About 40% of L.A. County food trucks and carts haven’t been inspected in the field by health officials since letter grades were introduced three years ago. And most of the remaining 60% have only been inspected half as often as official guidelines specify. 
"How do I know that? Because Angelo Bellomo, director of environmental health for the county Department of Public Health, told me so. He oversees inspections of all eateries, including mobile ones," consumer columnist David Lazarus writes.
Nearly all area food trucks do get a separate annual certification inspection, but it happens at the truck’s storage site, not while it’s out serving food. The toughest part of inspecting in the field, Bellomo told Lazarus, is actually finding the trucks.
Photo: Lawrence K. Ho / Los Angeles Times

About 40% of L.A. County food trucks and carts haven’t been inspected in the field by health officials since letter grades were introduced three years ago. And most of the remaining 60% have only been inspected half as often as official guidelines specify. 

"How do I know that? Because Angelo Bellomo, director of environmental health for the county Department of Public Health, told me so. He oversees inspections of all eateries, including mobile ones," consumer columnist David Lazarus writes.

Nearly all area food trucks do get a separate annual certification inspection, but it happens at the truck’s storage site, not while it’s out serving food. The toughest part of inspecting in the field, Bellomo told Lazarus, is actually finding the trucks.

Photo: Lawrence K. Ho / Los Angeles Times

latimespast:

Disney is marking the 50th anniversary of the It’s a Small World ride at its parks around the globe today, but the attraction didn’t originally debut at any of them.
Developed by Disney “imagineers,” It’s a Small World first opened at the 1964 New York World’s Fair. It was “enjoyed by an estimated 10 million children” there in 1964 and 1965 before anyone ever rode it at Disneyland starting in 1966, according to a Times article on the ride’s debut in Anaheim.
But the Disneyland riders did experience something new: The attraction was expanded by one-third once it made the cross-country move. 
The ceremony marking the ride’s 1966 Disneyland opening sounds like a splashy affair. There were fireworks, 10,000 balloons and a flock of white doves.
Oh, and it was literally splashy: “Water from major oceans and seas around the world was flown to Disneyland, and [Walt] Disney and children from 16 Southern California ethnic groups poured it into Seven SeaWays,” The Times reported.
It’s a Small World and the teacup ride are my two earliest memories of Disneyland, a place I first visited as a 3-year-old. For Throwback Thursday, we encourage you to send your It’s a Small World memories and photos by messaging us here or tweeting them to @latimespast.
— Laura E. Davis
(Photo: Walt Disney pours water from canteen into a channel through It’s a Small World on May 30, 1966. Credit: Los Angeles Times/UCLA Library)

Happy birthday, It’s a Small World! Disney offers its own look at the ride’s resident dolls in this video:

latimespast:

Disney is marking the 50th anniversary of the It’s a Small World ride at its parks around the globe today, but the attraction didn’t originally debut at any of them.

Developed by Disney “imagineers,” It’s a Small World first opened at the 1964 New York World’s Fair. It was “enjoyed by an estimated 10 million children” there in 1964 and 1965 before anyone ever rode it at Disneyland starting in 1966, according to a Times article on the ride’s debut in Anaheim.

But the Disneyland riders did experience something new: The attraction was expanded by one-third once it made the cross-country move. 

The ceremony marking the ride’s 1966 Disneyland opening sounds like a splashy affair. There were fireworks, 10,000 balloons and a flock of white doves.

Oh, and it was literally splashy: “Water from major oceans and seas around the world was flown to Disneyland, and [Walt] Disney and children from 16 Southern California ethnic groups poured it into Seven SeaWays,” The Times reported.

It’s a Small World and the teacup ride are my two earliest memories of Disneyland, a place I first visited as a 3-year-old. For Throwback Thursday, we encourage you to send your It’s a Small World memories and photos by messaging us here or tweeting them to @latimespast.

— Laura E. Davis

(Photo: Walt Disney pours water from canteen into a channel through It’s a Small World on May 30, 1966. Credit: Los Angeles Times/UCLA Library)

Happy birthday, It’s a Small World! Disney offers its own look at the ride’s resident dolls in this video:

test reblogged from latimespast

Stephen Colbert is going to be the next host of “The Late Show.” CBS announced today that the comedian will take over after David Letterman retires next year. 
We’re wondering if he looks as excited now as he did with those two Emmys in his hands…
Photo: Lawrence K. Ho / Los Angeles Times

Stephen Colbert is going to be the next host of “The Late Show.” CBS announced today that the comedian will take over after David Letterman retires next year. 

