There is now compelling evidence on the growing risk of marijuana-associated adverse cardiovascular effects, especially in young people.
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It’s not a duck. Turns out the “bio-duck” sound — a heretofore mysterious noise first heard in the 1960s by submarine personnel and subsequently recorded all over the Southern Ocean — is actually made by minke whales.

Audio by Denise Risch, Northeast Fisheries Science Center / National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Since 2004, the amount of money owed by U.S. college graduates entering the workforce has more than tripled. 
Graphic: Doug Stevens / Los Angeles Times

Since 2004, the amount of money owed by U.S. college graduates entering the workforce has more than tripled

Graphic: Doug Stevens / Los Angeles Times

We don’t own the moon! We don’t need a national park on the moon even if we did.
What will Earth look like in 250 million years? For Earth Day, NASA released an image of what our planet looks like now, but the agency isn’t suggesting it will stay that way. 
There are a few theories about what might happen. In one scenario, the continents merge again, creating what’s been dubbed “Pangea Ultima” — picture above. Then there’s the idea of “Amasia,” a supercontinent that would occur at the top of the Earth.  
Depiction of Pangea Ultima by L.A. Times graphics artist Raoul Ranoa.

What will Earth look like in 250 million years? For Earth Day, NASA released an image of what our planet looks like now, but the agency isn’t suggesting it will stay that way. 

There are a few theories about what might happen. In one scenario, the continents merge again, creating what’s been dubbed “Pangea Ultima” — picture above. Then there’s the idea of “Amasia,” a supercontinent that would occur at the top of the Earth.  

Depiction of Pangea Ultima by L.A. Times graphics artist Raoul Ranoa.

PSA: Starting at 5 p.m. Pacific, the astronomy website Slooh.com will live-stream video of the annual Lyrid meteor shower, which peaks tonight.

This is P-22, a mountain lion who has been living in L.A.’s Griffith Park for about two years. When Times reporter Martha Groves wrote about him in October, he was a healthy animal. The photo above was taken in March, after he’d been captured so he could be treated for mange. (Scientists learned he had the condition thanks to an image taken by a remote camera.)
After he was captured, P-22 was sedated and blood samples were taken; they showed evidence of exposure to rat poison. From Groves’ latest report:

Now, researchers say they suspect a link between the poisons and the mange, a parasitic skin disease that causes crusting and skin lesions and has contributed to the deaths of scores of bobcats and coyotes. A National Park Service biologist applied a topical treatment for mange and injected Vitamin K to offset the effects of poisoning.
The condition of California’s famous cougar is likely to intensify the debate over the use of rat poisons in areas of the state where urban living collides with nature.

There have been efforts to discourage the use of so-called “second-generation” rodenticides in California, and recently the state’s Department of Pesticide Regulation moved to disallow their sale to the general public. But P-22 was afflicted by two older “first-generation” rat poisons, Groves notes.
Below, P-22 in happier times:

Photo: National Park Service. Video: Los Angeles Times

This is P-22, a mountain lion who has been living in L.A.’s Griffith Park for about two years. When Times reporter Martha Groves wrote about him in October, he was a healthy animal. The photo above was taken in March, after he’d been captured so he could be treated for mange. (Scientists learned he had the condition thanks to an image taken by a remote camera.)

After he was captured, P-22 was sedated and blood samples were taken; they showed evidence of exposure to rat poison. From Groves’ latest report:

Now, researchers say they suspect a link between the poisons and the mange, a parasitic skin disease that causes crusting and skin lesions and has contributed to the deaths of scores of bobcats and coyotes. A National Park Service biologist applied a topical treatment for mange and injected Vitamin K to offset the effects of poisoning.

The condition of California’s famous cougar is likely to intensify the debate over the use of rat poisons in areas of the state where urban living collides with nature.

There have been efforts to discourage the use of so-called “second-generation” rodenticides in California, and recently the state’s Department of Pesticide Regulation moved to disallow their sale to the general public. But P-22 was afflicted by two older “first-generation” rat poisons, Groves notes.

Below, P-22 in happier times:

Photo: National Park Service. Video: Los Angeles Times

American Meb Keflezighi won the men’s division of the Boston Marathon today. Rita Jeptoo of Kenya won the women’s.

Keflezighi is the first American man to win the race since 1983. Jeptoo captured back-to-back championships and became the seventh woman to win three marathon crowns.

As the winners crossed the finish, they were cheered on by spectators, many in yellow and blue “Boston Strong” T-shirts, who came to watch the race a year after a pair bombs exploded near the finish line. 

