I probably will sign it, yes.
A Great Dane in Oregon has fully recovered after having 43 ½ socks surgically removed from its stomach.
Perhaps even more astonishing: This is coming to light because the dog’s story was submitted to a “They Ate WHAT?” contest for veterinary hospitals, and it came in third. First place went to a clinic that treated a frog that had eaten more than 30 small rocks. (The frog also recovered.) You can see X-rays of the other winning entrants, and honorable mentions (including a bearded dragon that ate a small toy banana), at Veterinary Practice News.
Photos: DoveLewis Emergency Animal Hospital

A Great Dane in Oregon has fully recovered after having 43 ½ socks surgically removed from its stomach.

Perhaps even more astonishing: This is coming to light because the dog’s story was submitted to a “They Ate WHAT?” contest for veterinary hospitals, and it came in third. First place went to a clinic that treated a frog that had eaten more than 30 small rocks. (The frog also recovered.) You can see X-rays of the other winning entrants, and honorable mentions (including a bearded dragon that ate a small toy banana), at Veterinary Practice News.

Photos: DoveLewis Emergency Animal Hospital

With three plane diversions in nine days caused by passenger fights over shrinking legroom, here’s a look at the airlines with the most and least legroom in economy. Spirit Airlines has the least legroom in the industry — and the highest profit margin.

With three plane diversions in nine days caused by passenger fights over shrinking legroom, here’s a look at the airlines with the most and least legroom in economy. Spirit Airlines has the least legroom in the industry — and the highest profit margin.

There is a window of opportunity to tamp this down, but that window is closing. We need action now.
Video purports to show Islamic State beheading another U.S. journalist
latimespast:

"There must have been 50,000 marchers" in the 1937 Labor Day parade in downtown Los Angeles, according to Secretary J. W. Buzzell of Central Labor Council.
For years, major parades were held in downtown L.A. to mark the holiday. See some of them here, and read more about 1937’s celebration.
Photo: Los Angeles Times archive / UCLA

On this Labor Day, columnist Jim Newton gives an assessment of L.A.’s economic outlook. 

latimespast:

"There must have been 50,000 marchers" in the 1937 Labor Day parade in downtown Los Angeles, according to Secretary J. W. Buzzell of Central Labor Council.

For years, major parades were held in downtown L.A. to mark the holiday. See some of them here, and read more about 1937’s celebration.

Photo: Los Angeles Times archive / UCLA

On this Labor Day, columnist Jim Newton gives an assessment of L.A.’s economic outlook

test reblogged from latimespast

Take California.

Make six states.

See pluribus ruin ‘em.

Drones at “The Happiest Place on Earth”? Disney appears to have a wish to use unmanned aircraft to produce entertainment shows, according to three recently published patent applications.
Photo: Christina House / For The Times

Drones at “The Happiest Place on Earth”? Disney appears to have a wish to use unmanned aircraft to produce entertainment shows, according to three recently published patent applications.

Photo: Christina House / For The Times

Using light, scientists make bad memories good in mice
latimespast:

"Mary Poppins" began its "regular engagement" at the Chinese Theater 50 years ago today. When The Times reviewed it (earlier in August of 1964), Philip K. Scheuer wrote:

"Mary Poppins" is the complete fantasy. It will amaze and delight more people than you can count, and I imagine quite a lot of them won’t be kids, either. I must admit that it entertained me most of the time, but I must add that I am something of a square: It also discombobulated me.

Scheuer goes on to explain that the fantastical elements — the fact that in the film “reality is nearly nonexistent” — weren’t to his liking. 

But soon we become conscious that the feats the dancers are performing are plainly beyond human ability to accomplish. And “Oh!” we say. “Trick stuff.” In direct ratio then, our admiration for the skill of the dancers as dancers (despite its having been considerable) is dissipated in a more routine respect for what the special-effects men can do.

That seems to rather miss the point of a movie that pairs Dick Van Dyke with dancing penguins. But Scheuer has a lovely turn when he addresses the stars, Van Dyke and Julie Andrews.

It is the first movie role for Miss Andrews of the stage’s “My Fair Lady” and “Camelot,” and she plays it coyly and captivatingly. Her singing voice, of course, is liquid sweetness. And she swings a wicked soft shoe. Paired happily with her (no romance, you know, but the two seem to share a winking secret) is Dick Van Dyke as Bert, who shows up in various guises — a street musician, a chalk-pavement artist, a sport, a chimney sweep and a surprise character — without any explanation. What they have in common are Dick Van Dyke and a cockney accent.

