Image: Vine

Apple officially announces iPhone 5: As you’ve no doubt heard, the big unveiling was today. Apple says iPhone 5 is thinner and lighter than the previous model, even though it has a bigger screen.

The iPhone 5 features a larger screen and weighs 112 grams, or about 4 ounces, which is 20% lighter than the iPhone 4S. It is also 18% thinner, Apple’s marketing chief Phil Schiller said. It has an improved A6 processor that is twice as fast as its predecessor, high-speed 4G LTE connectivity and a widescreen aspect ratio.

Apple has also improved the device’s battery life and updated both of its cameras, giving its front camera 720p HD video. The company also announced a smaller dock connector for the device and a new cable charger named Lightning that is 80% smaller than its predecessor.

Video: Apple’s CEO Tim Cook introduces iPhone 5 to a packed house. Credit: Associated Press

Steve Jobs' failed Apple uniform idea

Sony, with its appreciation for style, had gotten the famous designer Issey Miyake to create its uniform. It was a jacket made of rip-stop nylon with sleeves that could unzip to make it a vest. So Jobs called Issey Miyake and asked him to design a vest for Apple…

Steve Jobs’ virtual DNA to be fostered in Apple University:  To survive its late founder, Apple and Steve Jobs planned a training program in which company executives will be taught to think like him, in “a forum to impart that DNA to future generations.” Key to this effort is Joel Podolny, former Yale Business School dean.
Photo: Steve Jobs helped plan Apple University — an executive training program to help Apple carry on without him. Credit: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

Steve Jobs’ virtual DNA to be fostered in Apple University: To survive its late founder, Apple and Steve Jobs planned a training program in which company executives will be taught to think like him, in “a forum to impart that DNA to future generations.” Key to this effort is Joel Podolny, former Yale Business School dean.

Photo: Steve Jobs helped plan Apple University — an executive training program to help Apple carry on without him. Credit: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

laughingsquid:

Steve Jobs (1955-2011)

laughingsquid:

Steve Jobs (1955-2011)

test reblogged from carolynkellogg

The Times' Apple iPhone live coverage

Times reporter David Sarno tweets from Cupertino.