For the ethnic Uighurs in far western China, perhaps nothing is more essential than a knife. 

Farmers use them to slice open melons that they sell on the roadside. In open-air markets, butchers slaughter sheep and cattle in accordance with Muslim practice.

A knife by the bedside is thought to keep away bad dreams. On a baby’s seventh day of life, it’s tradition for parents to briefly slip a blade under the sleeping infant’s head to guarantee a long and healthy life.

But in the wake of a string of deadly clashes and terrorist attacks, including a mass slashing, knives have taken on a deadly cast in the region.

Photos: Julie Makinen / Los Angeles Times

latimespast:

Stay cool, Los Angeles — like the people above in a 1920s-era photo from the Los Angeles Municipal Plunge.
Wherever you go to cool off, you’re unlikely to encounter the swimsuits of the 1920s. The Times reported in July 1920 about a rule requiring women’s swimsuits to have skirts — and not gauzy or see-through skirts neither!
From an article headlined What Ho! Put Skirts on Bathers:

Oh, you film bathing beauties! Likewise, a what ho! or two for the Venice mermaids, also what to tell! This is to warn you that if you would a-bathing go at any of the municipal swimming pools you must leave your gay and abbreviated bathing suits at home, for the Playground Commission, with the Council’s connivance, has issued a Puritan pool edict.
In other words, if you, this is only for feminine ears, would swim anywhere within the purlieus of Los Angeles you must hide your charms with a skirt that isn’t diaphanous.
…
"Oh, yes," said Supt. Raitt of the Department of Playgrounds, yesterday, "we are turning back young women who would bathe in the city pools in suits that — ah, ahem — we, you know — suits that would be all right perhaps at Venice or Atlantic City but — well, we cannot permit them."

Read the rest of The Times’ story about the "Puritan pool edict."
— Matt Ballinger
Photo: Bathers at Los Angeles public swimming pool the Municipal Plunge, circa 1920. Credit: Los Angeles Times / UCLA Library

This SoCal heat wave is breaking records, but we haven’t heard about any new fashion edicts yet. 

latimespast:

Stay cool, Los Angeles — like the people above in a 1920s-era photo from the Los Angeles Municipal Plunge.

Wherever you go to cool off, you’re unlikely to encounter the swimsuits of the 1920s. The Times reported in July 1920 about a rule requiring women’s swimsuits to have skirts — and not gauzy or see-through skirts neither!

From an article headlined What Ho! Put Skirts on Bathers:

Oh, you film bathing beauties! Likewise, a what ho! or two for the Venice mermaids, also what to tell! This is to warn you that if you would a-bathing go at any of the municipal swimming pools you must leave your gay and abbreviated bathing suits at home, for the Playground Commission, with the Council’s connivance, has issued a Puritan pool edict.

In other words, if you, this is only for feminine ears, would swim anywhere within the purlieus of Los Angeles you must hide your charms with a skirt that isn’t diaphanous.

"Oh, yes," said Supt. Raitt of the Department of Playgrounds, yesterday, "we are turning back young women who would bathe in the city pools in suits that — ah, ahem — we, you know — suits that would be all right perhaps at Venice or Atlantic City but — well, we cannot permit them."

Read the rest of The Times’ story about the "Puritan pool edict."

Matt Ballinger

Photo: Bathers at Los Angeles public swimming pool the Municipal Plunge, circa 1920. Credit: Los Angeles Times / UCLA Library

This SoCal heat wave is breaking records, but we haven’t heard about any new fashion edicts yet. 

test reblogged from latimespast

SpaceX, Boeing land NASA contracts for manned spaceflight
He has the ability to see the big picture and respond in an instant.
President Obama awarded the Medal of Honor to two Vietnam War soldiers today. “Sometimes even the most extraordinary stories can get lost in the fog of war or the passage of time,” the president said, noting that the medal is typically awarded within a few years of the acts of bravery. Above you can see which recent wars the recipients of the medal fought in.

