The Supreme Court appears timid about expanding same-sex marriage, writes editorial cartoonist and commentator David Horsey.Read the full story here. 

The Supreme Court appears timid about expanding same-sex marriage, writes editorial cartoonist and commentator David Horsey.

Read the full story here

Editorial cartoonist and commentator David Horsey takes U.S. Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia to task for his comments this week during oral arguments over a challenge to the 1965 Voting Rights Act.
In 2006 when Congress extended the act for 25 years, Horsey writes:

The vote was overwhelming in the House, unanimous in the Senate and was hailed by President George W. Bush as a victory for American democracy.
In court on Wednesday, however, Scalia mocked that vote. He said the Senate’s unanimity simply proved the law had not been given serious consideration. The senators were afraid, he said, to cast a vote against a law with a “wonderful” name. He went on to assert that the reauthorization f thewas merely “a phenomenon that is called perpetuation of racial entitlement.”
That sort of legal reasoning may be good enough for someone sitting on a bar stool well into his third pint, but it is not good enough for the highest court in the land. Scalia makes self-serving assumptions about what was on the minds of senators in 2006 — afraid, not serious, enamored with a name — with no facts to back up his barbs.

Read the full post: http://lat.ms/XeTuFn

Editorial cartoonist and commentator David Horsey takes U.S. Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia to task for his comments this week during oral arguments over a challenge to the 1965 Voting Rights Act.

In 2006 when Congress extended the act for 25 years, Horsey writes:

The vote was overwhelming in the House, unanimous in the Senate and was hailed by President George W. Bush as a victory for American democracy.

In court on Wednesday, however, Scalia mocked that vote. He said the Senate’s unanimity simply proved the law had not been given serious consideration. The senators were afraid, he said, to cast a vote against a law with a “wonderful” name. He went on to assert that the reauthorization f thewas merely “a phenomenon that is called perpetuation of racial entitlement.”

That sort of legal reasoning may be good enough for someone sitting on a bar stool well into his third pint, but it is not good enough for the highest court in the land. Scalia makes self-serving assumptions about what was on the minds of senators in 2006 — afraid, not serious, enamored with a name — with no facts to back up his barbs.

Read the full post: http://lat.ms/XeTuFn

Cartoonist and commentator David Horsey on the 112th Congress: Underwhelming. 

Cartoonist and commentator David Horsey on the 112th Congress: Underwhelming