The hands-up — a sign of surrender and submission black men and boys in Ferguson, Mo., say they learn early on when dealing with police — has been transformed into a different kind of weapon in the wake of the fatal shooting of Michael Brown, a black teenager who was unarmed when he was shot by a police officer. Reporter Matt Pearce is in Ferguson and documents how protesters are using the gesture as a symbol of defiance. 
Photo: Matt Pearce / Los Angeles Times

The hands-up — a sign of surrender and submission black men and boys in Ferguson, Mo., say they learn early on when dealing with police — has been transformed into a different kind of weapon in the wake of the fatal shooting of Michael Brown, a black teenager who was unarmed when he was shot by a police officer. Reporter Matt Pearce is in Ferguson and documents how protesters are using the gesture as a symbol of defiance

Photo: Matt Pearce / Los Angeles Times

latimespast:

Los Angeles International Airport, October 1947: Lauren Bacall, who died Tuesday at 89, with her husband, Humphrey Bogart, and other stars get ready to fly to Washington, D.C., to protest the House Un-American Activities Committee’s investigation of Hollywood Communism.
They said the Congressional inquiry — which was long on allegations but short on evidence — used “un-American tactics.” Read the story: Screen Stars Fly to Protest Inquiry on Reds
The page on which that story and another on Hollywood Communism (“Name Red Films, Industry Demands”) appears is full of journalism gems. A sampling of headlines:
British Army to Quit Iraq
Wary Princess to Compromise on Skirt Style
Slain Dry Era Gang Chief Given Flamboyant Burial
These Car Thieves Better Get Going
Idaho Senator Begins ‘Paul Revere’ Ride East
More on Bacall:
Lauren Bacall | 1924-2014
— Matt Ballinger
Original published photo caption, Oct. 27, 1947: THEY PROTEST— Part of a group of 25 film actors who flew to Washington to protest the manner in which the Un-American Activities Committee hearing is being conducted, get tickets at Los Angeles Airport from Passenger Agent Barbara Hughes. Front row, left to right, June Havoc, Marsha Hunt, Humphrey Bogart, Lauren Bacall, Evelyn Keyes and Paul Henreid. In rear, behind Marsha Hunt, is Comedian Danny Kaye. Credit: Times Photo

latimespast:

Los Angeles International Airport, October 1947: Lauren Bacall, who died Tuesday at 89, with her husband, Humphrey Bogart, and other stars get ready to fly to Washington, D.C., to protest the House Un-American Activities Committee’s investigation of Hollywood Communism.

They said the Congressional inquiry — which was long on allegations but short on evidence — used “un-American tactics.” Read the story: Screen Stars Fly to Protest Inquiry on Reds

The page on which that story and another on Hollywood Communism (“Name Red Films, Industry Demands”) appears is full of journalism gems. A sampling of headlines:

British Army to Quit Iraq

Wary Princess to Compromise on Skirt Style

Slain Dry Era Gang Chief Given Flamboyant Burial

These Car Thieves Better Get Going

Idaho Senator Begins ‘Paul Revere’ Ride East

More on Bacall:

Lauren Bacall | 1924-2014

Matt Ballinger

Original published photo caption, Oct. 27, 1947: THEY PROTEST— Part of a group of 25 film actors who flew to Washington to protest the manner in which the Un-American Activities Committee hearing is being conducted, get tickets at Los Angeles Airport from Passenger Agent Barbara Hughes. Front row, left to right, June Havoc, Marsha Hunt, Humphrey Bogart, Lauren Bacall, Evelyn Keyes and Paul Henreid. In rear, behind Marsha Hunt, is Comedian Danny Kaye. Credit: Times Photo

test reblogged from latimespast

Although his footprints will no longer be walking on the Earth, his imprints will still be there in so many people’s lives.
You don’t have it until the money has transferred to the sellers’ accounts. When that happened, I said, ‘Darn, I guess we are done.’

Actress Lauren Bacall, who starred in such films as ”The Big Sleep,” “Key Largo,” “To Have and Have Not,” “How to Marry a Millionaire” and “Designing Woman,” has died at age 89, according to the estate of her late husband, Humphrey Bogart. More on her life and career.