President Obama awarded the Medal of Honor to two Vietnam War soldiers today. “Sometimes even the most extraordinary stories can get lost in the fog of war or the passage of time,” the president said, noting that the medal is typically awarded within a few years of the acts of bravery. Above you can see which recent wars the recipients of the medal fought in.

Repurposed parking meters in Pasadena are collecting change for nonprofits that serve the homeless. Pasadena is the first city in L.A. County to try the donation meters, which are supposed to raise awareness for the city’s homeless programs.
Photo: Ricardo DeAratanha / Los Angeles Times

Repurposed parking meters in Pasadena are collecting change for nonprofits that serve the homeless. Pasadena is the first city in L.A. County to try the donation meters, which are supposed to raise awareness for the city’s homeless programs.

Photo: Ricardo DeAratanha / Los Angeles Times

Netropolitan is designed to be the place to talk about your last European vacation or new car without the backlash.
latimespast:

This weekend marks the 200th anniversary of “The Star-Spangled Banner” — the poem written in 1814 that in 1931 became the United States’ official national anthem. 
On March 3, 1931, Congress sent its bill to make the song the official anthem to President Hoover. See The Times’ coverage of that here: National Hymn Bill Approved. Alas, The Times was not around to cover the War of 1812.
Above, that banner yet waves over Griffith Park in 1934.
And for more history about “The Star-Spangled Banner,” read staff writer Michael Muskal: 'Star-Spangled Banner': Anthem was once a song of drinking and sex
— Matt Ballinger
Photo: Dr. Frederick C. Leonard speaks at the dedication ceremony for the Astronomers Monument at Griffith Park, Los Angeles, 1934. Credit: Los Angeles Times / UCLA Library

latimespast:

This weekend marks the 200th anniversary of “The Star-Spangled Banner” — the poem written in 1814 that in 1931 became the United States’ official national anthem. 

On March 3, 1931, Congress sent its bill to make the song the official anthem to President Hoover. See The Times’ coverage of that here: National Hymn Bill Approved. Alas, The Times was not around to cover the War of 1812.

Above, that banner yet waves over Griffith Park in 1934.

And for more history about “The Star-Spangled Banner,” read staff writer Michael Muskal: 'Star-Spangled Banner': Anthem was once a song of drinking and sex

Matt Ballinger

Photo: Dr. Frederick C. Leonard speaks at the dedication ceremony for the Astronomers Monument at Griffith Park, Los Angeles, 1934. Credit: Los Angeles Times / UCLA Library

test reblogged from latimespast

We’re getting a visit from the Stanley Cup today.

Arnold Schwarzenegger’s official gubernatorial portrait was unveiled this week in Sacramento, with a slight modification from its original design: In it, he was once depicted wearing a lapel pin that bore the image of his now-former wife, Maria Shriver.
There’s a smudge where the pin used to be now.
Photo: Schwarzenegger poses with the portrait after it was unveiled at the Capitol in Sacramento on Sept. 8. Credit: Rich Pedroncelli / Associated Press

Arnold Schwarzenegger’s official gubernatorial portrait was unveiled this week in Sacramento, with a slight modification from its original design: In it, he was once depicted wearing a lapel pin that bore the image of his now-former wife, Maria Shriver.

There’s a smudge where the pin used to be now.

Photo: Schwarzenegger poses with the portrait after it was unveiled at the Capitol in Sacramento on Sept. 8. Credit: Rich Pedroncelli / Associated Press

More than 1,400 people have been executed in the United States since the Supreme Court ruled that the death penalty was constitutional in 1976. Here are a few key facts about capital punishment in the U.S.

More than 1,400 people have been executed in the United States since the Supreme Court ruled that the death penalty was constitutional in 1976. Here are a few key facts about capital punishment in the U.S.

A 23,000-square-foot home in Beverly Hills that’s on the market for $85 million has plenty of room to show off your cars and your M&Ms.

Photos courtesy of Simon Berlyn.

A thunderstorm Monday night had cleared the air over Manhattan and the sunlight of a warm September morning was glinting off the Hudson River as the business day began in the city’s highest buildings.