Read the rest here: Disney Fantasy Film — Amazement and Delight, Even for Grownups, Squares (1964, “Mary Poppins” review in the Los Angeles Times)
That singing voice of “liquid sweetness” helped Andrews win the Oscar for best actress at the 37th Academy Awards — Andrews is seen above with Audrey Hepburn, who starred in 1964’s best picture, “My Fair Lady.”
— Matt Ballinger
Original published caption, April 6, 1965: TWO ‘FAIR LADIES’ — Audrey Hepburn, the film’s “My Fair Lady,” congratulates Julie Andrews, right, star of the stage version, on winning the best actress for her performance in film “Mary Poppins.” Credit: Los Angeles Times

Karen Dotrice, who played young Jane Banks, spoke to Times reporter Susan King last year about the experience, and fondly recalled the man she still refers to as “Uncle Walt” (Walt Disney, of course).
"The joy that you see on the screen is the joy we felt," Dotrice said of working on "Mary Poppins."

latimespast:

"Mary Poppins" began its "regular engagement" at the Chinese Theater 50 years ago today. When The Times reviewed it (earlier in August of 1964), Philip K. Scheuer wrote:

"Mary Poppins" is the complete fantasy. It will amaze and delight more people than you can count, and I imagine quite a lot of them won’t be kids, either. I must admit that it entertained me most of the time, but I must add that I am something of a square: It also discombobulated me.

Scheuer goes on to explain that the fantastical elements — the fact that in the film “reality is nearly nonexistent” — weren’t to his liking. 

But soon we become conscious that the feats the dancers are performing are plainly beyond human ability to accomplish. And “Oh!” we say. “Trick stuff.” In direct ratio then, our admiration for the skill of the dancers as dancers (despite its having been considerable) is dissipated in a more routine respect for what the special-effects men can do.

That seems to rather miss the point of a movie that pairs Dick Van Dyke with dancing penguins. But Scheuer has a lovely turn when he addresses the stars, Van Dyke and Julie Andrews.

It is the first movie role for Miss Andrews of the stage’s “My Fair Lady” and “Camelot,” and she plays it coyly and captivatingly. Her singing voice, of course, is liquid sweetness. And she swings a wicked soft shoe. Paired happily with her (no romance, you know, but the two seem to share a winking secret) is Dick Van Dyke as Bert, who shows up in various guises — a street musician, a chalk-pavement artist, a sport, a chimney sweep and a surprise character — without any explanation. What they have in common are Dick Van Dyke and a cockney accent.

Read the rest here: Disney Fantasy Film — Amazement and Delight, Even for Grownups, Squares (1964, “Mary Poppins” review in the Los Angeles Times)

That singing voice of “liquid sweetness” helped Andrews win the Oscar for best actress at the 37th Academy Awards — Andrews is seen above with Audrey Hepburn, who starred in 1964’s best picture, “My Fair Lady.”

Matt Ballinger

Original published caption, April 6, 1965: TWO ‘FAIR LADIES’ — Audrey Hepburn, the film’s “My Fair Lady,” congratulates Julie Andrews, right, star of the stage version, on winning the best actress for her performance in film “Mary Poppins.” Credit: Los Angeles Times

Karen Dotrice, who played young Jane Banks, spoke to Times reporter Susan King last year about the experience, and fondly recalled the man she still refers to as “Uncle Walt” (Walt Disney, of course).

"The joy that you see on the screen is the joy we felt," Dotrice said of working on "Mary Poppins."

test reblogged from latimespast

Six Missouri residents have filed a federal lawsuit alleging excessive force and false arrests by the Ferguson and St. Louis County police departments during the Ferguson protests following the shooting death of Michael Brown. The residents accuse the police of humiliating them and depriving them of their civil rights; their lawsuit seeks millions in damages for alleged abuses that took place between Aug. 11 and 13
Photo: People protest in Ferguson. Credit: Charlie Riedel / Associated Press

Six Missouri residents have filed a federal lawsuit alleging excessive force and false arrests by the Ferguson and St. Louis County police departments during the Ferguson protests following the shooting death of Michael Brown. The residents accuse the police of humiliating them and depriving them of their civil rights; their lawsuit seeks millions in damages for alleged abuses that took place between Aug. 11 and 13

Photo: People protest in Ferguson. Credit: Charlie Riedel / Associated Press