We’re wondering if he looks as excited now as he did with those two Emmys in his hands…

Photo: Lawrence K. Ho / Los Angeles Times

The Irwindale City Council has voted unanimously to declare the smell of Sriracha hot sauce production a public nuisance.

But everybody chill - it just means a resolution will come back and they’ll have 90 days to fix the problem or the city will.
— Frank Shyong (@frankshyong)
April 10, 2014


Sriracha’s maker built its large facility in Irwindale, a city in the San Gabriel Valley, so it could increase production. (The plant can produce up to 200,000 bottles a day; here are photos of it in operation.)
The council is expected to adopt an official resolution at its next meeting; after that, the company would have about 90 days to mitigate the odor.
Photo: Cheryl A. Guerrero / McClatchy Tribune News Service

The Irwindale City Council has voted unanimously to declare the smell of Sriracha hot sauce production a public nuisance.

Sriracha’s maker built its large facility in Irwindale, a city in the San Gabriel Valley, so it could increase production. (The plant can produce up to 200,000 bottles a day; here are photos of it in operation.)

The council is expected to adopt an official resolution at its next meeting; after that, the company would have about 90 days to mitigate the odor.

Photo: Cheryl A. Guerrero / McClatchy Tribune News Service

This is a 36-million-dollar cup.
Photo: Vincent Yu / Associated Press

This is a 36-million-dollar cup.

Photo: Vincent Yu / Associated Press

latimespast:

Here’s a look at downtown Culver City, circa 1920.
Credit: Los Angeles Times / UCLA Library

At the time this photo was taken, Culver City was less than a decade old. This 1913 L.A. Times article on what was then only “as yet a ‘city on paper’” described it as “a promising urban center half way between downtown Los Angeles and the Venice oceanfront.”
Nathan Masters has more on Culver City’s history, including its self-proclaimed stint as “the Heart of Screenland,” at KCET.

latimespast:

Here’s a look at downtown Culver City, circa 1920.

Credit: Los Angeles Times / UCLA Library

At the time this photo was taken, Culver City was less than a decade old. This 1913 L.A. Times article on what was then only “as yet a ‘city on paper’” described it as “a promising urban center half way between downtown Los Angeles and the Venice oceanfront.”

Nathan Masters has more on Culver City’s history, including its self-proclaimed stint as “the Heart of Screenland,” at KCET.

test reblogged from latimespast

The Philippine Supreme Court has upheld a law guaranteeing access to birth control and sex education. 

President Benigno Aquino III signed the legislation in December 2012, but its implementation has been on hold following challenges from the Roman Catholic Church and conservative politicians who questioned its constitutionality.

Top photo: Supporters of the law celebrate in front of the court’s summer residence in Baguio City, north of Manila. Bottom photo: Opponents react to the ruling. Both photos: AFP/Getty Images

It’s not a mascot. It’s a unique performance character.


Coachella set times have been announced:

As expected, OutKast will close out the main stage Friday, while main stage headlining honors belong to Muse on Saturday and the Arcade Fire on Sunday.
The announcement came with additions. Slyly slotted amid the set times was rock act the Pixies and Strokes leader Julian Casablancas. Both were added to Saturday’s lineup.

See the schedule better on the Coachella site; our music staff’s picks for can’t-miss performances are here.

Coachella set times have been announced:

As expected, OutKast will close out the main stage Friday, while main stage headlining honors belong to Muse on Saturday and the Arcade Fire on Sunday.

The announcement came with additions. Slyly slotted amid the set times was rock act the Pixies and Strokes leader Julian Casablancas. Both were added to Saturday’s lineup.

See the schedule better on the Coachella site; our music staff’s picks for can’t-miss performances are here.

The sun emitted a mid-level solar flare on April 2, and NASA captured it in this video, which, the agency says, “shows the flare in a blend of two wavelengths of extreme ultraviolet light: 171 Angstroms and 304 Angstroms, colorized in yellow and red, respectively.”

"When I open a refrigerator door and the light goes on, I want to perform."

Mickey Rooney, one of the top Hollywood stars of the 1930s and ’40s, has died at 93. 

Rooney’s career as a performer began when he was just a toddler; high points included 15 appearances as the title character in the popular “Andy Hardy” films, a series of movie musicals with Judy Garland and a costarring role alongside a young Elizabeth Taylor in “National Velvet.” Into his 80s, he was touring in a 2-person show with his wife, Jan Chamberlin. At age 90, he testified before Congress on the issue of elder abuse, which he said he had experienced personally.

“Tennessee Williams, who knew more about actors than anybody in our time … said, ‘There’s only one great actor in the United States and that is Mickey Rooney…. He can do anything. He sings, he dances, he can make you weep. He can play tragedy, he can play comedy,’” author Gore Vidal once said.

