The sun emitted a mid-level solar flare on April 2, and NASA captured it in this video, which, the agency says, “shows the flare in a blend of two wavelengths of extreme ultraviolet light: 171 Angstroms and 304 Angstroms, colorized in yellow and red, respectively.”

"When I open a refrigerator door and the light goes on, I want to perform."

Mickey Rooney, one of the top Hollywood stars of the 1930s and ’40s, has died at 93. 

Rooney’s career as a performer began when he was just a toddler; high points included 15 appearances as the title character in the popular “Andy Hardy” films, a series of movie musicals with Judy Garland and a costarring role alongside a young Elizabeth Taylor in “National Velvet.” Into his 80s, he was touring in a 2-person show with his wife, Jan Chamberlin. At age 90, he testified before Congress on the issue of elder abuse, which he said he had experienced personally.

“Tennessee Williams, who knew more about actors than anybody in our time … said, ‘There’s only one great actor in the United States and that is Mickey Rooney…. He can do anything. He sings, he dances, he can make you weep. He can play tragedy, he can play comedy,’” author Gore Vidal once said.

He’s shown here watching Judy Garland put her handprints in the cement at the theater then known as Grauman’s in 1939. This photo was published in the L.A. TImes on Oct. 25, 1939.

Photo: UCLA Library / Los Angeles Times

"When I open a refrigerator door and the light goes on, I want to perform."

Mickey Rooney, one of the top Hollywood stars of the 1930s and ’40s, has died at 93.

Rooney’s career as a performer began when he was just a toddler; high points included 15 appearances as the title character in the popular “Andy Hardy” films, a series of movie musicals with Judy Garland and a costarring role alongside a young Elizabeth Taylor in “National Velvet.” Into his 80s, he was touring in a 2-person show with his wife, Jan Chamberlin. At age 90, he testified before Congress on the issue of elder abuse, which he said he had experienced personally.

“Tennessee Williams, who knew more about actors than anybody in our time … said, ‘There’s only one great actor in the United States and that is Mickey Rooney…. He can do anything. He sings, he dances, he can make you weep. He can play tragedy, he can play comedy,’” author Gore Vidal once said.

He’s shown here watching Judy Garland put her handprints in the cement at the theater then known as Grauman’s in 1939. This photo was published in the L.A. TImes on Oct. 25, 1939.

Photo: UCLA Library / Los Angeles Times

Google Maps has added Cambodia’s ancient temples of Angkor to its World Wonders Project.

It joins Stonehenge, the Grand Canyon, the architectural ruins of Pompei, Italy, and more than a dozen others.

Photo: Christophe Archambault / AFP/Getty Images

Google Maps has added Cambodia’s ancient temples of Angkor to its World Wonders Project.

It joins Stonehenge, the Grand Canyon, the architectural ruins of Pompei, Italy, and more than a dozen others.

Photo: Christophe Archambault / AFP/Getty Images

Bryan Cranston is writing a book (to be published next year). 
"With this book, I want to tell the stories of my life and reveal the secrets and lies that I lived with for six years shooting ‘Breaking Bad’," the actor said in a press release announcing his memoir.
Photo: Frank Ockenfels / AMC

Bryan Cranston is writing a book (to be published next year). 

"With this book, I want to tell the stories of my life and reveal the secrets and lies that I lived with for six years shooting ‘Breaking Bad’," the actor said in a press release announcing his memoir.

Photo: Frank Ockenfels / AMC

Fear of losing benefits keeps many military spouses from exposing sexual misconduct or other offenses committed by their partners, say many people familiar with the military criminal justice system.
"You’re advised to keep your mouth shut and let him retire because you could lose everything," Kris Johnson, whose now ex-husband, an Army colonel, pleaded guilty in 2012 to adultery, bigamy and other charges, told The Times.
Now the Pentagon is studying changes to protect families even if a member of the military is punished harshly for misconduct.
Photo: Col. James H. Johnson and then-wife Kris in Bamberg, Germany, in 2009. Photo courtesy of Kris Johnson. 

Fear of losing benefits keeps many military spouses from exposing sexual misconduct or other offenses committed by their partners, say many people familiar with the military criminal justice system.

