Ray Rice is released by Ravens and suspended indefinitely by NFL
He is to me, and to many, the embodiment of the goodwill that our games inspire. Every day he reminds us of why this game is forever our national pastime.
latimespast:

The Times’ obituary of Joan Rivers, who died Thursday at age 81, leads with a crucial moment in her career.

In 1986, Joan Rivers made a fateful call to her mentor Johnny Carson.
Rivers, the brassy comic with the thick New York accent who had made “Can we talk?” her catchphrase, told the all-powerful host of NBC’s “The Tonight Show” that she was giving up a role as his handpicked heir to do her own show on Fox.
It was, depending on how one looked at it, a bold bid for bigger stardom — or a stunning act of betrayal. Carson’s reaction was unambiguous. According to Rivers, he hung up on her — twice — and never spoke to her again in the remaining 19 years of his life.

The Times’ report from 1986 (Rivers Set to Host Late-Night Show on Murdoch’s Independent Network) recounts those events a little differently, through a slightly more circumspect spokesman.

While Carson had no immediate comment on Rivers’ move, a spokesman for Carson said that the late-night talk-show king “was shocked and surprised to learn of it through a press release.” Rivers, at the press conference, said that she had placed two calls to Carson and that neither was returned.
The spokesman, Jim Mahoney, said that Rivers had been negotiating with Carson’s production company for a new contract and that when she appeared on the show last week “not a word was said” about her plans to work elsewhere.
"It came as a real surprise. It’s an unusual way to to business, to say the least," Mahoney added.

More on Rivers: Joan Rivers | 1933 - 2014
— Matt Ballinger
Photo: Fox Chairman Barry Diller with Joan Rivers at a press conference. Published in The Times May 7, 1986. Credit: Con Keyes / Los Angeles Times

latimespast:

The Times’ obituary of Joan Rivers, who died Thursday at age 81, leads with a crucial moment in her career.

In 1986, Joan Rivers made a fateful call to her mentor Johnny Carson.

Rivers, the brassy comic with the thick New York accent who had made “Can we talk?” her catchphrase, told the all-powerful host of NBC’s “The Tonight Show” that she was giving up a role as his handpicked heir to do her own show on Fox.

It was, depending on how one looked at it, a bold bid for bigger stardom — or a stunning act of betrayal. Carson’s reaction was unambiguous. According to Rivers, he hung up on her — twice — and never spoke to her again in the remaining 19 years of his life.

The Times’ report from 1986 (Rivers Set to Host Late-Night Show on Murdoch’s Independent Network) recounts those events a little differently, through a slightly more circumspect spokesman.

While Carson had no immediate comment on Rivers’ move, a spokesman for Carson said that the late-night talk-show king “was shocked and surprised to learn of it through a press release.” Rivers, at the press conference, said that she had placed two calls to Carson and that neither was returned.

The spokesman, Jim Mahoney, said that Rivers had been negotiating with Carson’s production company for a new contract and that when she appeared on the show last week “not a word was said” about her plans to work elsewhere.

"It came as a real surprise. It’s an unusual way to to business, to say the least," Mahoney added.

More on Rivers: Joan Rivers | 1933 - 2014

Matt Ballinger

Photo: Fox Chairman Barry Diller with Joan Rivers at a press conference. Published in The Times May 7, 1986. Credit: Con Keyes / Los Angeles Times

test reblogged from latimespast

I probably will sign it, yes.
A Great Dane in Oregon has fully recovered after having 43 ½ socks surgically removed from its stomach.
Perhaps even more astonishing: This is coming to light because the dog’s story was submitted to a “They Ate WHAT?” contest for veterinary hospitals, and it came in third. First place went to a clinic that treated a frog that had eaten more than 30 small rocks. (The frog also recovered.) You can see X-rays of the other winning entrants, and honorable mentions (including a bearded dragon that ate a small toy banana), at Veterinary Practice News.
Photos: DoveLewis Emergency Animal Hospital

A Great Dane in Oregon has fully recovered after having 43 ½ socks surgically removed from its stomach.

Perhaps even more astonishing: This is coming to light because the dog’s story was submitted to a “They Ate WHAT?” contest for veterinary hospitals, and it came in third. First place went to a clinic that treated a frog that had eaten more than 30 small rocks. (The frog also recovered.) You can see X-rays of the other winning entrants, and honorable mentions (including a bearded dragon that ate a small toy banana), at Veterinary Practice News.

Photos: DoveLewis Emergency Animal Hospital

With three plane diversions in nine days caused by passenger fights over shrinking legroom, here’s a look at the airlines with the most and least legroom in economy. Spirit Airlines has the least legroom in the industry — and the highest profit margin.

With three plane diversions in nine days caused by passenger fights over shrinking legroom, here’s a look at the airlines with the most and least legroom in economy. Spirit Airlines has the least legroom in the industry — and the highest profit margin.

There is a window of opportunity to tamp this down, but that window is closing. We need action now.
Video purports to show Islamic State beheading another U.S. journalist
latimespast:

"There must have been 50,000 marchers" in the 1937 Labor Day parade in downtown Los Angeles, according to Secretary J. W. Buzzell of Central Labor Council.
For years, major parades were held in downtown L.A. to mark the holiday. See some of them here, and read more about 1937’s celebration.
Photo: Los Angeles Times archive / UCLA

On this Labor Day, columnist Jim Newton gives an assessment of L.A.’s economic outlook. 

latimespast:

"There must have been 50,000 marchers" in the 1937 Labor Day parade in downtown Los Angeles, according to Secretary J. W. Buzzell of Central Labor Council.

For years, major parades were held in downtown L.A. to mark the holiday. See some of them here, and read more about 1937’s celebration.

Photo: Los Angeles Times archive / UCLA

On this Labor Day, columnist Jim Newton gives an assessment of L.A.’s economic outlook

test reblogged from latimespast