"We’re in an age now where this kind of technology is expected. It gives us an opportunity to do better."
L.A. County sheriff’s deputies and other California law enforcement agencies are experimenting with body cameras as a way to provide greater accountability.
Photo: Jay L. Clendenin / Los Angeles Times

"We’re in an age now where this kind of technology is expected. It gives us an opportunity to do better."

L.A. County sheriff’s deputies and other California law enforcement agencies are experimenting with body cameras as a way to provide greater accountability.

Photo: Jay L. Clendenin / Los Angeles Times

U.S. begins airstrikes over Syria
I’ll be stressed out — I’ll write about it. It’s a good outlet. I don’t have to fight somebody and dig a deeper hole.
For generations, the people of the Four Corners region have battled the federal government over collecting and selling Native American artifacts. Then agents persuaded a local dealer to go undercover.
Operation Cerberus Action was supposed to expose a lucrative trade in stolen antiquities.
Instead, it tore a hole in a Utah town.

For generations, the people of the Four Corners region have battled the federal government over collecting and selling Native American artifacts. Then agents persuaded a local dealer to go undercover.

Operation Cerberus Action was supposed to expose a lucrative trade in stolen antiquities.

Instead, it tore a hole in a Utah town.

latimespast:

On the last weekend of summer, we hope you can appreciate this California-shaped pool. It belonged to architectural historian Charles Jencks, whose home The Times wrote about in 1986. 
"When you design a building, you’re designing it to live a good life–to personify and symbolize the good life," Jencks said. Read more. 
Photo: Ken Lubas / Los Angeles Times archive / UCLA Library

latimespast:

On the last weekend of summer, we hope you can appreciate this California-shaped pool. It belonged to architectural historian Charles Jencks, whose home The Times wrote about in 1986. 

"When you design a building, you’re designing it to live a good life–to personify and symbolize the good life," Jencks said. Read more

Photo: Ken Lubas / Los Angeles Times archive / UCLA Library

test reblogged from latimespast

I got it wrong.
Voters in Scotland have rejected independence from Britain.
Deputy First Minister Nicola Sturgeon called the result “a deep personal and political disappointment,” but told the BBC that “the country has been changed forever.”
Photo: NO ballots stacked on a table during the count at the Royal Highland Center in Edinburgh. Credit: David Cheskin / Associated Press

Voters in Scotland have rejected independence from Britain.

Deputy First Minister Nicola Sturgeon called the result “a deep personal and political disappointment,” but told the BBC that “the country has been changed forever.”

Photo: NO ballots stacked on a table during the count at the Royal Highland Center in Edinburgh. Credit: David Cheskin / Associated Press

The events in Ferguson reminded us that we cannot allow tensions, which are present in so many neighborhoods across America, to go unresolved. As law enforcement leaders, each of us has an essential obligation and a unique opportunity to ensure fairness, eliminate bias, and build community engagement.

A skylight the length of a football field will be the signature element of downtown L.A.’s New Wilshire Grand. But at what cost? 

When it was proposed, there were concerns about how it would react during an earthquake. And would it be able to support the weight of a cleaning crew?

The New Wilshire Grand will have its river of glass, but it took some maneuvering to get it approved

It is time to stop bouncing people who are mentally ill and genuinely sick between the streets and our jails. This is an unconscionable waste of human life and money.

For the ethnic Uighurs in far western China, perhaps nothing is more essential than a knife. 

Farmers use them to slice open melons that they sell on the roadside. In open-air markets, butchers slaughter sheep and cattle in accordance with Muslim practice.

A knife by the bedside is thought to keep away bad dreams. On a baby’s seventh day of life, it’s tradition for parents to briefly slip a blade under the sleeping infant’s head to guarantee a long and healthy life.

But in the wake of a string of deadly clashes and terrorist attacks, including a mass slashing, knives have taken on a deadly cast in the region.

Photos: Julie Makinen / Los Angeles Times

latimespast:

Stay cool, Los Angeles — like the people above in a 1920s-era photo from the Los Angeles Municipal Plunge.
Wherever you go to cool off, you’re unlikely to encounter the swimsuits of the 1920s. The Times reported in July 1920 about a rule requiring women’s swimsuits to have skirts — and not gauzy or see-through skirts neither!
From an article headlined What Ho! Put Skirts on Bathers:

Oh, you film bathing beauties! Likewise, a what ho! or two for the Venice mermaids, also what to tell! This is to warn you that if you would a-bathing go at any of the municipal swimming pools you must leave your gay and abbreviated bathing suits at home, for the Playground Commission, with the Council’s connivance, has issued a Puritan pool edict.
In other words, if you, this is only for feminine ears, would swim anywhere within the purlieus of Los Angeles you must hide your charms with a skirt that isn’t diaphanous.
…
"Oh, yes," said Supt. Raitt of the Department of Playgrounds, yesterday, "we are turning back young women who would bathe in the city pools in suits that — ah, ahem — we, you know — suits that would be all right perhaps at Venice or Atlantic City but — well, we cannot permit them."

Read the rest of The Times’ story about the "Puritan pool edict."
— Matt Ballinger
Photo: Bathers at Los Angeles public swimming pool the Municipal Plunge, circa 1920. Credit: Los Angeles Times / UCLA Library

This SoCal heat wave is breaking records, but we haven’t heard about any new fashion edicts yet. 

latimespast:

Stay cool, Los Angeles — like the people above in a 1920s-era photo from the Los Angeles Municipal Plunge.

Wherever you go to cool off, you’re unlikely to encounter the swimsuits of the 1920s. The Times reported in July 1920 about a rule requiring women’s swimsuits to have skirts — and not gauzy or see-through skirts neither!

From an article headlined What Ho! Put Skirts on Bathers:

Oh, you film bathing beauties! Likewise, a what ho! or two for the Venice mermaids, also what to tell! This is to warn you that if you would a-bathing go at any of the municipal swimming pools you must leave your gay and abbreviated bathing suits at home, for the Playground Commission, with the Council’s connivance, has issued a Puritan pool edict.

In other words, if you, this is only for feminine ears, would swim anywhere within the purlieus of Los Angeles you must hide your charms with a skirt that isn’t diaphanous.

"Oh, yes," said Supt. Raitt of the Department of Playgrounds, yesterday, "we are turning back young women who would bathe in the city pools in suits that — ah, ahem — we, you know — suits that would be all right perhaps at Venice or Atlantic City but — well, we cannot permit them."

Read the rest of The Times’ story about the "Puritan pool edict."

Matt Ballinger

Photo: Bathers at Los Angeles public swimming pool the Municipal Plunge, circa 1920. Credit: Los Angeles Times / UCLA Library

This SoCal heat wave is breaking records, but we haven’t heard about any new fashion edicts yet. 

test reblogged from latimespast

SpaceX, Boeing land NASA contracts for manned spaceflight
He has the ability to see the big picture and respond in an instant.