You are what you ‘like,’ - at least on Facebook
Researchers at the University of Cambridge have taken a look at just a hint of the massive amount of personal information and actions stored by Facebook, and their findings confirm a privacy advocate’s worst nightmare: You may not have to tell Facebook about who you are, so long as they know how you interactions on the site.

Even traits that users of social networks may not want to broadcast — including smoking behavior, drug use or sexuality — can be sussed out pretty accurately by their patterns of likes, the researchers found after combing through data from 58,466 Facebook members in the U.S. 

But for Facebook, all of that data, and the conclusions that can be drawn from it, is just an extension of the status quo.
From Facebook public policy manager Fred Wolens:

"No matter the vehicle for information — a bumper sticker, yard sign, logos on clothing or other data found online — it has already been proven that it is possible for social scientists to draw conclusions about personal attributes based on these characteristics."

Photo: Associated Press

You are what you ‘like,’ - at least on Facebook

Researchers at the University of Cambridge have taken a look at just a hint of the massive amount of personal information and actions stored by Facebook, and their findings confirm a privacy advocate’s worst nightmare: You may not have to tell Facebook about who you are, so long as they know how you interactions on the site.

Even traits that users of social networks may not want to broadcast — including smoking behavior, drug use or sexuality — can be sussed out pretty accurately by their patterns of likes, the researchers found after combing through data from 58,466 Facebook members in the U.S. 

But for Facebook, all of that data, and the conclusions that can be drawn from it, is just an extension of the status quo.

From Facebook public policy manager Fred Wolens:

"No matter the vehicle for information — a bumper sticker, yard sign, logos on clothing or other data found online — it has already been proven that it is possible for social scientists to draw conclusions about personal attributes based on these characteristics."

Photo: Associated Press

  1. diegobasly reblogged this from latimes and added:
    Siempre lo supimos.
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  5. yeezy-breezy-beautiful reblogged this from latimes and added:
    so fb stalking is accurate?
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  13. measureindeltalove reblogged this from latimes and added:
    So, I read the journal article that they linked to, and it said one of the top identifying Likes for low intelligence...
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