"You’re advised to keep your mouth shut and let him retire because you could lose everything," Kris Johnson, whose now ex-husband, an Army colonel, pleaded guilty in 2012 to adultery, bigamy and other charges, told The Times.

Now the Pentagon is studying changes to protect families even if a member of the military is punished harshly for misconduct.

Photo: Col. James H. Johnson and then-wife Kris in Bamberg, Germany, in 2009. Photo courtesy of Kris Johnson. 

A new study from Cornell University’s Food and Brand Lab and Yale University finds that the characters on cereal boxes are designed to look the shoppers they’re marketed to in the eye — and when the characters appear to make eye contact, people are more likely to say they like the cereal and feel a connection to its brand. Food writer Jenn Harris reports:

The researchers evaluated 65 types of cereal and 86 different box characters from 10 grocery stores in New York and Connecticut. Each character was analyzed by the angle of its gaze, 4 feet from the shelf. This is thought to be the standard distance shoppers stand from shelves.

They found characters on boxes marketed to children made eye contact with kids at a downward angle, while boxes marketed to adults made eye contact with adult shoppers at a straight or slightly upward angle. Boxes geared toward children were placed on bottom shelves and those for adults were put on the top shelves.

"Findings show that brand trust was 16% higher and the feeling of connection to the brand was 28% higher when the rabbit made eye contact," the researchers wrote. "Furthermore, participants indicated liking Trix better, compared to another cereal, when the rabbit made eye contact." Here’s more on the study from the Cornell team.

Video: Cornell marketing professor Brian Wansink, via YouTube

latimespast:

Downtown Los Angeles, 70 years ago: This is the intersection of Broadway and 7th as it looked in 1943.
Photo: UCLA Library / Los Angeles Times

PSA: L.A. Times Past is our Tumblr for vintage photography, news coverage, advertising and more from The Times’ 132-year history (also on Twitter @latimespast).

latimespast:

Downtown Los Angeles, 70 years ago: This is the intersection of Broadway and 7th as it looked in 1943.

Photo: UCLA Library / Los Angeles Times

PSA: L.A. Times Past is our Tumblr for vintage photography, news coverage, advertising and more from The Times’ 132-year history (also on Twitter @latimespast).

test reblogged from latimespast

"Truly, he was one of the sickest dogs I’ve ever seen," L.A. dog rescuer Annie Hart of the Bill Foundation says of Gideon, a pit bull who was abandoned near the Coachella desert. Reporter Anh Do tells the story of Gideon’s rescue, rehabilitation and subsequent brush with Internet fame (the video above has been viewed more than 830,000 times so far) in The Times today:

The pit bull’s road to recovery has been long and involved after suffering from a highly resistant bacterial infection, as well as ringworm — a skin infection caused by a fungus, affecting his face, paws and nails, according to Dr. Annie Harvilicz, owner of Animal Wellness Centers in Marina del Rey, who’s been treating the pit bull.

She believes the dog contracted the illness living in a junkyard, where Hart found him, sporting deep lacerations around his neck, typical of dogs tied up over a long period.

“Some dogs who are hurt or fearful would bite or show aggression. But from the start, Gideon was the opposite. He would actually be very loving, wanting to cuddle up with you,” said Harvilicz, whose clinic has a nonprofit, the Animal Wellness Foundation, funding the dog’s medical care.

Of note about Gideon’s story: His rescuer had him scanned for a microchip (an important thing to remember if you find a lost pet!) and learned that he did indeed have one. But when the owner listed in the microchip registry was notified that he’d been found, “[t]hey told me, ‘We don’t want him anymore,’ and hung up,” Hart recalls.

While Gideon has thousands of fans, he doesn’t yet have a permanent home. He’s currently in foster care and will be ready to be adopted once he’s fully recovered.

David Letterman is leaving the”Late Show” next year. Tom Keaney, a spokesman for Letterman’s production company, Worldwide Pants, confirmed the rumor’s accuracy today. Earlier, in front of a “Late Show” audience, Letterman said he had called CBS chief executive Les Moonves to say he would be retiring.

"I just want to reiterate my thanks for the support from the network, all of the people who have worked here, all of the people in the theater, all the people on the staff, everybody at home, thank you very much," Letterman said. "What this means now, is that Paul and I can be married."

