A first edition of “Das Kapital,” a landmark work by Karl Marx (who, you may have heard, was not a big fan of capitalism) sold last week for $40,000.
Photo: AbeBooks

A first edition of “Das Kapital,” a landmark work by Karl Marx (who, you may have heard, was not a big fan of capitalism) sold last week for $40,000.

Photo: AbeBooks

After decades of serving up junk food, vending machines are putting on airs. Among the things you can get from a vending machine nowadays are caviar, Sprinkles cupcakes and vegan fajita burritos. And there are more options in the works.
Photo: Francine Orr / Los Angeles Times

After decades of serving up junk food, vending machines are putting on airs. Among the things you can get from a vending machine nowadays are caviar, Sprinkles cupcakes and vegan fajita burritos. And there are more options in the works.

Photo: Francine Orr / Los Angeles Times

It’s not as if I’m mixing ‘Avatar.’ It still should sound like it’s in 1964.
All that work that chefs do to make your food look pretty? It’s not just for aesthetics – pretty food tastes better, a new study says.
Photo: Jay L. Clendenin / Los Angeles Times

All that work that chefs do to make your food look pretty? It’s not just for aesthetics – pretty food tastes better, a new study says.

Photo: Jay L. Clendenin / Los Angeles Times

latimespast:

It’s Thursday, and it’s the day before the Fourth of July, so it’s the perfect occasion for a Throwback Thursday of past Independence Day celebrations in L.A. Above, from the top, you can see fireworks in Santa Monica in 1990, friends watching fireworks near the Santa Monica Pier in 1987, fireworks over the Memorial Coliseum in 1958 and Boy Scouts and Cub Scouts holding their annual parade in 1967.

See more photos here.

Photo credits, from top: Jose Galvez / Los Angeles Times, Randy Leffingwell / Los Angeles Times, Harry Chase / Los Angeles Times, Don Cormier / Los Angeles Times

If you want to see fireworks in 2014, here’s where you can go.

test reblogged from latimespast

Tim Howard could be U.S. Defense secretary, the real Defense secretary said today.
Photo: U.S. goalkeeper Tim Howard makes a save during the team’s World Cup game against Belgium yesterday. Credit: AP / Felipe Dana

Tim Howard could be U.S. Defense secretary, the real Defense secretary said today.

Photo: U.S. goalkeeper Tim Howard makes a save during the team’s World Cup game against Belgium yesterday. Credit: AP / Felipe Dana

The U.S. lost to Belgium today, but Team USA still had "a remarkable underdog run" at the World Cup. 
Photo: AP / Michael Conroy

The U.S. lost to Belgium today, but Team USA still had "a remarkable underdog run" at the World Cup

Photo: AP / Michael Conroy

latimespast:

Has one of the old Times buildings been unearthed? A structure recently uncovered in downtown L.A. could be the basement or foundation of the old Times building that once stood at North Broadway and West 1st Street, the site of a bloody chapter in the paper’s history. 
Reporter Howard Blume writes about the 1910 bombing of the building by militant unionists: 

The paper had opened for business in a nearby location as the Los Angeles Daily Times on Dec. 4, 1881, one of a number of newspapers in the bustling town, and not widely regarded as the best — especially in the view of labor organizers. The paper was virulently anti-union in its editorial policy and practices.
In 1886, at a cost of $50,000, Col. Harrison Gray Otis opened The Times’ second building, a three-story brick and granite structure, at the site now being developed. A more compact six-story adjacent structure housed the printing plant by 1910.
At 1 a.m. on Oct. 1, 1910, a dynamite charge exploded just outside the building and nearby gas lines sparked a disastrous fire.
In the city room, three people were killed or fatally injured, according to an official exhibit in the L.A. Times Globe Lobby. Two died in the telegraph room; 16 in the linotype and composing room. Eight bodies were found at the bottom of a freight elevator shaft.
The newspaper had trouble getting the numbers to add up — various published accounts over the decades put the death toll between 20 and 30.
The newspaper did not miss a day — another paper offered the use of its presses.

Read more here.
Photo: The building that housed the Times starting in 1886 and was destroyed in the 1910 bombing. Credit: Los Angeles Times

latimespast:

Has one of the old Times buildings been unearthed? A structure recently uncovered in downtown L.A. could be the basement or foundation of the old Times building that once stood at North Broadway and West 1st Street, the site of a bloody chapter in the paper’s history. 

Reporter Howard Blume writes about the 1910 bombing of the building by militant unionists

The paper had opened for business in a nearby location as the Los Angeles Daily Times on Dec. 4, 1881, one of a number of newspapers in the bustling town, and not widely regarded as the best — especially in the view of labor organizers. The paper was virulently anti-union in its editorial policy and practices.

In 1886, at a cost of $50,000, Col. Harrison Gray Otis opened The Times’ second building, a three-story brick and granite structure, at the site now being developed. A more compact six-story adjacent structure housed the printing plant by 1910.

At 1 a.m. on Oct. 1, 1910, a dynamite charge exploded just outside the building and nearby gas lines sparked a disastrous fire.

In the city room, three people were killed or fatally injured, according to an official exhibit in the L.A. Times Globe Lobby. Two died in the telegraph room; 16 in the linotype and composing room. Eight bodies were found at the bottom of a freight elevator shaft.

The newspaper had trouble getting the numbers to add up — various published accounts over the decades put the death toll between 20 and 30.

The newspaper did not miss a day — another paper offered the use of its presses.

Read more here.

Photo: The building that housed the Times starting in 1886 and was destroyed in the 1910 bombing. Credit: Los Angeles Times

test reblogged from latimespast

Supporters of Hobby Lobby’s religious freedom argument cheered this morning’s Supreme Court ruling that said that Christian business owners with religious objections to certain forms of birth control may refuse to provide their employees with insurance coverage for contraceptives. The justices also handed down a decision that dealt a limited setback to the union movement.
The Supreme Court’s term ended today. The justices will be back on the bench in October.
Photo: AFP / Getty Images

Supporters of Hobby Lobby’s religious freedom argument cheered this morning’s Supreme Court ruling that said that Christian business owners with religious objections to certain forms of birth control may refuse to provide their employees with insurance coverage for contraceptives. The justices also handed down a decision that dealt a limited setback to the union movement.

The Supreme Court’s term ended today. The justices will be back on the bench in October.

Photo: AFP / Getty Images

This will be a high-end meal either way, but our infused entrees will cost around $10 more than a typical entree.
Do dogs smile? Do rats laugh? Do ducks mourn lost friends?
We talked to some experts, and the answers are: Yes, yes and yes.
Photo: Sydney Brink / Sedalia Democrat / AP

Do dogs smile? Do rats laugh? Do ducks mourn lost friends?

We talked to some experts, and the answers are: Yes, yes and yes.

Photo: Sydney Brink / Sedalia Democrat / AP

Colorado’s new gun control laws have been upheld by a federal judge

U.S. District Judge Marcia Krieger said the laws — expanded background checks that include private firearm sales and limiting the amount of bullets a magazine can hold — don’t infringe on 2nd Amendment rights.

The U.S. soccer team lost at the World Cup today, but it was still cause for celebration. Here’s how the team advanced even without a win or a draw.

The U.S. soccer team lost at the World Cup today, but it was still cause for celebration. Here’s how the team advanced even without a win or a draw.