First photo: Bogart and Bacall arrive at L.A.’s Union Station after marrying in Ohio in 1945. Credit: Los Angeles Times. Second photo: Bogart and Bacall at the 1952 Academy Awards. Credit: Los Angeles Times. Third photo: Bogart and Bacall arriving at the 1955 Academy Awards. Credit: Los Angeles Times. Fourth photo: Bogart, Bacall and their son Stephen before departing for Honolulu from LAX. Credit: Los Angeles Times

latimespast:

As Robin Williams is mourned around the world, let’s look back to 1978, when he burst into stardom on TV’s “Mork and Mindy.”
From The Times’ September 1978 review:

Give the show a chance. You’re in for a surprise. Tonight’s episode is nothing less than uproarious. …
The reason can be summed up in two words: Robin Williams. He plays Mork from the planet Ork and he’s fantastic — wild, inventive, unpredictable. He’s a major comedic talent with an arsenal that includes crazy voices, credible imitations, excellent timing and a zany spontaneity that makes him refreshing an immensely likable.

Read the rest of the review (it’s at the bottom of a column of TV reviews and jumps to a second page).
Here’s The Times’ full coverage of Williams’ death: Robin Williams | 1951-2014
— Matt Ballinger
Photo: Robin Williams performs at the Universal Amphitheater in Los Angeles on July 1, 1979. Credit: Tony Barnard / Los Angeles Times

latimespast:

As Robin Williams is mourned around the world, let’s look back to 1978, when he burst into stardom on TV’s “Mork and Mindy.”

From The Times’ September 1978 review:

Give the show a chance. You’re in for a surprise. Tonight’s episode is nothing less than uproarious. …

The reason can be summed up in two words: Robin Williams. He plays Mork from the planet Ork and he’s fantastic — wild, inventive, unpredictable. He’s a major comedic talent with an arsenal that includes crazy voices, credible imitations, excellent timing and a zany spontaneity that makes him refreshing an immensely likable.

Read the rest of the review (it’s at the bottom of a column of TV reviews and jumps to a second page).

Here’s The Times’ full coverage of Williams’ death: Robin Williams | 1951-2014

Matt Ballinger

Photo: Robin Williams performs at the Universal Amphitheater in Los Angeles on July 1, 1979. Credit: Tony Barnard / Los Angeles Times

test reblogged from latimespast

Steve Ballmer is officially the new owner of the Clippers, NBA says.

The transaction ends a fractious period of nearly four months in which embattled owner Donald Sterling fought to retain control of the team he had presided over for three decades. A judge affirmed the right of Shelly Sterling, Donald’s estranged wife, to wrest control of the team from her husband and sell it to Ballmer.

PSA: A six-story duck is coming to the L.A. area.
Photo: Wu Hong / European Pressphoto Agency

PSA: A six-story duck is coming to the L.A. area.

Photo: Wu Hong / European Pressphoto Agency

Robin Williams was an airman, a doctor, a genie, a nanny, a president, a professor, a bangarang Peter Pan, and everything in between. But he was one of a kind. He arrived in our lives as an alien — but he ended up touching every element of the human spirit.
It’s hard because people want to know you’re a certain thing… He’s the little manic guy who played the really quiet guy and then the really scary guy. Oh, no, wait…
Robin Williams has died at age 63 of an apparent suicide.
Photo: Ken Hivley / Los Angeles Times

Robin Williams has died at age 63 of an apparent suicide.

Photo: Ken Hivley / Los Angeles Times

L.A.’s Wilshire Grand skyscraper will one day be the tallest building west of Chicago. But before it could get off the ground, someone had to make sure that ground was solid. Here’s the story of how the project was born.

L.A.’s Wilshire Grand skyscraper will one day be the tallest building west of Chicago. But before it could get off the ground, someone had to make sure that ground was solid. Here’s the story of how the project was born.

People buying homes in a development in Brea have the option of including a 170-square-foot “pet suite.” The suite includes a tiled washing station with leash tie-downs and a hand-held sprayer, a pet dryer, a cabinet with built-in bedding, a stackable washer/dryer combo (separate from the human laundry room), a flat-screen TV and a patio door that opens to a dog run.

Photo: Dogs check out a “pet suite” in Brea. (Mark Boster / Los Angeles Times)

latimespast:

Richard Nixon resigned the presidency 40 years ago today (after a televised announcement the night before), boarded a plane with his wife, and came home to Southern California. Throngs of supporters greeted them at what was then El Toro air station in Orange County.

More on Watergate and the resignation of Richard Nixon:

Photos: Nixon resigns, returns home to California

Op-Ed: Think Obama should be tougher? Then think about Nixon.

Review: ‘Dick Cavett’s Watergate’ a showcase of TV host’s tenacity

Nixon reframes Watergate scandal in rereleased 1983 interviews

Matt Ballinger

Photos: (top) Richard M. Nixon and wife, Pat, after arrival at El Toro air station from Washington. (Bottom) Part of a crowd of 5,000 flag-waving and singing supporters who greeted Richard M. Nixon. This photo was published in the Aug. 10, 1974, Los Angeles Times. Credit: Larry Anderson / Los Angeles Times

test reblogged from latimespast