Photos: Timothy A. Clary/AFP/Getty Images, EPA/C.J. Gunther

Brie Fainblit is an L.A. County high school senior who set out to make her own prom dress from scratch because her family couldn’t afford to buy one. Her material of choice is soda-can tabs, which she crocheted into a one-of-a-kind dress, along with a matching clutch and choker for herself and a vest and belt for her boyfriend James. Here they are on their way to the dance:

Brie’s project was the subject of an installment in Times reporter Nita Lelyveld’s wonderful City Beat series. Readers of the story generously donated prom shoes, jewelry, cufflinks for James, limo service for the couple and more. The day after the prom, James asked Lelyveld to pass a message along to readers who had offered help: “Please let them know how incredibly grateful we are. We are not prideful people, but they have made us feel so good.”

Photos: Katie Falkenberg / Los Angeles Times

This is Zazzz, thought to be the country’s first identity-verifying marijuana vending machine. It was unveiled this month in Avon, Colorado, and it can check a purchaser’s identity before dispensing a product from an array of available items, including edibles and pre-rolled joints.
Photo: European Pressphoto Agency

This is Zazzz, thought to be the country’s first identity-verifying marijuana vending machine. It was unveiled this month in Avon, Colorado, and it can check a purchaser’s identity before dispensing a product from an array of available items, including edibles and pre-rolled joints.

Photo: European Pressphoto Agency

First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt in the pages of the L.A. Times shortly after her husband’s inauguration, courtesy of our history Tumblr.
latimespast:

Eleanor Roosevelt, then the brand-new first lady, walked to church by herself, “shattering another precedent,” on March 12, 1933. This item was published in the L.A. Times the following day. (Her husband had just been sworn in earlier that month, on March 4.)

More from our archives: Here’s Mrs. Roosevelt five years later, during a tour of government relief activities in L.A., and back in L.A. for the 1960 Democratic National Convention in 1960.

First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt in the pages of the L.A. Times shortly after her husband’s inauguration, courtesy of our history Tumblr.

latimespast:

Eleanor Roosevelt, then the brand-new first lady, walked to church by herself, “shattering another precedent,” on March 12, 1933. This item was published in the L.A. Times the following day. (Her husband had just been sworn in earlier that month, on March 4.)

More from our archives: Here’s Mrs. Roosevelt five years later, during a tour of government relief activities in L.A., and back in L.A. for the 1960 Democratic National Convention in 1960.

test reblogged from latimespast

Mom, this might be my last chance to tell you I love you.
stevebev:

The clouds over Los Angeles cleared up just enough to snap a picture of the Blood Moon.

Nice shot, Steven. This photo was our pick today for our Southern California Moments project. 

stevebev:

The clouds over Los Angeles cleared up just enough to snap a picture of the Blood Moon.

Nice shot, Steven. This photo was our pick today for our Southern California Moments project. 

test reblogged from stevebev

If you’re inside on Tumblr instead of outside watching the lunar eclipse, we feel obliged to notify you that, thanks to NASA and the Internet, you can see the view from the Marshall Space Flight Center in Alabama without leaving your computer.
Here, science reporter Deborah Netburn explains just what a “blood moon” is, exactly. We’ll be filling up this photo gallery as the night goes on. And if you’d like to see a bigger version of the infographic up top, you’ll find it on our science blog.

If you’re inside on Tumblr instead of outside watching the lunar eclipse, we feel obliged to notify you that, thanks to NASA and the Internet, you can see the view from the Marshall Space Flight Center in Alabama without leaving your computer.

Here, science reporter Deborah Netburn explains just what a “blood moon” is, exactly. We’ll be filling up this photo gallery as the night goes on. And if you’d like to see a bigger version of the infographic up top, you’ll find it on our science blog.

About 40% of L.A. County food trucks and carts haven’t been inspected in the field by health officials since letter grades were introduced three years ago. And most of the remaining 60% have only been inspected half as often as official guidelines specify. 
"How do I know that? Because Angelo Bellomo, director of environmental health for the county Department of Public Health, told me so. He oversees inspections of all eateries, including mobile ones," consumer columnist David Lazarus writes.
Nearly all area food trucks do get a separate annual certification inspection, but it happens at the truck’s storage site, not while it’s out serving food. The toughest part of inspecting in the field, Bellomo told Lazarus, is actually finding the trucks.
Photo: Lawrence K. Ho / Los Angeles Times

About 40% of L.A. County food trucks and carts haven’t been inspected in the field by health officials since letter grades were introduced three years ago. And most of the remaining 60% have only been inspected half as often as official guidelines specify. 

"How do I know that? Because Angelo Bellomo, director of environmental health for the county Department of Public Health, told me so. He oversees inspections of all eateries, including mobile ones," consumer columnist David Lazarus writes.

Nearly all area food trucks do get a separate annual certification inspection, but it happens at the truck’s storage site, not while it’s out serving food. The toughest part of inspecting in the field, Bellomo told Lazarus, is actually finding the trucks.

Photo: Lawrence K. Ho / Los Angeles Times