Photo: Letterman in 2011. Credit: Dimitrious Kambouris / Getty Images

David Letterman is leaving the”Late Show” next year. Tom Keaney, a spokesman for Letterman’s production company, Worldwide Pants, confirmed the rumor’s accuracy today. Earlier, in front of a “Late Show” audience, Letterman said he had called CBS chief executive Les Moonves to say he would be retiring.

"I just want to reiterate my thanks for the support from the network, all of the people who have worked here, all of the people in the theater, all the people on the staff, everybody at home, thank you very much," Letterman said. "What this means now, is that Paul and I can be married."

Photo: Letterman in 2011. Credit: Dimitrious Kambouris / Getty Images

I like to think that I’ve helped to bring sexy back to the accordion.
Mississippi has one of the highest teen pregnancy rates in the country; a third of all babies born in the state are to teenage mothers.
Alarmed by the high poverty and low education rates associated with teen pregnancy, the business community pushed the Legislature to pass a bill requiring school districts to implement sex education. But parts of the law designed to appease conservatives in the deeply religious state have made things difficult for those who want to teach about safe sex.
"The majority of high school students in Mississippi have sex before they graduate," says Dora Chen, a former Oxford High School student now attending Princeton University. While at Oxford High, Chen was editor of the school newspaper when it ran a story about sex education that featured a pregnant classmate. At a school board meeting after the story was published, Chen endorsed so-called "abstinence-plus" sex-ed programs, which urge abstinence but also teach about contraception, as opposed to abstinence-only. "To me, if we just do abstinence-only, we’re really sort of ignoring the large majority of students in Mississippi."

Mississippi has one of the highest teen pregnancy rates in the country; a third of all babies born in the state are to teenage mothers.

Alarmed by the high poverty and low education rates associated with teen pregnancy, the business community pushed the Legislature to pass a bill requiring school districts to implement sex education. But parts of the law designed to appease conservatives in the deeply religious state have made things difficult for those who want to teach about safe sex.

"The majority of high school students in Mississippi have sex before they graduate," says Dora Chen, a former Oxford High School student now attending Princeton University. While at Oxford High, Chen was editor of the school newspaper when it ran a story about sex education that featured a pregnant classmate. At a school board meeting after the story was published, Chen endorsed so-called "abstinence-plus" sex-ed programs, which urge abstinence but also teach about contraception, as opposed to abstinence-only. "To me, if we just do abstinence-only, we’re really sort of ignoring the large majority of students in Mississippi."

A bilingual Mass was held yesterday at the border fence between Arizona and Mexico in memory of those who entered the U.S. illegally and died crossing the desert. 

The Mass was an attempt by the Catholic Church to call on President Obama to use his executive powers to limit deportations of people who are in the country illegally, reporter Cindy Carcamo writes.

Photos: Cindy Carcamo / Los Angeles Times

L.A. Unified School District students throw out at least $100,000 worth of food a day — and probably far more, according to estimates by the district’s food services director. That amounts to $18 million a year, based on a conservative estimate.
Under federal school meal rules, students have to take at least three items — including a fruit or vegetable — even if they don’t want them. Otherwise, the federal government won’t reimburse school districts for the meals.
Photo: Gina Ferazzi / Los Angeles Times

L.A. Unified School District students throw out at least $100,000 worth of food a day — and probably far more, according to estimates by the district’s food services director. That amounts to $18 million a year, based on a conservative estimate.

Under federal school meal rules, students have to take at least three items — including a fruit or vegetable — even if they don’t want them. Otherwise, the federal government won’t reimburse school districts for the meals.

Photo: Gina Ferazzi / Los Angeles Times

Nobody on this planet is going to be untouched by the impacts of climate change.

March 31 is Cesar Chavez’s birthday, and three states, including California, officially recognize Cesar Chavez Day as a holiday. Here’s a photographic look at the life and work of the late activist, whose campaign to organize farm workers still inspires.

Top photo: Chavez speaks to members of the United Farm Workers during a rally in the Imperial Valley on Feb. 2, 1979. Credit: Steve Fontanini / Los Angeles Times. Bottom photo: Chavez speaks at the United Farm Workers political endorsement conference in Los Angeles on Sept. 7, 1980. The conference endorsed Jimmy Carter. Credit: Los Angeles Times.