He’s shown here watching Judy Garland put her handprints in the cement at the theater then known as Grauman’s in 1939. This photo was published in the L.A. TImes on Oct. 25, 1939.

Photo: UCLA Library / Los Angeles Times

"When I open a refrigerator door and the light goes on, I want to perform."

Mickey Rooney, one of the top Hollywood stars of the 1930s and ’40s, has died at 93.

Rooney’s career as a performer began when he was just a toddler; high points included 15 appearances as the title character in the popular “Andy Hardy” films, a series of movie musicals with Judy Garland and a costarring role alongside a young Elizabeth Taylor in “National Velvet.” Into his 80s, he was touring in a 2-person show with his wife, Jan Chamberlin. At age 90, he testified before Congress on the issue of elder abuse, which he said he had experienced personally.

“Tennessee Williams, who knew more about actors than anybody in our time … said, ‘There’s only one great actor in the United States and that is Mickey Rooney…. He can do anything. He sings, he dances, he can make you weep. He can play tragedy, he can play comedy,’” author Gore Vidal once said.

He’s shown here watching Judy Garland put her handprints in the cement at the theater then known as Grauman’s in 1939. This photo was published in the L.A. TImes on Oct. 25, 1939.

Photo: UCLA Library / Los Angeles Times

Google Maps has added Cambodia’s ancient temples of Angkor to its World Wonders Project.

It joins Stonehenge, the Grand Canyon, the architectural ruins of Pompei, Italy, and more than a dozen others.

Photo: Christophe Archambault / AFP/Getty Images

Google Maps has added Cambodia’s ancient temples of Angkor to its World Wonders Project.

It joins Stonehenge, the Grand Canyon, the architectural ruins of Pompei, Italy, and more than a dozen others.

Photo: Christophe Archambault / AFP/Getty Images

Bryan Cranston is writing a book (to be published next year). 
"With this book, I want to tell the stories of my life and reveal the secrets and lies that I lived with for six years shooting ‘Breaking Bad’," the actor said in a press release announcing his memoir.
Photo: Frank Ockenfels / AMC

Bryan Cranston is writing a book (to be published next year). 

"With this book, I want to tell the stories of my life and reveal the secrets and lies that I lived with for six years shooting ‘Breaking Bad’," the actor said in a press release announcing his memoir.

Photo: Frank Ockenfels / AMC

Fear of losing benefits keeps many military spouses from exposing sexual misconduct or other offenses committed by their partners, say many people familiar with the military criminal justice system.
"You’re advised to keep your mouth shut and let him retire because you could lose everything," Kris Johnson, whose now ex-husband, an Army colonel, pleaded guilty in 2012 to adultery, bigamy and other charges, told The Times.
Now the Pentagon is studying changes to protect families even if a member of the military is punished harshly for misconduct.
Photo: Col. James H. Johnson and then-wife Kris in Bamberg, Germany, in 2009. Photo courtesy of Kris Johnson. 

Fear of losing benefits keeps many military spouses from exposing sexual misconduct or other offenses committed by their partners, say many people familiar with the military criminal justice system.

"You’re advised to keep your mouth shut and let him retire because you could lose everything," Kris Johnson, whose now ex-husband, an Army colonel, pleaded guilty in 2012 to adultery, bigamy and other charges, told The Times.

Now the Pentagon is studying changes to protect families even if a member of the military is punished harshly for misconduct.

Photo: Col. James H. Johnson and then-wife Kris in Bamberg, Germany, in 2009. Photo courtesy of Kris Johnson. 

A new study from Cornell University’s Food and Brand Lab and Yale University finds that the characters on cereal boxes are designed to look the shoppers they’re marketed to in the eye — and when the characters appear to make eye contact, people are more likely to say they like the cereal and feel a connection to its brand. Food writer Jenn Harris reports:

The researchers evaluated 65 types of cereal and 86 different box characters from 10 grocery stores in New York and Connecticut. Each character was analyzed by the angle of its gaze, 4 feet from the shelf. This is thought to be the standard distance shoppers stand from shelves.

They found characters on boxes marketed to children made eye contact with kids at a downward angle, while boxes marketed to adults made eye contact with adult shoppers at a straight or slightly upward angle. Boxes geared toward children were placed on bottom shelves and those for adults were put on the top shelves.

"Findings show that brand trust was 16% higher and the feeling of connection to the brand was 28% higher when the rabbit made eye contact," the researchers wrote. "Furthermore, participants indicated liking Trix better, compared to another cereal, when the rabbit made eye contact." Here’s more on the study from the Cornell team.

Video: Cornell marketing professor Brian Wansink, via YouTube